Cool tech story: T-DMB pilot for Vatican Radio

Do you remember the story in Matthew 13 about how Jesus taught the crowds?

They were along the shore and a large crowds of people were pressing in.  So, the Lord sat in a little boat and the disciples let it out onto the water with a rope so that he could teach more people at one time.

This was the first "online" evangelization effort, in a sense. 

Since then, the Church has tried in every age to use the best means of social communication to fulfill her duty to "teach all nations" and make Christ known and loved. 

So I read with great interest this story:

Vatican starts T-DMB pilot in the holy city
Posted in Mobile TV, Newsline, Technology by Robert Briel on November 5th, 2007, 11:38 am

Vatican Radio has started a pilot with T-DMB broadcasts in the city state with help from the Korean government. “With an encoder offered by us, Vatican Radio launched a test run of T-DMB. The radio station is to embark on full-fledged services in October,” ministry official Lee Jung-gu said to The Korea Times. “We are upbeat because the voices and images of the Pope are delivered via our technologies. We hope this will give momentum to T-DMB,” Lee added.

Korea has gone all-out to encourage the Vatican to adopt T-DMB. President Roh Moo-hyun presented 100 T-DMB-enabled terminals in February when he visited the world’s smallest independent nation.

T-DMB is a digital radio transmission that can send radio, video and data to mobile phones.    

Remember that the Holy See was on the cutting edge of radio to begin with.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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One Response to Cool tech story: T-DMB pilot for Vatican Radio

  1. Derik Castillo says:

    I am not a cell phone user, but I would like to know
    what kind of phone is designed to pick up that signal.

    Great move by the Vatican. I think mobile devices are
    a good oportunity to send bits of chatechism.

    Derik