Hand Missal discussion and suggestions

In another entry about timing of an audience given by His Holiness to two cardinals in light of the forthcoming Motu Proprio, people in their understandable enthusaism started posting comments and recommendations about hand missals for use at the older, "Tridentine" form of Mass. 

Since this is a good topic in itself, it needs a separate entry.  Post them here.

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37 Responses to Hand Missal discussion and suggestions

  1. Craigmaddie says:

    I find the Baronius Press edition to be very good – it’s very beautiful to look at. And since I live in Scotland the Baronius Press edition is good for me as it has the Scottish feasts listed (as well as the English and Welsh).

    If you live in the UK Southwell Books are a good resource for all that is traditional and Catholic.

  2. slewi says:

    What I said in an earlier post is to go here to see the Baronius Press 1962 Missal. A very comprehensive and true version.

    Also I mentioned that I was able to come across a beautiful old 1962 missal at a church flea market, along with some other old catholic prayer books such as “Blessed Be God” which is quite a formidable prayer book. You can’t find much more “Catholicity” than that!

    Also, much pleasure is had from the old, beautiful prayer cards that the previous owner had lovingly tucked inside both the missal and prayer book. Real treasures!

    Enjoy your first Old Mass, Janet. There’s nothing like it!

    Stephen

  3. Stephen M. Collins says:

    Many people attending our TLM use the “St. Andrew Daily Missal” (circa 1945, reprinted in 2003 by St. Bonaventure Publications), and we have some extra copies availabe at the entrance. It’s a nice edition, but has some problems with the slightly adjusted rubrics of the Indult approved 1962 Missa1.

    1) It does not reflect the changes Pope Pius XII made in Holy Week.

    2) The guidlines and references to multiple Collects is much more extensive, not reflecting the simplifications made in the 1962 Missal.

    Some others use the “Roman Catholic Daily Missal” which IS from 1962, and has been reprinted in 2004 by Angelus Press..

    But if significant changes are made in the rubrics, added Prefaces and Collects, and Kalendar adjustment, neither will be sufficient in the long run. My hope is that the newly modified Missale Romanum will be made available by Rome to ALL via the internet. A simple TXT document would suffice for cutting and pasting into our worship aids.

    Fr. Z., is that something Ecclesia Dei can focus on?

  4. Brian Day says:

    Sorry to go off-topic so early in the discussion, but are there any missals for the Classic Roman Riteâ„¢ that uses scripture readings from other than the Douay-Rheims Bible?
    I wouldn’t want a version that uses the NAB (shudder), but the RSV-CE would be nice.
    Anything like that available?

    P.S. – I have two missals at home. I’ll post about them later in the day.

  5. Geoffrey says:

    I too use the Missal by Baronius Press when I attend the “old” Mass, and the “Daily Roman Missal” by Fr. Socias when I attend the “new” Mass.

    Here’s a fun question: If you could create your own hand missal, what features would you put in it? :-)

  6. slewi says:

    My link above did not work….Go here for the missal.

    Stephen Collins – I have read elsewhere, and agree with the statement that Catholics should not support Angelus Press because it is the publishing arm of the SSPX. And supporting Angelus indirectly supports the SSPX. I am curious to see what others who intend an indult think…

    Stephen

  7. Henry Edwards says:

    Janet: There’s a comparison of some currently available missals at

    http://www.knoxlatinmass.net/missals.htm.

    Also, a comparison of old and new at

    http://www.knoxlatinmass.net/OldNewMass.pdf

    that some “newcomers” to our local indult Mass have used to get oriented (pun intended, of course). You can write to me off-line with particular questions.

  8. Stephen M. Collins says:

    I’m afraid that I’m quite a bit more “liberal” than that! I also have possession of two of my Mother’s old Missals, but I would not hazard taking them to church with me regularly. Finding Missals in good enough condition in used book stores is not very practical. And those, in limited quantity, at such as Loome Theological Book Center, can be somewhat costly.

    “Supporting” something has many levels of involvement. I am a change ringer, and ring in a number of Episcoplaian churches. Some of them are conservative enough to be threatening to leave TEH, others are firm behind the Presiding Bishop in her oposition to the Anglican Communion’s demands. AND I keep a copy of “The Hymnal 1940″ right beside me at the organ console.

    Remember that “picking nits” usually requires a magnifiying glass!

    Sorry for this being off-topic. But a worship aid is a worship aid. That’s its job, no matter who makes it available.

  9. Henry Edwards says:

    I have read elsewhere, and agree with the statement that Catholics should not support Angelus Press because it is the publishing arm of the SSPX. And supporting Angelus indirectly supports the SSPX. I am curious to see what others who intend an indult think…

    My answer would be my personal practice. Our indult Mass meets only biweekly. So I attend the Novus Ordo Mass daily (and alternate Sundays) and carry my Magnificat as a missalette. I privately follow the TLM daily and use the Angelus Press missal for my personal readings. However, I use my Baronius Press missal exclusively when actually assisting at TLM. The explanation for this curious practice is that I prefer the Latin typography in the Angelus, but the English typography and translation in the Baronius. I’m something of a missal freak, and also occasionally use older missals like the 1952 Saint Andrew Daily Missal for various purposes.

  10. Stephen M. Collins says:

    What I would include in a hand Missal:

    1) All the possible Prefaces and Collects, some not actually in Missale Romanum 1962.

    2) At the end of each and every Collect the WHOLE translation, no matter which of the five forms is used for that Collect. They are all very beautiful, and go hand-in-glove with the text of the Prayer.

    3) Either marginal notes or red-print notes about what the Priest is doing, especially during the Consecration.

    4) The Kyriale in modern notation as one of the supplements. (Some will prefer the square chant notation, but I’m thinking but I’m thinking about John Q. Public here.)

  11. One of my complaints about the “Saint Andrew Daily Missal” from Saint Bonaventure Publications is that it doesn’t have any of the prefaces, unless I got a defective copy. It just skips those pages.
    I wouldn’t worry about having to find old hand missals in used book stores. If an indult comes out “New” missals will become available. Whether it is from those who want to republish missals out of respect for the old rite or whether publishers see this as a way to make money, they’ll be available.

  12. AlexB says:

    Here is a comparison of missals I wrote for our indult community:

    http://www.detroitlatinmass.org/jospht/32606.pdf

    The main point to observe is that no hand missal is really accurate. The Lasance and St. Andrew are the worst in terms of accuracy, despite their beauty and completeness in other ways.

    My vote goes to the Marian or Baronius.

  13. slewi says:

    Stephen Collins:

    The missal I was referring to was in great condition, and $1.00. Not too impractical methinks.

    And picking nits does not require anything other than the Church telling us we should not support the SSPX. I am happy to continue this elsewhere, but this is not the topic at hand.

    Stephen

  14. Joshua says:

    The Baronius is very good, but a bit bulky. While it has the feasts for the US (was well as England, Wales, Scotland and I think Ireland) it’s marriage ceremony is the British one. While the particular American ceremony for marriage in the American ritual at that time was sappy and a sign of things to come, I don’t think (correct me if I am wrong) one could opt for the British or Irish versions (the Irish differs merely by cutting “With my body I thee worship” from the vows). It might have been better had they just followed the Roman Ritual, which can be used in either place.

    The one from Angelus press I think is the best one for comprehensiveness. It has all the sacraments. It also, suprise suprise, has just the 1962 rubrics (no 2nd confiteor for instance). Its real drawback is the publisher.

    For a handier Missal I like Fr. Stedman’s Sunday Missal. Nice and compact, with Latin-English for the ordinary

  15. Henry Edwards says:

    One of my complaints about the “Saint Andrew Daily Missal” from Saint Bonaventure Publications is that it doesn’t have any of the prefaces, unless I got a defective copy. It just skips those pages.

    My copy of the Saint Andrew Daily Missal (which predates the St. Bonaventure Pub. reprinting) includes the 15 standard pre-1962 prefaces, as does (I believe) every traditional missal I’ve seen (of those published after Christ the King was added circa 1925). I’ve heard somewhere of a recent reprint that invertently omitted a block of pages, and of an insert being sent out.

    The 1962 promulgation included 5 additional “Gallican” prefaces — St. John the Baptist, Most Blessed Sacrament, All Saints, Advent, and Dedication of a Church. The Baronius includes all 5 of these especially beautiful new (actually, very old prefaces, 8th century?), but the Angelus omits the first of these.

  16. gravitas says:

    Most everyone at our Mass uses the 1945 Missal — either the St. Andrew or the Fr. Lasance. While my wife uses the Fr. Lasance, I prefer the St. Andrew. Not to dumb it down, but the St. Andrew is like the New York Times of missals — you really have to know your stuff and be able to follow the Mass almost without a missal. The Fr. Lasance is more for beginners with pictures and explanations. Still a great missal but leaves much to be desired for some. I don’t know of almost anyone at our church who uses the 1962 version.

  17. techno_aesthete says:

    One of my complaints about the “Saint Andrew Daily Missal” from Saint Bonaventure Publications is that it doesn’t have any of the prefaces, unless I got a defective copy. It just skips those pages.

    I have had my copy of the St. Andrew Daily Missal from St. Bonaventure Pubs. for five or six years. In the section of the ordinary of the Mass, there is one of the prefaces (I don’t have it in front of me and don’t recall the details) and a small note giving the page number (990?) where the rest of the prefaces can be found. My copy does have those prefaces on the pages indicated. Your mileage may vary.

  18. danphunter1 says:

    The Angelus Press Missal of 1962 has great commentary next to the mass in the side columns.
    It is great commentary on what is occuring,step by step during sacred Mass,and explanations of the rubrics ie:At the words of consecration the side liner notes relate to us:”These sins of the cross call down the blessing of God,that the bread may be changed into the same sacrificial Body that hung on the Cross,and the wine into the same sacrificial Blood which was shed on the cross.The first three signs of the cross at benedictam,adscriptam,ratam,signify the selling of Christ to the Priests,to the scribes,and to the Pharisees,or signify the thirty pieces for which He was sold.The following two signs of the cross signify the person of Judas the seller,and Christ Who was sold.”
    This is just a sample of the awesome commentary in the,Roman Catholic Daily Missal 1962.
    It is so informative and edifying.
    God bless you.

  19. Demerzel says:

    Hmm… wouldn’t it be pertinent to take a look at old Missals that haven’t been reprinted? Like the 1961 St Andrew’s Daily Missal, the 1962 Fr Stedman’s Sunday Missal, 1961 St Pius X Daily Missal, Fulton Sheen Sunday Missal, etc

    Personally I are think the 1961 St Andrew’s Daily Missal and Fulton Sheen Sunday Missal are worth reprinting.

  20. maynardus says:

    At our indult Mass the SSPX Missal outnumbers the Baronius by about three-to-one. After having the chance to examine both I bought one myself as my 1953 “St. Mary Daily Missal and Heritage” was getting a little loose and my 1962 “Fulton Sheen Sunday Missal” lacked weekdays. I’ve had it about a year and am very pleased. Whatever one thinks of the SSPX it is incontestable that they have given a wonderful gift to Holy Mother Church.

  21. thetimman says:

    I attend an Institute of Christ the King Oratory, and have never set foot in an SSPX chapel.

    That being said, the Angelus Press Missal cannot be beaten. It is new, it is now available in Leather, too, after years of that other yet-to-be-identified substance. It is readable, not bulky, beautiful, and contains many prayer and sacramental aids apart from the Mass itself.

    The only drawback is that it has the “restored” Holy Week liturgies instead of the pre-1955. If you are lucky enough to attend the pre-1955 Holy Week, as we are here, you have to supplement with an older Missal.

    My spiritual director (ICRSP) said it was fine to buy this Missal. By all means, check with your own, but I don’t think it approaches sinfulness. I wouldn’t consider it a donation, it is a fee for a product. If you buy Levi’s jeans, for instance, you pay for the product, not for the despicable organizations to which they give money.

  22. thetimman says:

    p.s. I was in no way labelling the SSPX as despicable, above. Though I don’t agree with the consecrations of 1988, I respect their members and pray for a just resolution for all.

  23. Henry Edwards says:

    In my posted review, I obviously found it impossible to choose objectively between the relative merits of the Angelus and Baronius missals, simply the two finest Latin-English missals in the long history of the genre.

    But it’s interesting to look at the web site http://www.cantius.org/ of St. John Cantius Church in Chicago, along with Father Z’s own St. Agnes in St. Paul surely one of the finest Catholic parishes in the entire world. But if you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you’ll see that the only traditional missal their web store sells (for their indult Mass) is the Angelus.

  24. Sean says:

    I use The Roman Missal (1962) (Baronius Press, 2004) which as a full Latin-English weekday missal is slightly bulky, together with two small sunday missals circa late 1930s in English with Latin-English ordinary that fit the palm of the hand and once belonged to my parents. After an initial 3 months of following the mass real-time in the weekday missal I have since either read the proper the night before and left the weekday missal at home or occasionally taken one of the sunday missals with me for the continuity it represents. In using a missal I have not tried to learn the responses/major prayers by rote but have left them to form into blocks from repeated hearing that I can at some point marshal together and polish using the missal. After nearly a year everything except the credo (almost) and prayers at the foot of the altar are in, even the suscipiat!

  25. Philip James says:

    The Baronius Missal text is an updating of the old British “Laverty and Co” Daily Missal, and in my old Laverty missal at the moment of the Elevation of the Host the descriptive text includes the following which has been dropped from the Baronius edition “Look up at the Sacred Host, with faith, piety, and love, saying: “My Lord and my God!” (indulgence of 7 years)”. I’ve noticed that many Catholics today, particularly younger Catholics, keep their heads bowed at the moment of Consecration. As as child (now 50) I learnt that one should look up at the host, stike one’s breast and say (internally) the words of St Thomas “My Lord and My God”. Indeed, at my local UK parish, the practice of saying out loud “My Lord and My God” at the Elevation has weathered all of the liturgical reforms and has persisted to the present day, followed soon after of course with the Memorial Acclamation. Presumably Baronius dropped this exhortation due to the revisions in Indulgences, but this defeats the original intention: Rev J B O’Connell pointed out in his rubrical book “The Celebration of Mass”, “The Church desires the faithful to look at the Sacred Host at the moment of the Elevation. To encourage this practice, there is an indulgence of seven years each time, for looking on the Host, with faith, piety, and love, while saying the words “My Lord and my God”; and a plenary indulgence once a week to those who do this daily for a week provided they go to confession, receive Holy Communion (once), and pray for the intentions of the Holy Father (Pius X, 1907; S. Paen. Ap., June 21 1927; Jan 26, 1937).

    As the Angelus Press 1962 Missal was released before the Baronius Missal I bought that first, and I must say that from a practical point of view I find the Angelus Press verion superior (although it does not have the supplement for England,Wales or Scotland) – the paper is thinner (and therefore the Missal is less bulky), it has rounded corners, larger text which is therefore easier on the eye and being thinner sits better in the hand.

  26. Henry Edwards says:

    The Church desires the faithful to look at the Sacred Host at the moment of the Elevation.

    One might wonder whether elevation of the Host could have any purpose other than adoration of it, and whether a person might adore it consciously at that precise moment without looking at it.

    Of course, some celebrants nowadays don’t get the Host high enough to really warrant the term “elevation”. But from several decades of observation I’ve inferred the working principle that the height of a priest’s elevation is proportional to the depth of his faith. Perhaps enough exceptions to prove the rule, but ordinarily pretty reliable, it seems to me.

  27. aeneas says:

    Stephen,
    Please don’t be unwilling to support the Angelus Press and thereby the SSPX. Without the SSPX I doubt very much that we would be so close to a Motu Proprio on the Traditional Mass as we are now. Someone had to take a stand during the dark days of the 1970′s and 1980′s. THEY DID! Also, for a person interested in the Latin text of the propers of the Mass, the Angelus Press edition has a slightly larger and definitely more readable version, thought not as good as the 1956 St. Andrew missal.

  28. Henry Edwards says:

    This is just a sample of the awesome commentary in the [Angelus] Roman Catholic Daily Missal 1962.

    In the margin at the beginning of the Roman Canon, we read:

    “From all time, the Canon has been recited silently. The congregation present can contribute nothing to the sacrificial act itself; the people are present before a mystery which it is for the consecrated priest alone to accomplish. The Priest has entered alone into the Holy of Holies to pray and offer sacrifice for the whole Church.”

    Not quite your average liturgist’s cup of tea.

  29. Janet says:

    I decided to buy the Angelus Press daily missal, and have ordered it just a few minutes ago. I think of this purchase as an act of faith that the latin mass (which I’ve never seen) will be liberated imminently.

    As to the concerns about Angelus Press and their SSPX ties: how many of you buy Girl Scout cookies each year? And did you know that Girl Scouts of America contributes to Planned Parenthood? Same difference, I think. Enjoy your oookies and I’ll enjoy my new missal when it arrives. (grins)

  30. SaintBede says:

    I have prepared my own Ordo Missae for the 1962 Missal, which will be published under Imprimatur in Australia in the next couple of months. A Sunday Missal is also under consideration. For those who are interested in new translations which are of sacral character, but without “thee” “thou” and other archaisms, this may be for you. I hope I can persuade Fr. Z to allow me a little space to write about it.
    Michael.

  31. Sean says:

    SaintBede: I have prepared my own Ordo Missae for the 1962 Missal… For those who are interested in new translations which are of sacral character, but without “thee” “thou” and other archaisms, this may be for you.

    What freedom the disconnect of vernacular from liturgical language gives us. Our preferred choice of archaic, modern, inclusive, etc liturgy without forcing it upon anyone else. I’ll have the modern, non-inclusive plugin please.

  32. Sean says:

    (corrected formatting)

    SaintBede:I have prepared my own Ordo Missae for the 1962 Missal… For those who are interested in new translations which are of sacral character, but without “thee” “thou” and other archaisms, this may be for you.

    What freedom the disconnect of vernacular from liturgical language gives us. Our preferred choice of archaic, modern, inclusive, etc liturgy without forcing it upon anyone else. I’ll have the modern, non-inclusive plugin please.

  33. SaintBede says:

    Yes indeed Sean; thank you. Fear not, there is no “male-excluding” language in this Mass-book. Happily I have the freedom to be “incorrect” politically in that sphere.

  34. slewi says:

    Aeneas – Actually, I believe that myself and all those with a love for the Old Mass owe quite a bit to the SSPX. Without them, there would have been no FSSP, and as you stated, no Motu Proprio hopefully on the way. I think they have done more for tradition than the FSSP, actually. I just pray they can be reconcilled with Mother Church.

    However, I am somewhat surprised by Cardinal Hoyos declaring that the SSPX was not in schism, when Pope JPII clearly said that they were. It sometimes seems the more they clarify, they more they confuse.

    Anyways,
    God Bless!
    Stephen

  35. Jeff says:

    Hand missals are an invention of the devil. They are not traditional at all. We should express our devotion during Mass by praying the rosary. What the priest does at the altar is none of our business!

    Come back rood screens; why did you leave us?

  36. Josh says:

    Decisions, decisions…

    When I’m singing with the choir at Mass, I very often just use my Liber Usualis, since I have sufficient Latin to follow along alright. Who, having been to Mass for a while, having used a parallel English/Latin missal, can’t follow the ordinary of the Mass in the Latin?

    However, for Low Mass (and for High Mass sometimes) I use my 1954 St Andrew Daily Missal with Vespers for Sundays and Feasts. It’s very dear to me, as it belonged to the mother of an old friend, a stalwart of the Latin Mass Society of England and Wales: of your charity, please pray for the repose of the soul of Kathleen Margaret Rose Gard, ob. 14 Aug. 1994, aged 93.

    One question – sometimes I find hand missal translations of the orations, especially the secrets and postcommunions, rather too free. Fr Z, when will you do a wdtprs on the TLM?!

    Example: Postcommunion of Laetare Sunday, “Da nobis qms misericors Deus: ut sancta tua, quibus incessanter explemur, sinceris tractemus obsequiis, et fideli semper mente sumamus. Per.” This was paraphrased in old sorts of odd ways in various hand missals, whereas none gave the sort of painfully (in the good sense) literal rendering that Fr Z provides us.

    As for those who condemn missals containing vernacular translations, the condemnation thereof by Pope Alexander VII in 1661 (brief “Ad aures nostras”: “We abhor and detest this novelty which deforms the perpetual beauty of the Church and which easily engenders disobedience, temerity, audacity, sedition, schism, and many other evils”) was obtained by underhanded means for the political ends of Cardinal Mazarin, hence under canon law was not binding; strictly it applied only to French translations; and in any case vernacular translations of the missal were removed from the Index in the late 19th C.

    If I wished, I could take to Mass my 1796 “A Companion to the Altar, or Compact Pocket Miffal”, which I got very cheaply at a secondhand bookshop, once again proving that he who seeks, finds. Apart from not containing any feasts introduced in the last 211 years (!) it’s perfectly serviceable, and, best of all, SMALL, actually pocket-sized, unlike those “hand missals” that are larger and more complicated than one-volume hardback editions of The Lord of the Rings. I mean, why not go all the way and bring your own altar missal! (Belloc did.)

    That said, I very often close my missal at the Canon, and just try and pray. Lyndwood, the great medieval English canonist, answered very truly the question why the Canon is silent, by writing “Ne impediatur populus orare” – that the people be not hindered from praying. Just as in the Novus Ordo anyone who pays attention knows the Eucharistic Prayers &c. word-for-word (and instantly grimaces when some silly priest changes the words about), so in the TLM those who attend come to know the ordinary, and after a while can leave aside their missals and just try to pray. This is true participatio actuosa – would that we put into practice this grace.

    Sufficit.

  37. boeciana says:

    the following which has been dropped from the Baronius edition “Look up at the Sacred Host, with faith, piety, and love, saying: “My Lord and my God!” (indulgence of 7 years)”

    I would imagine it’s been dropped because the Baronius edition has all the indulgences updated to reflect current practice – ‘partial’ rather than ’40 days’ and all that.

    It might be nice if the Latin were in slightly bigger type, but I say that ‘cos I’m a medievalist Latin geek. Otherwise I love the Baronius missal.