Is this some kind of joke?

Emory University is having a Summit on Religion, Conflict, and Peacebuilding sponsored together with the International Summer School in Religion and Public Life.

The respondents….

For Islam: Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im

For Judaism: David Rosen

For Hinduism: Rajmohan Gandhi

And for Christianity…. I am not making this up…. Sister Joan Chittister!

You remember her. 

 

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33 Responses to Is this some kind of joke?

  1. Jonathan Bennett says:

    You mean she hasnt been burned at the stake yet?

  2. Jonathan Bennett says:

    You mean she hasnt been burned at the stake yet?

    You think she is going to wear her habit to this meeting?

  3. Rose in NE says:

    Can’t be a joke–it’s not funny. On the other hand, it is difficult to take this woman seriously.

  4. anne scanlon says:

    I am not surprised….she and others of her ‘confusion’ are gasping for breath…desparate for a new audience..

  5. Christopher says:

    Peace be with you.

    I do not think this is a joke. I learned this from the testimony (public, and me in the midst) of another sister of that same house. Apparently, in recent memory, during this year’s “Day of Peace,” the Benedictine house had fasted for peace… commendable- albeit, it seems misguided for the peace prayed for really only occurs in the time following the End Days and isn’t for this time. It concluded with a prayer service (inter-religious) at the house, where a muslim prayed something in Arabic (it was omitted from testimony what the prayer actually said and where it was from, though said not to be “ojectionable”) and a Jew sounded the Shofar for the call to prayer that evening. There were also other religious groups present.

    May God bless you.
    Holy Mary protect you.
    -Christopher

  6. Henry Edwards says:

    Jonathon: You think she is going to wear her habit to this meeting?

    I doubt that she still has one.

    Unlike Fr. Richard McBrien, who rummages around to dig out a Roman collar to wear whenever scheduled for a TV appearance as ubiquitous Church spokesman.

  7. Garrett says:

    Emory, Emory Emory. Tisk tisk tisk. I’m from Atlanta and this doesn’t really surprise me. Emory’s a liberal Yankee institution that just happens to be situated in the Deep South.

  8. William says:

    I just googled the others and they all seem to be liberals in their respective religions. So they’ll probably end up agreeing that there’s no real difference between them.

  9. Oh, gawd! This like when the media goes and looks to people like Father Richard McBrien for the “Catholic” perspective. Please.
    We need to get a branding iron to mark these people with a sign “Warning! this person does not actually represent the Catholic faith.”

    Not that I would expect Emory to be a bastion of conservativism.
    Here’s something interesting. I looked at Emory University’s website under the section “About us” and, I am not making this up, it says:
    “Located just 15 minutes from downtown Atlanta in the tree-lined suburban neighborhood of Druid Hills…” [my emphasis]

  10. Robert says:

    Yeah, NPR had her on too. It just makes you laugh.

  11. Garrett says:

    I was born in Druid Hills. It is just the name of the area. It has nothing to do with the people there. The people
    there are totally normal, regular people.

    The Virginia Highlands area is right next to it, but it doens’t mean it’s in Virginia!

  12. ForgivetheAnon says:

    So… any constructive advice for conservative Catholic students at Emory having to deal with the inevitable misrepresentation of our faith?

  13. ForgivetheAnon says:

    By the bye, the Dalai Llama will be there as well, so this is actually a *very* big forum.

  14. You just can’t make up this kind of stuff!

  15. Chris Garton-Zavesky says:

    Isn’t Sister’s plugging for Christianity rather like Salman Rushdie plugging for Islam?

  16. michigancatholic says:

    Honestly, most people no longer hear the good & faithful about Christianity. They only hear about the perverts and social activists. Meanwhile Catholics don’t step out with a portrait of the good. It may be our own fault.

  17. Trad Tom says:

    Oh, my God! And I mean that as a short prayer, not taking God’s name in vain. What will it take to rid the country/world of the “Sister” Joan Chittisters?

  18. michigancatholic says:

    A little time will do it, Tom. They’re a dying breed.

    Younger people pay a much higher price if they go into religious orders. Therefore, they actually believe the content of religious life as a general rule, unlike the folks in Sr C’s generation, who did it for other reasons. (desire to cover up or avoid deviant psychological behavior, mommy wanted a nun for a daughter, was little miss perfect and was following a role, hatred for men, afraid to have kids, didn’t want a career, wanted to be a feminist social activist, etc etc etc)

    Younger ones are far more conscious of the fact that it involves….gasp….God. ;)

  19. michigancatholic says:

    Correction: \”unlike the folks in Sr C’s generation, SOME OF WHOM who did it for other reasons.\” There are good and holy sisters in every generation, and of course, some did go into it for the right reasons. We owe them our respect and gratitude.

    However, we\’ve all witnessed the polarization and collapse of many women\’s religious orders. That collapse was not an isolated event. When the social pressures & mores of society changed in the latter half of the 20th century, the reasons for entering and the reasons for abiding by the traditional charisms of religious orders evaporated and voila! Some sisters left; some morphed. Sr C and her crowd morphed. It avoided the \”saving for retirement\” problem for them.

  20. Sid Cundiff says:

    Emory’s Divinity School is United Methodist, one of the most “liberal” of the “Liberal” Mainline Protestant churches, along with the United Church of Christ and the Unitarians. It is “liberal” in the sense of both 19th Century Liberal German Protestantism, with its roots in David Strauß, and also American Social Gospel. That Emory should choose a “Catholic” identical to themselves – Liberation Theologian (Marxist), Radical Feminist (Sexual Revolutionary), Neo-Modernist, and Clown Mass advocate – is par for the course. To place her with the advocates of “Californianity” – pseudo-multiculturalism and a superficial attraction to the religions of South Asia, the Far East, pantheism, and Pop Psychology – fills the bill. Thus dialogue among religions become just a kind of monologue. No joke, at least to themselves.

  21. William says:

    Yeah, NPR had her on too. It just makes you laugh.

    The Chittister interview on the NPR “religious” program was quite interesting. Her father died when she was three and then her “Catholic” mother married a protestant. They agreed to raise little Joan as a “Catholic”. She had a traumatic experience at school when Sister told her that her stepdad would end up in Hell. But Joan’s mommy told her that stepdad was a good man and God wouldn’t send him to Hell. So already at a very young age little Joan realized that the doctrines of the Catholic Church are dispensable.

    When asked about the Benedictine Rule, and what it is like to live by a monastic rule, she said that the word “rule” didn’t mean the same thing “back then” that it does now. Now we think of a “rule” as being something that must be obeyed strictly, while “back then” it was a spiritual guideline that didn’t compel any particular behavior as long as you were following the spirit of the rule. So by ignoring the provisions of the Rule, she is actually following the Rule.

    Similarly, she explained how one used to think of “obedience” as requiring conformity to some externally imposed obligation, whereas now we realize that true obedience is “obedience to the inspirations of the spirit”, so that she can now fulfill her vow of obedience by dissenting against Catholic dogma, refusing to submit herself to her lawful superiors, and just generally doing whatever she wants to do.

  22. RBrown says:

    Liberals like Sr JC always invoke that part of the Rule where Benedict says that if anyone has a better way of arranging things, let him follow it.

    Here is the text from the Rule, Ch XVIII, “In What Order the Psalms Are to Be Said”

    We especially impress this, that, if this distribution of the psalms should perchance displease anyone, he arrange them if he thinketh another better, by all means seeing to it that the whole Psalter of one hundred and fifty psalms be said every week, and that it always start again from the beginning at Matins on Sunday; because those monks show too lax a service in their devotion who in the course of a week chant less than the whole Psalter with is customary canticles; since we read, that our holy forefathers promptly fulfilled in one day what we lukewarm monks should, please God, perform at least in a week.

    Anyone dumb enough to think that Sr Chittister’s community uses the weekly Psalter, i.e., all 150 every week?

    The genius of Benedictine monasticism is that the life is centered not on mortification but on conformity to the regularity of the Office (“Seven times a day I have praised you” PLUS the Office of Matins). Once a monastery renounces the weekly Psalter, it seriously undermines the very essence of the Benedictine life . . . and is Benedictine in name only.

  23. FrJT says:

    The Dalai Lama will be there? Probably the closest Sr. Joan’s ever going to get to someone styled “His Holiness”.

  24. Garrett says:

    Sid,

    I think that’s a bit unfair of United Methodism. I grew up United Methodist (and converted three years ago at the age
    of 17), and can tell you Presbyterians, many Lutheran denominations, and Episcopalians are far more liberal. Actively gay clergy
    isn’t allowed in United Methodist churches. Same-sex marriages are not performed, etc.

    My parents were wed in the United Methodist chapel at Emory University.

  25. Delaney says:

    “She had a traumatic experience at school when Sister told her that her stepdad would end up in Hell. But Joan’s mommy told her that stepdad was a good man and God wouldn’t send him to Hell. So already at a very young age little Joan realized that the doctrines of the Catholic Church are dispensable.”

    You, know, my grandfather was a good, Christian man who happened to be baptized a Methodist. There is nothing that my grandfather did during his life that would lead me to believe that Our Lord would condemn him to an eternity of hell. Furthermore, I devoutly believe that when Our Lady tells us to pray the rosary for the salvation of sinners and we pray over and over again “Pray for us now and at the hour of our death,” the “us” means EVERYONE, Catholic, Protestant, Muslim, atheist and so on, as long as the “us” can walk, talk and chew gum. Our Lord told us in the Gospels that we must be baptized – but we don’t control time – he does. How do you know that in the last nanosecod of life, as a soul is leaving his body and meets the Lord, that Our Lord touches them and that there is not a “baptism of desire” that occurs if there was no actual baptism during life? And what about the Father a house of “many mansions?” William, I am leaving the “Judgement” to the Lord and hope you do the same, while we pray, pray, pray for all.

  26. michigancatholic says:

    Well, I think I will obey \”the inspirations of the spirit\” now and have a piece of pie.

    What Sr. C has said has no more content than what I just said about pie. She is saying that, essentially, one can guide their own path as they see fit. Period. One doesn\’t need religion for that. Maybe she\’s hiding out behind her order to avoid paying for her own groceries. What\’dya think?

  27. michigancatholic says:

    Delaney, it is not up to you to make the judgment about who goes to heaven and who goes to hell. The church has the final word on that. See Dominus Iesus.

  28. joe says:

    Out of curiosity…what branch of Christianity does Sister represent?

    -J.

  29. To quote Jonathan Quail Higgins, “Oh! My! God!”

  30. RBrown says:

    Similarly, she explained how one used to think of “obedience” as requiring conformity to some externally imposed obligation, whereas now we realize that true obedience is “obedience to the inspirations of the spirit”, so that she can now fulfill her vow of obedience by dissenting against Catholic dogma, refusing to submit herself to her lawful superiors, and just generally doing whatever she wants to do.
    Comment by William

    As I’ve said before, almost every liberal mind is trying to circumvent a scrupulous, tyrannical conscience that is preoccupied with small, relatively minor obligations.

  31. William says:

    You, know, my grandfather was a good, Christian man who happened to be baptized a Methodist. There is nothing that my grandfather did during his life that would lead me to believe that Our Lord would condemn him to an eternity of hell.

    Surely you are not claiming that your grandfather lived his life without mortal sin, are you?

    Now assuming that a protestant, even a good, Christian man, has at some time in his life committed mortal sin, then that person is in extreme danger. The Baltimore Catechism teaches us that such persons can be saved in some cases, and so I don’t doubt that such a person may avoid eternity in Hell. But without access to the sacrament of penance it will be difficult, our desires to the contrary notwithstanding.

    As for me, my entire immediate family is protestant, so I know where you are coming from.

  32. I was born in Druid Hills. It is just the name of the area. It has nothing to do with the people there. The people there are totally normal, regular people. The Virginia Highlands area is right next to it, but it doens’t mean it’s in Virginia!

    It was just a joke, I didn’t think anyone would actually take that seriously. I found the name to be rather appropriate and amusing for the situation, that’s all.

  33. RBrown says:

    Now assuming that a protestant, even a good, Christian man, has at some time in his life committed mortal sin, then that person is in extreme danger. The Baltimore Catechism teaches us that such persons can be saved in some cases, and so I don’t doubt that such a person may avoid eternity in Hell. But without access to the sacrament of penance it will be difficult, our desires to the contrary notwithstanding.

    Acc to St Thomas Aquinas Christ is the Principal celebrant in every celebration of every Sacrament, and the proper minister is His instrument. That is why it is POSSIBLE to receive the fruits of a Sacrament outside of its celebration (cf. CCC 1258) even though the Sacraments are NECESSARY for salvaion.

    NB: The word “Sacrament” is the Latin version of the Greek “musterion”–mystery.

    As for me, my entire immediate family is protestant, so I know where you are coming from.
    Comment by William

    Mine also. And my father was a born again agnostic.