Tuesday of the 2nd Week of Advent

Today we will continue our Advent preparation with a look at today’s

COLLECT:
Deus, qui salutare tuum cunctis terrae finibus declarasti,
tribue, quaesumus,
ut nativitatis eius gloriam laetanter praesolemur.

The wonderfully apt verb praestolor, deponent (passive in form but active in meaning), is "to stand ready for, to wait for, expect a person or thing".

LITERAL VERSION:
O God, who made known Your salvation to all the ends of the earth,
grant, we entreat You,
that we may in joyful expectation await the glory of His Nativity.

SOMEONE ELSE’S VERSION:
O God,
who have shown forth your salvation
to all the ends of the earth,
grant, we pray,
that we may await in joy
the glory of his birth.

God found ways through the history of salvation to make His salvation known through signs and revelation and even in the workings of the human mind. 

Before the Nativity of the Lord, He showed signs to the Jews and, in the persons of the Magi, to all the nations.  There were even, perhaps, prophecies of the event among Roman writers, if some are to be believed. 

Ever since, Holy Church has been announcing the Good News to the ends of the earth.  

This Collect reminds us to prepare ourselves well for the coming of the Lord as Judge, and not just as the Infant of Bethlehem.  We also, as baptized Christians, have the obligation in our words and deeds to make known the fact that the Good News of salvation has had more than a merely superficial impact on our lives. 

Remember: while God gives everyone sufficient means for salvation, not all will be saved. 

We can help those who must struggle with an incomplete understanding of God’s gifts to know more about His plan. 

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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2 Responses to Tuesday of the 2nd Week of Advent

  1. mike says:

    What does this mean -??

    “There were even, perhaps, prophecies of the event among Roman writers, if some are to be believed.”

    m

  2. Angelo says:

    Mike,

    Vergil’s (70B.C.-19B.B.C.) Eclogue IV