Castel Gandolfo, or, What Papa did on his summer vacation

The Holy Father has transferred his flag to the papal Summer Residence at Castel Gandolfo, in the Castelli Romani.

On arriving he was greeted, as you might expect, by crowds.  He didn’t go out on the balcony, but he did charge out the front door for a bit.

 

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40 Responses to Castel Gandolfo, or, What Papa did on his summer vacation

  1. Steven says:

    There are interesting rumors in the Italian press: Will the Holy Father change the ordinary form of the Mass?

    http://dagospia.excite.it/articolo_index_41774.html

  2. Jon says:

    Steven,

    Fascinating. I have absolutely no proficiency in Italian, but given my exclusive attendance at the TLM the last three years, I can kind of decipher (Latin is the gift that keeps on giving) that the Holy Father intends to

    1. Require the consecration at the Novus Ordo and all sacramental formulae in the ordinary form be always be in Latin.

    2. That the Sign of Peace be moved to the Offertory, as in the Ambrosian Rite.

    3. Make mandatory the “Benedictine” altar arrangement.

    4. Make mandatory reception of Holy Communion on the tongue to the kneeling.

    5. Make mandatory celebration ad orientem.

    How’s that?

    All of that would be wonderful, of course. I also pray he’d address the herds of Extraordinary Ministers and revisit permission for girl altar boys.

    Hopefully when Archbishop Ranjith becomes Prefect of CDWS he’ll waste no time! ;^)

  3. Vox Cantor says:

    I recall a video on You Tube by Bishop Bernard Fellay of the SSPX. It was from May of 2007 from there Oregon chapel; he was giving a conference. He was not to confident thent hat tthere would even be the motu proprio which came, thanks be to God, not long thereafter.

    However, in this lecture he said, if I can paraphrase, “about a year ago spring 2006) he was aware that a high-level panel was working on a new Missal for the Novus Ordo to repair the damage and make it more “Catholic”. Essentially, it involved fewer options, though one option would be using the “Offertory” from the 1962 Missal in the vernacular in the Novus Ordo and the
    suppression of all Eucharistic Prayers except EPI, the Roman Canon and EPIII.
    The three year lectionary would remain.

    If this were to happen, it would make sense and it would coincide with the new Vox Clara Commission translation including the “pro multis.”

    Could this then be true?

    Could we also be on the verge of the elimination of the indult for Communion
    in the hand and a strong push or even mandatory “ad orientem” celebration?

    If the above happens, would that not be a “Novus Ordo” that the SSPX, while
    not required to celebrate, could accept without theological reservation?

    It all seems to be coming together, brick by brick!

  4. Jack Regan says:

    I very much doubt it. These changes would simply be massive and while the Holy Father may want these things I think he gets that if you move too fast, you risk a lot of people falling off. There would also be massive disobedience.

    Also, ad orientem was never mandatory even before 1970, was it??

  5. Jack Regan says:

    Personally I hope the following stays in the Mass:

    -Priest facing the congregation (with reverence of course)
    -Modern music (if done reverently, appropriately and with good theology)
    -Lay readers (including women. As long as lay readers respect and understand the importance of what they’re doing, and do it well)
    -Altar girls (ditto)
    -EMHCs (when actually needed, and they must be properly trained and they must be committed Catholics)
    -Use of the vernacular throughout
    -Reception of communion in the hand, while standing (again, if done very reverently)

    I’d be okay with moving the sign of peace.

    I will now duck under a table while I am ripped to shreds. By all means, enjoy yourselves!

  6. Jenny Z says:

    Jack,
    Everyone has opinions, but some people are more wrong than others ;)

    (I’m totally joking… though I do disagree with you on all points)

  7. Jon says:

    Jack,

    I know you want to see fireworks, but I think you have your holidays mixed up. April FIRST was three months ago. Tomorrow’s July FOURTH!

  8. Jack Regan says:

    We were never really going to agree on that one really were we

    :-)

    Also, I’m British. For us tomorrow is just another Friday.

  9. This is interesting….although here’s a list of things I’d love to see.

    no Communion in the Hand and a return to kneeling. (for those that are physically able to of course)
    no Versus Populum…(except where the altars are on the West end of the Church)
    no EP II, IV
    Benedictne Altar Arrangement (in places where the Tabernacle is NOT in the center)
    Axing of the Sign of Peace (or as mentioed, moving it to the offeratory)
    Axing of the Prayers of the Faithful (well, all the lame ones, the one’s we here in America anyway, for world peace without Christ, for protestnts to stay protestant, for “social justice” anyway)
    Use of Latin at the consecration, Gloria, Sanctus, Agnus Dei and any Sacraments as well as for Benediction.
    Supression of EOMHC’s during Mass
    Having anyone who serves at the altar in some type of wear (I lose track of the word I want to use). For women, veils of course. Just like EWTN.

    Brick by brick…oremus

  10. Jack Regan says:

    And what do you think the reaction to that will be?

    And I don’t mean from Traditionalists. I mean from the other 99% of the Church.

  11. RBrown says:

    I very much doubt it. These changes would simply be massive and while the Holy Father may want these things I think he gets that if you move too fast, you risk a lot of people falling off. There would also be massive disobedience.
    Also, ad orientem was never mandatory even before 1970, was it??
    Comment by Jack Regan

    It wouldn’t surprise me if things start to happen quickly because:

    1. BXVI spent over 20 years in the Vatican before he became pope. He is very smart, aware of the situation in the Church, and has already decided what the Church needs.

    2. BXVI made his views known before the conclave. He made no attempt to mislead Cardinals. The result was a quick election to the papacy.

    2. BXVI is 81 years old and knows he doesn’t have much time.

    3. BXVI is a German, and Germans are given to direct action rather than ducking, weaving and maneuvering.

    4. BXVI knows the Church is a mess and knows time is wasting.

    5. BXVI thinks that a lot of people have already fallen off, but still are permitted to pretend they are Catholic.

    6. BXVI knows there already is massive disobedience.

    7. NB: Within a year the Vatican has moved from permitting the use of the 1962 Missal to Cardinal Castrillon saying that plans are for it to be made available in every parish.

  12. RBrown says:

    Personally I hope the following stays in the Mass:

    -Priest facing the congregation (with reverence of course)
    -Modern music (if done reverently, appropriately and with good theology)
    -Lay readers (including women. As long as lay readers respect and understand the importance of what they’re doing, and do it well)
    -Altar girls (ditto)
    -EMHCs (when actually needed, and they must be properly trained and they must be committed Catholics)
    -Use of the vernacular throughout
    -Reception of communion in the hand, while standing (again, if done very reverently)

    I will now duck under a table while I am ripped to shreds. By all means, enjoy yourselves!
    Comment by Jack Regan

    A very simple answer suffices: What you like has been tried and found to be a pastoral flop.

  13. Jack Regan says:

    *What you like has been tried and found to be a pastoral flop.*

    Well that’s a subjective view isn’t it. Personally I don’t think that falling Mass attendance is due to the new Mass, but hey, we’ll probably never agree on that one.

    As somebody who works for the Church in a ministry role, I will take whatever the Holy Father decides and try to make it work. I do think that the proposed changes will make it harder though.

  14. Jack Regan says:

    *It wouldn’t surprise me if things start to happen quickly*
    There would be a split in the Church that would make SSPX look like a minor disagreement. The Holy Father knows that very very well.

    This week we were rejoicing about the Transalpine Redemptorists coming back into the Church; a community or… erm… about 20 guys. If the Pope changes the Mass back too much then I firmly believe that tens of millions will leave. I won’t be one of them, but there will be lots.

  15. Ottaviani says:

    If the Pope changes the Mass back too much then I firmly believe that tens of millions will leave.

    Pity Paul VI didn’t think this one through before he changed the mass in 1969.

  16. RBrown says:

    Well that’s a subjective view isn’t it. Personally I don’t think that falling Mass attendance is due to the new Mass, but hey, we’ll probably never agree on that one.

    What’s subjective about empty churches, seminaries, and religious houses? What’s subjective about Baptized Catholics rejecting doctrine?

    As somebody who works for the Church in a ministry role, I will take whatever the Holy Father decides and try to make it work. I do think that the proposed changes will make it harder though.
    Comment by Jack Regan

    Harder how?

  17. Habemus Papam says:

    “There would be a split in the Church”. I’m sure similar threats were made before Summorum Pontificum.

  18. Jack Regan says:

    *Harder how?*

    Do you work in a pastoral field?

    *What’s subjective about empty churches, seminaries, and religious houses?*

    The cause!

    *Pity Paul VI didn’t think this one through before he changed the mass in 1969.*

    No, he didn’t. And he was wrong to push things through so quickly. But two wrongs don’t make a right.

  19. Jack Regan says:

    *“There would be a split in the Church”. I’m sure similar threats were made before Summorum Pontificum.*

    But SP didn’t force changes on people. Rather, it made the EF available to those who wanted it.

  20. RBrown says:

    There would be a split in the Church that would make SSPX look like a minor disagreement. The Holy Father knows that very very well.

    This week we were rejoicing about the Transalpine Redemptorists coming back into the Church; a community or… erm… about 20 guys. If the Pope changes the Mass back too much then I firmly believe that tens of millions will leave. I won’t be one of them, but there will be lots.
    Comment by Jack Regan

    You sound like Neville Chamberlain

  21. Habemus Papam says:

    No Jack Regan, the EF is not available to those who want it. Novus Ordo Bishops have seen to that. It would not surprise me at all that, having witnessed their truculance at first hand the Holy Father is about to come down hard on those who disobey him.

  22. Jack Regan says:

    Jeez… are you really comparing the Holy Father’s plans with the Second World War?

  23. RBrown says:

    Harder how?
    Do you work in a pastoral field?

    I’ve said here more than once that I have all the relevant Pontifical theology degrees from a Roman university and have taught in seminary.

    What’s subjective about empty churches, seminaries, and religious houses?
    The cause!

    Here’s BXVI on the cause:

    ‘I am convinced,’ wrote Cardinal Ratzinger, ‘that the crisis in the Church that we are experiencing today is to a large extent due to the disintegration of the liturgy…’. ”


    Pity Paul VI didn’t think this one through before he changed the mass in 1969.
    No, he didn’t. And he was wrong to push things through so quickly. But two wrongs don’t make a right.
    Comment by Jack Regan

    Disagree. The Novus Ordo (and vernacular liturgy) was thoroughly considered. It was intended to be intended to be used by both Cathlolics and Protestants.

  24. Jack Regan says:

    *No Jack Regan, the EF is not available to those who want it.*

    My point was that SP did not take anything away from anyone.

    *It would not surprise me at all that, having witnessed their truculance at first hand the Holy Father is about to come down hard on those who disobey him.*

    Sadly, I think you’re right. But I wander what the response will be.

    I’m not necessarily saying this is right, but I can imagine the reaction. The Holy Father makes sudden changes to the liturgy. The priests en mass (no pun intended) say no. The Bishops don’t do anything to enforce it. And the Holy See is further from it’s people than ever and the Church is more split than ever.

  25. RBrown says:

    Jeez… are you really comparing the Holy Father’s plans with the Second World War?
    Comment by Jack Regan

    No, I’m comparing Chamberlain’s weak-kneed response to yours.

  26. RBrown says:

    I’m not necessarily saying this is right, but I can imagine the reaction. The Holy Father makes sudden changes to the liturgy. The priests en mass (no pun intended) say no. The Bishops don’t do anything to enforce it. And the Holy See is further from it’s people than ever and the Church is more split than ever.
    Comment by Jack Regan

    If that is the reaction, then it is an indictment of the papacy of JPII.

  27. Jack Regan says:

    Well, let’s see if this stuff happens first. As I understand it we are at the very early stages. First there will be a study, then a document, then the implementation of the document. It’s certainly not going to be tomorrow, is it?

    Now what *will* be interesting is the next Pope. If he is a Traditionalist in the same mind of BXVI then things will continue at pace. If, on the other hand, the Cardinals are currently secretly thinking “oops” then the next Pope might not be so keen on reforming things back.

    As with all things, time will tell…

    Goodnight!

  28. Jack Regan says:

    *If that is the reaction, then it is an indictment of the papacy of JPII.*

    Well, if you don’t like JP2 then of course it will. But if you do, then it will probably reflect badly on BXVI. I guess it’s about perspectives at the end of the day.

    Anyway, I’m tired. Bedtime :)

  29. Jack Regan says:

    *No, I’m comparing Chamberlain’s weak-kneed response to yours.*

    Yeah, that’s kind of what I was driving at.

    Now, I’m really off. Goodnight!

  30. RBrown says:

    .Well, let’s see if this stuff happens first. As I understand it we are at the very early stages. First there will be a study, then a document, then the implementation of the document. It’s certainly not going to be tomorrow, is it?

    The documents have already been written.

    Now what will be interesting is the next Pope.

    No, what is interesting is what happens in the next few years

    If he is a Traditionalist in the same mind of BXVI then things will continue at pace. If, on the other hand, the Cardinals are currently secretly thinking “oops” then the next Pope might not be so keen on reforming things back.
    Comment by Jack Regan

    Why would the Cardinals be thinking “oops”? Cardinal Ratzinger was not a stealth candidate–he is the most well-known man ever elected to the papacy. As I said before, in pre-conclave activity (and in books) he was very open about what he thinks the Church needs. No Cardinal could say that he was unaware of the Ratzinger positions.

    I never thought there would be a Papa Ratzinger, but I wrote on the COL forum that from what I heard when I was in Rome, he was so widely respected by a lot of Cardinals that no one could be elected pope without the Ratzinger stamp of approval.

    The only Cardinals who would be saying “oops” were those Euro libs who didn’t want him elected.

  31. RBrown says:

    .Well, if you don’t like JP2 then of course it will. But if you do, then it will probably reflect badly on BXVI. I guess it’s about perspectives at the end of the day.
    Comment by Jack Regan </b.

    It has nothing to do with liking or not liking JPII. If there is a massive split (which I doubt) over the restoration of Catholic liturgy, then it has to be said that he didn’t prepare the Church for it.

    Perspectives? You might be too subjective.

  32. Brian Day says:

    Fr Z posts a picture of the Holy Father at Castel Gandolfo, and in the first post in the combox, Steven “hijacks” the thread on the rumor of possible changes to Holy Mass. Interesting. [Shows a lack of respect, perhaps. – Fr. Z]

    If I may post ON TOPIC, I hope HH Benedict enjoys a bit of rest before heading off to WYD in Australia – and that he gets to finish the second volume of Jesus of Nazareth.

    Now to comment on Jack Regan’s initial post.
    -Priest facing the congregation (with reverence of course)
    No. The biggest rupture of the N.O. was changing to Versus Populum

    -Modern music (if done reverently, appropriately and with good theology)
    Possibly, although it should only be used as a third or fourth choice.

    -Lay readers (including women. As long as lay readers respect and understand the importance of what they’re doing, and do it well)
    For about 95% of parishes, this will always be a reality. Although there is no reason to have lay readers at Pontifical Masses.

    -Altar girls (ditto)
    Only at all-girl schools.

    -EMHCs (when actually needed, and they must be properly trained and they must be committed Catholics)
    “When actually needed”. Now there is the rub. I would like to see a clarifying document on that. It has been my (rather limited) experience that the number of EMHCs could be cut in half and still keep Communion times manageable.

    -Use of the vernacular throughout
    In direct conflict with Sacrosanctum Concilium – I don’t think so.

    -Reception of communion in the hand, while standing (again, if done very reverently)
    Have you actually watched the “communion procession”? Your parish may be different, but in my area, people who receive in the hand while standing are not very reverent. You can tell it by their posture and their body language. They don’t believe that they are receiving the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ. Receiving on the tongue while kneeling will go a long way to fix that problem.

  33. joy says:

    An interestin thing to remember is that when then-Card. Ratzinger was interviewed by Raymond Arroyo he said that he did not envision the ‘new springtime’ of the Church to be that everyone was Catholic and going forward together. He said (if memory serves) that he envisioned it smaller but more dynamic and focused (my interpretation, not his exact words.) He then referred to the saying of St. Benedict “pruned, it grows again.” In gardening, pruning is used to make the plants stronger, more able to flourish and bear more abundantly.

    Papa has his pruning shears out…

  34. m.a. says:

    Well, Jack, am I going to be the only one who agrees with you all the way? Looks like it.

    I also would like to see the sign of peace moved from it’s present location. I think it interrupts the flow of the Liturgy.

  35. RBrown says:

    After I converted in 1970, I was stunned to find that so many of the distinctively Catholic things (Latin, Greg Chant, the religious habit) had been blithely abandoned as if they didn’t matter. They were out, replaced by social activism.

    Thanks to Providence, within two years after converting, there I was sitting in the nave at Fontgombault, seeing how mass is supposed to be said. And whose abbot (Dom Jean Roy) told us that the bishops in France all hated him.

    A corollary of jettisoning of Catholic identity is equally disturbing. The policy of the Church has been that we all are supposed to worry about offending the enemies of the Church or Her Doctrine.

    Now the finger of God has moved, and we have a pope who understands that the detente between the Church and Secularism has been a failure–and that there is more to the papacy than turning the Vatican into the clearing house for international politics.

  36. Brian Day says:

    Fr Z,
    [Shows a lack of respect, perhaps. – Fr. Z]

    In defense of Steven, I don’t think it was disrespect, but a … um… clumsy way of communicating what he thought was an important topic that you/others should be aware of. Obviously since my post was the first “on topic”, the 30 precious poster thought that the “announcement” was worth commenting on.

    My “interesting” comment was to this phenomenon. I know that you get hundreds of emails a day, so getting a response is difficult at best. It would be nice if there was a way to set up a “tip line” that cut through the comment spam.

  37. David O'Rourke says:

    Steven you have to watch out for rumours.

    In your list you have mandatory use of the Benedictine Altar arrangement and mandatory ad orientem celebrations. Isn’t this a bit contraditory?

    BXVI is not big on subjecting the people to a liturgical blitzkrieg like the one in the late 60’s so don’t expect too much too fast.

    Still, we ARE living in interesting times and while I can’t read tea leaves my instincts tell me that the Lord may not be in any real hurry to call Il Papa home.

  38. Jack Regan says:

    *Well, Jack, am I going to be the only one who agrees with you all the way? Looks like it.*

    I susepct there are others who don’t speak up too…

    But, thank you :)

  39. Jack Regan says:

    *Steven you have to watch out for rumours.*

    Indeed.

    While I like many things about many of the more traditionalist websites that I look at regularly, I have to say that there are a great deal of rumours, predictions and assumptions reported as fact. A very great deal.

  40. Habemus Papam says:

    Some of the comments attributed to Steven were in fact made by Jon. The confused reaction may indicate a hope that the Novus Ordo stays as it is and that Pope Benedicts reign will be transitory.