Card. Zen in N. Italy at the Pope’s Angelus

WDTPRS’s favorite active Cardinal, His Eminence Joseph Zen was in attendance at today’s Angelus, way up north in Lorenzago di Cadore where the Pope is having an alpine vacation.  With Cardinal Zen came large group of Chinese pilgrims. 

Fr. Lombardi, the papal spokesman, said that His Eminence and the Pope spoke about issues relating to the Letter to Chinese Catholics.  This is especially important in light of the intention of the Patriotic Association’s move to replace the Archbishop of Beijing.  In sense, this is test of that Letter’s metal.

Present also was the elderly brother of the late Pope John Paul I.

The bishop of Belluno gave a beautiful speech to the Pope before the Angleus.  Here it is in Italian.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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3 Responses to Card. Zen in N. Italy at the Pope’s Angelus

  1. Syriacus says:

    “The bishop of Belluno gave a beautiful speech to the Pope before the Angleus.”

    Beautiful indeed… Grazie, Padre Zeta!

  2. Daniel Anselmo says:

    I didn’t know that the excellent pope JPI had a brother… Interesting.

  3. Shoshiru Honda says:

    I did figuring. Pope John Paul I was elected near 30 years ago at 65. Had He survived as Pope, of course it’s doubtful Hed’ still be here at 95, but His brother must be 95 or even amybe older when He met Pope benedict XVI yesterday!

    I read onetime where Pope John Paul I was very well disposed to the Tridentine Latin Mass and tradition of Catholicism.
    I also read He was very displeased with liberal priests, Jesuits etc. and perhaps even was going supress the Jesuits (back in 1978 they had radical liberal Pedro Arrupe as leader, and were worse then than now…although they have improved not at all in 30 years).

    I wonder if Pope John Paul I would have brought the Tridentine Latin Mass back faster, or ended the Jesuits. Both would have been good moves.

    But now we have the Tridentine Latin Mass, which we all hope flourishes and grows rapidely in the Church. As for the Jesuits, they are so old in most places, with no vocations that is no necessary thinking about supressing them. Like many other Orders of priests, brothers and sisters, they will die out shortly on their own.