Cardinals Elect: Galveston-Houston!

I was surprised on the selection

First, His Excellency Daniel DiNardo did a License at the Augustinianum!

He had a good statement on the Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum.

What is going on?

Both men, Archbp. Foley, and Archbp. DiNardo are from Pennsylvania.

Archbp. Wuerl?

He’s from Pennsylvania too.

Not on the list?

Archbp. Piero Marini isn’t on it either! (He’s not from Pennsylvania.)

What is going on?

It strikes me that Pope Benedict is doing something for the USA based on his experience of Germany.

In Germany there are some sees which are virtually a lock on a red hat.  Go there, you’ll be named cardinal.  However, it happens that the cardinalate is bestowed here and there on bishops who aren’t in those traditionally cardinal sees.

It might be that this is what is going on in the selection of Cardinal DiNardo.  It maybe that Pope Benedict wanted this particular man, in this see at this time with no intention of establishing a tradition (which St. Louis lost).

A floating red hat in the USA would sure keep some men on their toe, wouldn’t it?

Congratulations to the new Cardinals Elect!

Ad multos annos!

Cardinals Elect: Galveston-Houston!
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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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43 Responses to Cardinals Elect: Galveston-Houston!

  1. dcs says:

    Fr. Z.,

    It does not appear that Abp. Wuerl was given a red hat. Is that why you mentioned him in this post? Because you were surprised that he was not made a Cardinal (being the Archbishop of Washington, D.C., which has been a “Cardinatial” See since 1967)?

  2. Mark says:

    It would make no sense for Wuerl to get a red hat. McCarrick is not yet 80, so that would be two Cardinal-Electors from the same see.

  3. Nick says:

    Good pick Your Holiness — May God grant them both peace, health and happiness for many happy years!

  4. Vincent Uher says:

    Archbishop DiNardo is one of the greatest minds in the Church. The Cardinal-designate is my Archbishop here in Galveston-Houston, and I believe his elevation is both because of his wisdom and because of his unrelenting commitment to fidelity to and communion with the Holy Father. Vocations fairly flower where he walks, and he is an amazing inspiration to the young, to converts as well as the battle-weary. Laus Deo!

  5. Rouxfus says:

    Here is the correct link to Archbishop’s communication on the S.P.:

    http://www.diogh.org/BishopPastorals/bishop3mess-070107.asp

    and here is a link to the WDTPRS favorable deconstruction of his message:

    http://wdtprs.com/blog/2007/07/archbp-of-galveston-houston-on-the-motu-proprio/

    the Fathers of the Church blog had nice words for the Cardinal-elect:

    http://www.fathersofthechurch.com/2007/10/17/cardinal-virtue/

  6. Tominellay says:

    Cardinal-designate Daniel DiNardo was at the NPM convention in Indianapolis this past summer. He led a discussion on translations of liturgical texts; it is clear that he favors strict or literal translations from Latin to English. He also favors sung liturgies…

  7. EJ says:

    Does anyone know the Cardinal-elect’s stance on pro-choice politicians being admitted to Holy Communion? We need a red hat to go to someone who sees eye to eye with Archbishop Burke, et al., on this important issue. Not one resident U.S. cardinal agrees with Burke on this issue, sadly not even Cardinal George or O’Malley. On a side note, as a Washingtonian, I am not sad at all that the red hat has passed over the head of our current archbishop, at least for now – frankly I see it as a good thing that more deserving men are elevated than just those prelates appointed to major sees who seem to be elevated by default.

  8. John Enright says:

    Father,

    It is not just a Pennsylvania connection. It is a Philadelphia – ahem – phenomena that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will essentially have three Cardinals.

    Archbishop John Foley, grand master of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulcher of Jerusalem, who entered into service in Philadelphia;

    Justin Cardinal Rigali, current Archbishop of Philadelphia; and

    Anthony Cardinal Bevilacqua, retired Archbishop of Philadelphia.

    Let’s not forget Cardinal O’Connor, a Philly born-and-bred titan.

  9. Steve says:

    Any thoughts on why Archbishop Burke did not get the nod?

  10. Animadversor says:

    Quite possibly, Archbishop DiNardo is to be created a Cardinal entirely on account of his personal qualities, but it is also possible that Galveston-Houston is now so large and important that it has become a “cardinaltial see.” Of course, neither possibility excludes the other.

    Now to the important stuff: In the photograph which Father Z has posted, is His Excellency wearing a surplice rather than a rochet? The sleeves seem awfully wide. Please be charitable in your comments.

  11. Animadversor says:

    Uh, sorry, cardinalatial, not cardinaltial.

  12. Andy K. says:

    Dear Fr. Zuhlsdorf,

    I do have one modest question:
    Is it possible that the Detroit see for the red hat could be moving to the South, where more Catholics, and therefore a greater influence, are?

    I am surprised on one level that it is G-H, because G-H was only made an archdiocese about 2 or 3 years ago.

  13. TNCath says:

    I am wondering if the Holy Father might not have other plans for Archbishop Burke, just as he did then-Archbishop Rigali before he was transferred to Philadelphia. Just think what a man like “Cardinal Burke” would be for New York!

  14. TNCath says:

    Oh, and by the way, it sure does look like Archbishop DiNardo is wearing a surplice. Needless to say, he’ll have a rochet for the consistory!

  15. RosieC says:

    Hmmm…did all of the named Holy men go to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary by any chance? After the recent lengthy discussion on formation, I wonder if that plays a role, either directly in that the Holy Father looked specifically at their education or indirectly, in that graduates of that school tend to demonstrate qualitites for which the Holy Father is looking.

  16. Different says:

    Unfortunately, it is unlikely that Archbishop Burke will get a red hat as long as he remains in St. Louis. St. Louis is very historical, but is also very small. The last cardinal in St. Louis was named in 1969. I do think Archbishop Burke will be a cardinal, but it will be in another archdiocese (Chicago or New York), after all he’s only 59.

  17. RBrown says:

    1. I don’t think Msgr Wuerl ever studied at Borromeo. I think he studied theology at CU and in Rome. When I met him in 1972, he was Cardinal Wright’s secretary.

    2. I think Msgr Foley was a philosophy prof at Borromeo.

    3. Cardinal Rigali is originally from California. A month ago he was named to the Cong of Bishops.

    4. Pennsylvania didn’t go crazy after VatII, largely because of the influence of Cardinal Kroll.

  18. Different says:

    Borromeo is a great place. I hear their seminarians actually wear cassocks to class, all of them.

  19. Tim H says:

    As for the holy Father’s plan for Burke. Just my suspicion, but Cardinal George is not well at all. Perhaps Burke will be sent to Chicago?

  20. John Enright says:

    RosieC:

    Don’t know about the others, but this is a short clip from the Wikipedia article on Archbishop Foley:

    Born in Darby, Pennsylvania, John Foley studied at Saint Joseph’s Preparatory School; Saint Joseph’s College, from where he obtained a bachelor’s degree in history; St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood, earning a doctorate in philosophy; and Columbia University’s School of Journalism, earning his master’s degree in journalism. He was ordained to the priesthood by John Cardinal Krol on May 19, 1962, for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and celebrated his first Mass the next day at Holy Spirit Church in Sharon Hill, PA. He then served as assistant editor and Rome correspondent for the archdiocesan newspaper, The Catholic Standard & Times. From 1970 to 1984 he was the newspaper’s editor, and in 1976 he became a Monsignor.

    There’s more located at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Patrick_Foley.

  21. Henry Edwards says:

    Borromeo is a great place. I hear their seminarians actually wear cassocks to class, all of them.

    I believe this year’s entering class at Borromeo is getting “cassocked” this coming weekend.

  22. John Enright says:

    RBrown:

    You’re absolutely right about Cardinal Kroll. He was GREAT as an archbishop. He confirmed me in second grade, when he was still an archbishop. For months, we were drilled by the IHM sisters on the answers to the questions expected to be asked by Archbishop Kroll. When the time came, he asked “Who knows the answers to the questions?” Everyone raised his or her hand. Then he asked, “Who knows the questions?” Everyone lowered their hands. He roared with laughter, and didn’t ask a single question. When he said to me “Receive the Holy Ghost,” I knew he was sincere.

    Philadelphia is a comparatively conservative jurisdiction, and for that I am very thankful. I became an Altar Boy during the transition from the TLM to the Norvus Ordo. That transformation, however, took a long time and we, in Philadelphia, used the unofficial Missal of 1965 until about 1974.

    I can still remember the TLM, and can still speak the servers’ responses, even though I’m only 50. (Can’t beleive I said that. Can’t believe I’m that old. )

  23. Alcuin of York says:

    The rumors I’ve heard suggest that Wuerl’s red hat is being delayed by McCarrick. Apparently retired cardinals have some say in this.

  24. Little Gal says:

    Just my suspicion, but Cardinal George is not well at all. Perhaps Burke will be sent to Chicago?

    Comment by Tim H — 17 October 2007 @ 5:13 pm

    The antispam caveat is appropriate considering the inaccuracy of this comment. The good Cardinal, like many people with cancer, was treated and assured that they ‘got everything.’ Also, I doubt that he would have submitted his name for consideration as head of the USCCB if he were in a bad way.

  25. Cody says:

    I used to live in the Houston area. The G-H Archdiocese is growing tremendously, largely due to immigration. When the diocese was elevated in status, I had a sense that the Archbishop would eventually be given the red hat.

  26. Nicholas Picini says:

    I don’t believe that Abp Wuerl didn’t receive a red hat because Washington would have 2 Cardinal-electors – Boston has 2: Cardinal O’Malley and Cardinal Law. Perhaps the Pope is using a different criteria than simply awarding a red hat to particular sees.

    I wish Abp Burke had received one.

  27. John Enright says:

    Nicholas Picini:

    I think I agree with you. As I note before, Philly now has three Cardinals. BTW, I’m not gloating, but merely reciting the facts.

  28. fr. houston says:

    FYI, cardinal dinardo went to the NAC. He also taught patristics while he was working at the congregation of bishops.

  29. Tito says:

    Archbishop DiNardo is highly personable and very orthodox. His style is more of the Pope John Paul II variety, he wins their hearts over rather than browbeating them over the head.

  30. Andy K. says:

    Dear Nicholas Pacini,

    I understand what you mean, RE: DC and two red hats. Do remember that H.E. André Vingt-Trois of Paris is named in this consistory, and not when H.E. Lustiger retired from serving that see.

  31. Matt says:

    I’m not so sure about Abp. DiNardo. He teaches well and truly orthodox,
    but what of the disobedience in his diocese? It’s pretty bad in some areas.

    His Catholic Charities has a pro-abortion politician on the board. He gives
    very little support to pro-life activities, as it would appear he is far more
    interested in illegal immigrants.

    Up until the motu proprio came out, the Abp. maintained the restrictive policies
    of his predecessor with regard to the Traditional Mass.

    He has spoken in favor of women feet washing on Holy Thursday, and is quite lax
    other liturgical matters.

    He allows paganism and modernism to be practiced publicly in the Dominican
    sister’s house across from the Chancery and in the Cenacle Retreat House.

    I pray for him to begin acting on these issues.

    God Bless,

    Matt

  32. Vincent Uher says:

    Matt,

    I think your assessment is too harsh. Archbishop DiNardo walked into a disaster zone in Galveston-Houston, and some of the first things he did as Coadjutor included praying with and saying masses for the various Pro-Life Apostolates in Houston. He has given support and encouragement to orthodox groups like “Fullness of Truth” and other efforts that did not have such support before.

    He also has given tremendous support to converts like me (an ex-Anglican priest) and to the Anglican Use parish of Our Lady of Walsingham.

    His hallmark is fidelity to the Holy Father. He does not engage in innovations of his own, and he has turned the ship of the Archdiocese back toward the safe harbour of Rome. There is still a lot of sailing ahead, but there couldn’t be a better captain for it. He isn’t throwing people overboard, and with those whose formation was so “American Catholic” he has made extraordinary efforts to keep them from jumping ship (or jumping the shark).

    Some of our bishops like Archbishop Burke reveal — like an ikon — the Divine Will. Archbishop DiNardo is rather more of an ikon of Divine Mercy.

    God bless,
    Vincent

  33. RBrown says:

    The good Cardinal, like many people with cancer, was treated and assured that they ‘got everything.’
    Comment by Little Gal —

    That wasn’t my experience with my father’s cancer. Even though they might “get everything”, that doesn’t tell the whole story.

    The surgeon, an orthopedic oncologist, said he got “really good margins” around the tumor. Then he ordered radiation treatment (for localized metastatis) and chemotherapy (for remote metastatis).

    But the surgeon and later the oncologist were always very clear about his situation: “I’m not saying it’s gone, only that it is not showing up on the scans”. Just because there are no remaining tumors, there still might be cancer cells in the body.

  34. RBrown says:

    Cardinal Law is no longer assigned to Boston. He is the Archpriest of Santa Maria Maggiore.

    If I remember correctly, Msgr Foley’s doctorate in philosophy came from the Angelicum.

  35. Tim Ferguson says:

    Since Detroit got a red hat back when we were the fourth largest city in the country (glory days not likely to be recaptured here in crumbling Motown), it would make sense to send “our” hat down to Houston, now the fourth largest city in the country. The Detroit metro area is still substantial, and still predominantly Catholic (especially when you add in the burgeoning numbers of Chaldeans here), but I would not be surprised if Maida were to be our last Cardinal.

    Yet another Michigan job gone down south to Texas :)

  36. Little Gal says:

    “That wasn’t my experience with my father’s cancer. Even though they might “get everything”, that doesn’t tell the whole story.”Comment by RBrown

    The Cardinal didn’t need any chemo or radiation…my point here is that folks make statements based on inaccurate information. Posting this information on the internet can have far reaching negative effects. FYI, the Cardinal was very open in his disclosure of his health problems. And for those of us who have seen him, he looks great. We wish him the best and continue to pray for him. I am sorry for the suffering of your father Mr. Brown, but I know that great strides have been made in treatment of cancer and there are many survivors walking around to prove it.

  37. Different says:

    Tim,

    Detroit is the 6th largest archdiocese in the country and has remained in that spot for some time.

    As for Archbishop Burke coming to Chicago, I hope he does. But make no mistake, the changes in Chicago will not happen overnight. It will take years to turn the ship around and gather speed. Cardinal George has done much good and has fixed the seminary, but he will be 71 in January so he’ll have to retire in 4 years anyway…when Archbishop Burke is 63. Makes sense to me.

  38. RBrown says:

    I am sorry for the suffering of your father Mr. Brown, but I know that great strides have been made in treatment of cancer and there are many survivors walking around to prove it.
    Comment by Little Gal

    My father was not short-changed. He was 80 when he died and had enjoyed a long, prosperous retirement.

  39. Little Gal says:

    “As for Archbishop Burke coming to Chicago,”
    Comment by Different

    IMO, this would not be an appropriate match for Chicago. Chicago,like other major metropolitan venues, requires a less polarizing approach with more finesse; it is possible to say/do much with a ‘velvet glove’ approach while working under the radar to accomplish goals.

  40. Different says:

    Little Gal,

    Certainly the soft approach was effective with Cardinal George. There are many in the archdiocese who hope for a stronger approach in the next Cardinal. The groundwork has been layed and soon it will be time for strong accountability and “administrative clean-up”. The chancery of Chicago is filled with people who openly dissent to Church teachings. I think Archbishop Burke would be particularly effective following Cardinal George, especially in growing vocations (sadly, Chicago still has VERY few vocations – of course, that is what happens when an anti-priest nun is vocations director…Thank God that changed!)

  41. Little Gal says:

    “I think Archbishop Burke would be particularly effective following Cardinal George, especially in growing vocations (sadly, Chicago still has VERY few vocations – of course, that is what happens when an anti-priest nun is vocations director…Thank God that changed!)”

    Comment by Different — 18 October 2007 @ 12:54 pm

    Different,I suppose my first question is whether you even live in Chicago. Do you? Secondly,the information that you have provided is not only inaccurate, but uncharitable. FYI, a priest has been in charge of vocations for diocesian priests since 2001. Why make the negative statement about sister…especially on the internet?

  42. matt says:

    Hi Vincent,

    I think your assessment is too harsh.

    Not an assesment, just identifying some facts, I have made no conclusion.

    Archbishop DiNardo walked into a disaster zone in Galveston-Houston, and some of the first things he did as Coadjutor included praying with and saying masses for the various Pro-Life Apostolates in Houston.

    Very true, but his diocese is still very weak on the pro-life front, and as I pointed out the chancery places a far higher emphasis on illegal immigration than murdered babies. I don’t know if that reflects the Abp.’s position but he has been in charge long enough to do something about it. Do you disagree with this?


    He has given support and encouragement to orthodox groups like “Fullness of Truth” and other efforts that did not have such support before.

    He also has given tremendous support to converts like me (an ex-Anglican priest) and to the Anglican Use parish of Our Lady of Walsingham.

    All very good things but hardly controversial.

    His hallmark is fidelity to the Holy Father. He does not engage in innovations of his own, and he has turned the ship of the Archdiocese back toward the safe harbour of Rome. There is still a lot of sailing ahead, but there couldn’t be a better captain for it. He isn’t throwing people overboard, and with those whose formation was so “American Catholic” he has made extraordinary efforts to keep them from jumping ship (or jumping the shark).

    Some of our bishops like Archbishop Burke reveal—like an ikon—the Divine Will. Archbishop DiNardo is rather more of an ikon of Divine Mercy.

    A shepherd has to fight off the wolves, and allowing them to continue feeding on his sheep is not a good thing, nor is it merciful.

    What’s his stance on pro-abortion politicians recieving communion? What about the PRO-ABORTION politician on the board of Catholic Charities? What about the pagan nuns at Almeda and the Cenacle? What about the pro-gay pastor running one of the largest parishes in the city?

    Like I said, the bishop preaches orthodoxy, but he doesn’t take action.

    God Bless,

    Matt

  43. Michael C. says:

    St. Louis will have its Cardinal again, hopefully it will be His Grace, Archbishop Burke.