Let’s see your vestments

In another entry we discussed the actual color of Roman liturgical rosacea.

It occured to me that we might like seeing what vestments are out there.

Send those photos!

WDTPRS reader Fr. K sent me a photo of a rose vestment used at his parish.

 

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20 Responses to Let’s see your vestments

  1. Mike says:

    The set we use (chasuble and dalmatic) is the ‘Whitland’ set from the Holy Rood Guild (http://www.holyroodguild.com/Whitland-p-16317.html). We use this set for both Gaudete and Laetare Sundays. The color shown in the picture is not exactly what it looks like in person, and I do think it’s rather close to liturgical rosacea.

  2. Henry Edwards says:

    The following pictures of our pink (rather than rosacia) set were taken last Laetare:

    http://www.knoxlatinmass.net/gallery/Laetare2006/Laetare.htm

  3. Jason in San Antonio says:

    Mr. Edwards: I like what you all have done with the free-standing altar.

    Our pastor in San Antonio, Texas, recently invested in a nice set of rose vestments.

  4. Henry Edwards says:

    Thanks, Jason. The photo

    shows our altar setup in a bit more detail. (At that time we had only 4 matching altar candles available, but now have the full complement of 6 for high Mass.)

  5. Cathy2 says:

    I’ve never seen anything but violet on the third Sunday in our town parishes, but I had a surprise this last Sunday. Our pastor wore RED! I guess it is as close to rose as blue is to violet.

    Hey, I hear black is the new white. Can’t wait for Christmas.

  6. Sylvia says:

    Last Sunday I attended mass at my mom’s parish and saw these vestments live and in person: http://atonementparish.blogspot.com

  7. Jimmy G. says:

    I think I saw a vestment that looks like that this past Sunday! It was beautiful indeed.

    In regards to Henry\’s photos, I have long been long wondering is the enforcement of a specific rubric. I recall a rubric of the 1962 Missale Romanum that specifies that one of the altar cloths must be able to reach the ground. Just how necessary is it to follow that?

    Pax,
    Jimmy

  8. Legisperitus says:

    Our Mass vestments look somewhat like Sylvia’s and are about the same color. Our cope, however, is more the color of Fr. K’s chasuble and has a green lining.

  9. Henry Edwards says:

    Jimmy: That photo was taken at our 3rd indult Mass a couple of years ago, and we had to use the parish altar cloth that was already on the altar that Sunday. Since then our Latin Mass community has acquired its own altar cloths that accord better with the rubric you mentioned.

    In starting a TLM from scratch in an area that hadn’t seen one for several decades, we found that rubrics sometimes must defer (at least temporarily) to financial realities. For instance, I mentioned that our parish only had 4 altar candlesticks when we started. Despite a concern expressed by one singular individual as to whether high Mass was licit without 6 candles on the altar, we had to await a “pious benefactor” to acquire the matching set of 6 beautiful candlesticks you see here:

    http://www.knoxlatinmass.net/gallery/IMG_9401_7x5.jpg

    Incidentally, you can see here just a sliver of the purple chasuble’s silk lining, which to the naked eye is a true rosacea (i.e., more salmon than the pink that appears on my monitor in the photo).

  10. Gustavo Ráez-Patiño says:

    Speaking of rose vestments, does anybody know why our Holy Father didn’t use rose ones last Sunday in his visit to a roman parish?

    I noticed that it was a Mass with an altar consecration. Does that make white vestments mandatory? I thought that Lent and Advent Sundays had the highest priority in the liturgical range.

    Besides, now that the Holy Father is always wearing a pontifical dalmatic below his chasuble, this was a lost opportunity for me to see for the first time a rose one…

  11. here’s a link to what Fr. Perrone wore last year @ the Assumption Grotto in Detroit.

    http://thecrescat.blogspot.com/2007/12/gaudette.html

    I’m not fancy and don’t know how to post an image in the comment box.

  12. Matthew Mattingly says:

    I love the “Canary Yellow” vestments. Never saw that before!

  13. Cathy2 says:

    [Where are the formatting instructions for this site?]

  14. Dove says:

    I think that those “canary yellow” vestments are really gold.

  15. Derik Castillo says:

    The color in the vestment from Fr. K.
    can be translated to the RGB scale.
    it seem to be between

    R=191, G=132, B=152
    and
    R=158, G=93, B=117
    depending where the measurement is taken

    The color of the burse from the picture by
    Henry Edwards
    seems to be between
    R=197, G=115, B=103
    and
    R=234, G=157, B=147

    The color of the vestment from the picture by Sylvia
    seems to be between

    R=185, G=106, B=111
    and
    R=131, G=50, B=56

    Sorry for being so quantitative about the color,
    but I am colorblind.

    I hope this helps the comparison among
    vestments

    Derik the protanope

  16. Tim Ferguson says:

    Actually Derik, that’s very helpful. Though I’m not colorblind, I do have some difficulty picking up the subtle differences between shades that I know are there. It’s incredibly cool to know that they differences can be scientifically quantified.

  17. Henry Edwards says:

    Tim: It’s incredibly cool to know that they differences can be scientifically quantified.

    And fortunate, since otherwise colors could not be digitally recorded and displayed, and our digital world would be sorely color-challenged.

  18. Jamie says:

    For those of you with photoshop, you can make sure we all see the same color you see with color profiles. You should set your photo’s color profile to Adobe RGB rather than sRGB (default on Windows) – then adjust the colors to how you see them in real life and save the image with the profile embedded. Most modern browsers will use the embedded color profile to render the image in the correct colors.

  19. David Kubiak says:

    Although I don’t think many cardinals were still doing it at the time of the reforms, they were supposed to have a set of choir clothes, complete with cappa, in rose, which were worn exactly twice a year.

  20. This is in from Melbourne via RM and the NLM blog:

     

    That looks like a pretty good shade of rose Bp. Elliot is wearing.  Nice vestment!