Benedict XVI: Questions and Answers

Our friend Amy over at Charlotte was both has pointed out some interesting news about a new volume of Pope Benedict XVI called Questions and Answers

This is a book of, you guessed it, Q and A sessions Pope Benedict had with various groups, young people, priests, etc. 

It was published by Our Sunday Visitor.

Apparently this little book has received some recognition. 

It is good that people will be able to get a feeling for how Pope Benedict, unlike any of his predecessors breaks the mould in such encounters.  You get a real sense of the fellow when he speaks like this.

On a personal note, I did a lot of the footnotes for the book, mostly explaining Latin terms or phrases used by the Pope and left in Latin in the English translation. 

It is great to be able to participate in a good project like this. I hope for a long Pontificate and, therefore, more of these volumes in the future!

It would be a good book for young people.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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4 Responses to Benedict XVI: Questions and Answers

  1. Hettie B. says:

    I too hope and pray for a long pontificate for Pope Benedict. He is such an exquisite teacher, and a very kind teacher, who is good at communicating to different kinds of people in the manner appropriate to them. He never talks down to anybody or insults their intelligence… as an ordinary layperson, I really appreciate that!

    I love the way he has been bringing us back to the basics of our faith: the theological virtues, the Eucharist, the person of Jesus, the traditions of liturgy, the reality of absolute truth, etc.

    May God bless him with good health and long life, and protect him during his travels to and from the U.S. I hope that all Americans will receive his messages with open minds and hearts.

  2. Jeff Pinyan says:

    This question breaks my heart: “Your Holiness, everyone tells us that it is important to go to Mass on Sunday. We would gladly go to it, but often our parents do not take us because on Sundays they sleep. … Could you say something to them, to make them understand that it is important to go to Mass together on Sundays?”

  3. Royce says:

    When did C.S. Lewis’s works become Catholic?

  4. pattif says:

    I am constantly reminded of the comment by Cardinal Meisner on the election of Pope Benedict which, from memory, went something like this: “I looked at my friend, who has the mind of 12 professors and the faith of a child on the day of his First Holy Communion…”

    For me, this sums up the genius of the Holy Father. Another example is the reply he gave to the question Jeff found so heartreaking:
    “I would think so, of course, with great love and great respect for your parents, because they certainly have a lot to do. However, with a daughter’s respect and love, you could say to them: ‘Dear Mommy, dear Daddy, it is so important for us all, even for you, to meet Jesus. This encounter enriches us. It is an important element in our lives. Let’s find a little time together, we can find an opportunity. Perhaps there is also a possibility where Grandmom lives”. In brief, I would say, with great love and respect for your parents, I would tell them: “Please understand that this is not only important for me, it is not only catechists who say it, it is important for us all. And it will be the light of Sunday for all our family’”.

    God bless our Pope.