Books from Baronius Press

I received today some books from Baronius Press.

The titles were from different sections, and included titles like

The Dolorous Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ

The Way of Perfection

There was also some fiction, Lord of the World, by Robert Hugh Benson, which everyone should read.

They sent Newman’s The Idea of a University.

Etc.

Unfortunately there were no liturgical titles in the shipment.

The hardcovers have a very nice, large type face, which would make them easy to read even when the light wasn’t strong. They have a ribbon. The softcovers are like a trade-paperback size (that is, a little larger, and open easily. They have the same good typeface, making them easy to read.

I am very pleased to have received these books.

I applaud the publishers who provide not only classics of Christian literature, but also the liturgical tools clergy and lay people will be needing as the Holy Father’s Summorum Pontificum is lived more and more.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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18 Responses to Books from Baronius Press

  1. Rouxfus says:

    I’ve been pleased with the quality Baronius editions of several books. Their hardback volume of The Imitation of Christ is excellent, and so is their paper-bound edition of St. Francis de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life. I also have two of their Douay-Rheims Holy Bibles – the ‘pocket’ edition will fit in a pocket but it is pretty big. It’s perfect for a briefcase. The Roman Missal (1962) is well done.

  2. Ian says:

    I think all of their liturgical stuff is in reprint.

  3. mike says:

    I have the Fabian (good Polish name) missal and the pocket bible. My 11 yr old son recently used the bible for a school religion project and didn’t seem to be put off by Ye Olde English. Nice books.

    m

  4. Henry Edwards says:

    Father Z: Unfortunately there were no liturgical titles in the shipment.

    Why don’t you ask them to send you a copy of their Roman Missal 1962 (“Daily Missal 1962”) when the reprint is available. Their blurb says they are taking pre-orders for October delivery. Specify, of course, your choice of black, white, or burgundy leather cover.

    Your detailed review of this 2224-page missal—“At last! The Roman Missal according to the typical edition of 1962.”—would surely be both edifying and informative.

  5. Thomas Burk says:

    2 years ago I bought their 1962 Missal (since I had only older editions from used book stores). It’s a treasure! So is their Bible.

  6. Aelric says:

    Ditto the recommendation of Msgr. Benson’s apocalypse (though I have only the trade paperback version). Compare & contrast with ‘Father Elijah’ by Michael O’Brien (though the latter does not quite have the extraordinary prognostication value as Benson’s classic).

  7. Le Renard says:

    What happened to Abandonment to Divine Providence?

    That’s a great book!

  8. I have read The way of Perfection, The Dolorous Passion and started Lord of the World but never finished it. They are all excellent.

  9. Timothy James says:

    Maybe Im old-fashioned but I can’t understand why all books don’t have ribbons! It just makes sense to me. It looks nice and it saves the trouble of finding some random piece of paper to use as a bookmark when I need one, since I can never seem to find a real one when I need it.

  10. Matt says:

    Baronius is fantastic. I am currently awaiting my pre-order of the Little Office. I also wish they would reprint a soft-leather cover 1962 version of the Liber Usualis. Big project I know…but we can always dream. :-)

  11. Pilgrim says:

    I love Fr. Benson’s writings. I have read many of them, including “Lord of the World.” In fact, I just started “Dawn of All” TODAY. I think every Catholic should read “Lord of the World.”

  12. RichR says:

    I, too, am awaiting the release of my pre-ordered Little Office of the BVM. If I was smart, I would have bought stock in this company. Their products are very durable, high quailty books.

    Here’s my only concern: with the call to update the calendar of the 1962 missal to include recently-canonized saints, will the wise man wait until the update to buy a hand missal with the new feasts?

  13. Henry Edwards says:

    Rich: Here’s my only concern: with the call to update the calendar of the 1962 missal to include recently-canonized saints, will the wise man wait until the update to buy a hand missal with the new feasts?

    My answer would be No. I claim absolutely no inside information, but I certainly won\’t be holding my breath for this during the intervening years before any such revision and the subsequent publication of updated missals.

    The really big mistake would be to buy a new ordinary form missal right now.

  14. “Lord of the World” was a great book. Riveting too. I think I read the whole thing in just a few days. Given that the book takes place in basically today’s time period, it is interesting to see how different technology is compared to what Robert Hugh Benson thought it would be back in the 1900’s. However, it is a bit scary to see some of the similarities in the world’s morals.
    I think the thing that disturbed me the most was how vastly different his extrapolation of what the Chruch would be like is in his book compared to what the Church is really like now (like how the pope had re-instituted the death penalty in the Papal Estates). (The reinstatement of the death penalty didn’t disturb me, just the difference in the what the Church seemed like in the book compared to what it actually is now.)
    I noticed the same thing about what the Church would be like in “A Canticle for Liebowitz.” The implementation of Vatican II certainly changed the Church. (For better or for worse is for another topic.)

  15. Brian Crane says:

    I have heard that some of the Baronius titles have problems with typos. Can anyone confirm whether this is true?

  16. Legisperitus says:

    There is one major typo that has appeared in every reprint of “Lord of the World” (in America, anyway) since at least the 1950’s. It appears in Book III, Chapter V, Section III, and goes like this:

    And, again, although he was well aware of the eight-day law in the matter, even if she had determined on such a step there was nothing to show that she was still in Eng-
    land, and, in fact, it was more than likely that if she were
    bent on such an act she would go abroad for it, where laxer conditions prevailed. In short, it seemed that he could do no good by remaining in England, and the temptation to be present at the final act of justice in the East by which
    land, and, in fact, it was more than likely that if she were
    to be wiped out, and Franklin, too, among them– Franklin, that parody of the Lord of the World– this, added to the opinion of his colleagues in the Government, …

    (The man could write some long sentences.) Anyway, you can see what happened: a whole line of text was repeated where it didn’t belong, and another whole line was correspondingly deleted. The correct text goes like this:

    And, again, although he was well aware of the eight-day law in the matter, even if she had determined on such a step there was nothing to show that she was still in Eng-
    land, and, in fact, it was more than likely that if she were
    bent on such an act she would go abroad for it, where laxer conditions prevailed. In short, it seemed that he could do no good by remaining in England, and the temptation to be present at the final act of justice in the East by which
    those who had indirectly been the cause of his tragedy were
    to be wiped out, and Franklin, too, among them– Franklin, that parody of the Lord of the World– this, added to the opinion of his colleagues in the Government, …

    Can anyone inform us whether the Baronius edition suffers from this defect? (Since it is a British edition, I hold out a small amount of hope for it.) Thanks.

  17. Kim says:

    I am eagerly looking forward to Baronius’ publication of the English-Latin Breviary, and I mentioned it today to a a seminarian friend of mine. He wants to start immediately praying the Office according to the 1962 Breviary, but I will have to improve my Latin considerably before I can even consider that – hence my eagerness for the Baronius Breviary.

    An important question came up in our discussion of the differences between the two forms: Are secular priests obliged to pray Terce, None and Sext, or may they – as with the newer form – pick one of the three? Would this fall under the code of canon law or of liturgical rubrics? If anyone could provide an answer, with or without a citation to an official text, that would be most appreciated!

  18. Kim says:

    Another question: I know Baronius is republishing the Catena Aurea, so I\’m wondering if anyone knows if Baronius or any other publisher will be reprinting St Thomas\’ Summa Theologiae. I have been looking for used copies, and the ones I find are in rather mediocre condition and very expensive. Any idea where I can find the Summa in Latin? I usually use an electronic version for reference, but I would like to acquire a print copy.

    I understand the Marietti text is the best one to get, but any comments on different editions would be helpful as well.