Cleveland report

I am still in Cleveland, and have been quite busy. 

Yesterday, inter alia, I was at the Orioles-Indians match.  Not exactly a pitching duel, but there were some goo moments.  It was nice to see the ball park.

This morning I am off to the Cleveland Museum, which I hear is very good.

I can’t, for whatever reason, get my laptop to read my memory card from my camera, so photos will have to wait a while.

I am also starting to run up against a couple important deadlines for things I have to write and am getting rather frantic about how to complete them, but hopefully I will have a moment to breathe and think before they are due.

UPDATE:

Today we visited the Cleveland Museum, which had some very good pieces on display, een though their building project is still far form being completed.

After, we had some good Chinese fare for lunch (dim sum).

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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32 Responses to Cleveland report

  1. That’s the Rock and Roll Museum, right?

  2. Kradcliffe says:

    I like the Cleveland Museum of Art – is that where you mean?

    I was a bit shocked by the reliquaries, though – they still contain relics. I don’t think that’s right.

  3. Cleveland’s ballpark is one of the best in the majors! Before you get out of town, try to find a bottle of “Stadium Mustard”. It’s a dijon mustard that they offer at the game, but you can buy it in stores now. It’s an unbelievable match with good Wisconsin bratwurst.

  4. Nicola says:

    Father, are you going to see the Splendors of the Vatican at the Western Reserve Museum?

  5. Dave O says:

    I hope that you are going to see the Vatican exhibit- it is great! We drove up from Columbus a few weeks ago and had a marvelous time.

  6. dcs says:

    Was it difficult to stomach the Designated Hitter heresy when you were at the ball game?

  7. Emilio III says:

    dcs,

    As a Twins fan, Fr.Z should be used to the DHH by now.

  8. The Designated Hitter is awesome. You really want to watch the pitcher bunt everytime he comes to bat? Woo. You’d rather have a pitcher who is throwing well to be pulled from the game just because his spot in the order comes up at a crucial moment? Wow.

  9. RBrown says:

    The Designated Hitter is awesome. You really want to watch the pitcher bunt everytime he comes to bat? Woo. You’d rather have a pitcher who is throwing well to be pulled from the game just because his spot in the order comes up at a crucial moment? Wow.
    Comment by WhollyRoamin’Catholic

    If the pitcher can bunt, he’s probably the only one in the lineup who can.

    One problem I have with the DH is that the pitcher can throw at hitters without concern that he’ll be hit as payback.

  10. Ian H. Power says:

    “I love deadlines. I especially like the whooshing sound they make as they go flying by.” – Douglas Adams

  11. Zach says:

    you should make a side trip down to Holy Family in Columbus, Father :D

  12. We went today to the Cleveland Museum of Art.

    I have seen the Vatican and its splendors, and so did my companions, Fr. Ireland who studied in Rome, and Archbp. Broglio who studied, lived and worked there many years.

    The Museum is still under construction, but some of the collection was visible.

    I did enjoy the Caravaggio, which I hadn’t seen.

  13. Jason says:

    Was it difficult to stomach the Designated Hitter heresy when you were at the ball game?

    I quote to thee the words of Hank Steinbrenner:

    “The National League needs to join the 21st century. They need to grow up and join the 21st century.”

  14. Christabel says:

    Oh dear. My Latin is reasonable, my Greek ok(ish), and my English very fluent (which is useful, as I am in fact English) but I don’t speak ANY American Sport.

    What is meant by “bunt”? “designated hitter”? “pitcher”? What sport is this? Is it the one where you play rugby but with lots of padding and helmets, or the one which is like a girls’ rounders game?

    Should I stick to 5-a-side embroidery?

  15. Patrick T says:

    Christabel,

    All you really need to know about the pastime of baseball is that it features the most difficult task in all of professional sports – hitting a pitched baseball. Nothing else is as hard, and the fact that some men can do this a majority of the time is amazing.

  16. Jason says:

    Christabel,

    Your post reminds me of the Priest in “Brideshead Revisited” who keeps talking to Charles about cricket, when Charles tells him ten times that he doesn’t follow cricket. Charles says that the Priest “looked at me with the expression I have seen since in the religious, of innocent wonder that those who expose themselves to the dangers of the world should avail themselves so little of its varied solace.” Not that you are exposing yourself to the dangers of the world. :P

  17. Joseph says:

    Fr. Z,

    Go to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame!

  18. Chris says:

    Father, you MUST go here: http://www.eastcoastcustard.com/

    It’s the original frozen custard place in the country. It’s incredible.

  19. Michael R. says:

    “Christabel,

    All you really need to know about the pastime of baseball is that it features the most difficult task in all of professional sports – hitting a pitched baseball. Nothing else is as hard, and the fact that some men can do this a majority of the time is amazing.

    Comment by Patrick T — 12 August 2008 @ 5:20 pm”

    A majority of the time? Who has a batting average above .500?

    Glad to hear you’re having a good time in Cleveland, Father. We’re not the cesspool the news media would have you believe.

  20. Alycin says:

    Hey Father,

    I am curious why your phone number is posted and a request for a phone-call. What do you like to talk about? lol

  21. dcs says:

    You really want to watch the pitcher bunt everytime he comes to bat? Woo. You’d rather have a pitcher who is throwing well to be pulled from the game just because his spot in the order comes up at a crucial moment? Wow.

    If we don’t like a tradition, the problem is with us and not with the tradition. ;-)

  22. Sandra says:

    My hometown!!! I do hope you are enjoying the area and the sights. There is so much more to Cleveland.

    If you have the time, there are still more good food places, Sokolowski’s University Inn, (216) 771-9236, Tremont; 1201 University Rd., Cleveland, OH 44113; http://www.sokolowskis.com Is one of the best ethnic (meaning Slavic) places around.

  23. Corboy says:

    Things aren’t as DIM as they SIM

  24. Dan Hunter says:

    Jason,
    The American league did not fabricate the DH until 1974.
    The DH is a relatively new invention, and one which besmearchs the purity of baseball.
    Let the pitcher hit. It makes things a lot more strategically interesting.
    Get with it American League, ya bunch of pantywaists.

  25. Patrick says:

    Michael R,

    Hitting a pitched baseball is not the same as “getting a hit.” Good players put the ball into play (usually hitting it quite hard) a majority of the time. They will go to the plate around 700 times in a season and walk 100 times and maybe strike out 75 times, the rest of the time (aside from the very rare drop-third strike) they hit the ball. Making contact like that is an amazing feat.

    The designated hitter rule has been a very good idea. Let pitchers focus on pitching and stay in the game until it’s time to go. Apparently, teams with designated hitters usually beat teams without them. The national league might want to join real baseball and add them.

  26. RBrown: If the pitcher can bunt, he’s probably the only one in the lineup who can.

    Ha! That’s the Truth.

    RBrown (continued): One problem I have with the DH is that the pitcher can throw at hitters without concern that he’ll be hit as payback.

    If a pitcher throws at enough batters, he’ll get it. In the face. When the batter charges the mound.

  27. dcs: If we don’t like a tradition, the problem is with us and not with the tradition.

    Please. Watching the pitcher strike out is like a second confeitor. Really, what’s the point?

  28. Patrick T: All you really need to know about the pastime of baseball is that it features the most difficult task in all of professional sports – hitting a pitched baseball. Nothing else is as hard, and the fact that some men can do this a majority of the time is amazing.

    While I don’t disagree with this sentiment, I really wonder if it’s the hardest task in sport. The serves of a professional tennis player faster, come at a shorter distance and have a wider target (strike zone?).

    We don’t see much volleying anymore in Men’s tennis– so it’s not as fun to watch. We’re seeing TV ratings fall for men’s tennis as a result. Women’s tennis has a lot more volleying– as a result, the matches are more fun to watch and have much higher ratings. Russian stars notwithstanding.

  29. Patrick says:

    WhollyRoamin,

    Although tennis is difficult, I still think baseball is tougher because the pitcher is closer than a server and the bat is much thinner and considerably thinner than the tennis racquet. I’d imagine hitting a baseball with a tennis racquet would be pretty easy.

  30. RBrown says:

    If a pitcher throws at enough batters, he’ll get it. In the face. When the batter charges the mound.
    Comment by WhollyRoamin\’Catholic

    How many incidents did Clemens have when he was in the AL? Lots. How many in the NL? Few–maybe none.

  31. RBrown says:

    While I don’t disagree with this sentiment, I really wonder if it’s the hardest task in sport. The serves of a professional tennis player faster, come at a shorter distance and have a wider target (strike zone?).

    The serve is faster than the pitch, but the distance is longer (78′ from baseline to baseline, 60’6″ from the pitcher’s rubber to home plate). I play tennis now, baseball years ago.

    And the receiver in tennis can stand farther back.

    We don’t see much volleying anymore in Men’s tennis—so it’s not as fun to watch. We’re seeing TV ratings fall for men’s tennis as a result. Women’s tennis has a lot more volleying—as a result, the matches are more fun to watch and have much higher ratings. Russian stars notwithstanding.
    Comment by WhollyRoamin’Catholic

    The new racquets and strings have changed the game, and players now can hit winners from way behind the baseline. And it’s now common for most young players to use an extreme Western grip on both sides, a grip not suited for volleys.

    Federer, of course, is the exception.

    But I don’t see much volleying in the women’s game. Sharapova is no volleyer. Hingis was and had an fine all around game–very interesting to watch.

  32. RBrown: How many incidents did Clemens have when he was in the AL? Lots. How many in the NL? Few—maybe none.

    Maybe he hit the steroids more in the AL? Maybe there were more people he wanted to hit in the AL? There could be other factors.