What we learn from the internet

What we learn from the internet.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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10 Responses to What we learn from the internet

  1. Volpius says:

    This is very true lol, a lot of people use wikipedia for nearly everything, but anyone can go on there and enter anything they want about a subject even if it is total nonsense and possibly millions of people will read what is wrote and take it is as a fact.

  2. Brian Day says:

    If I see it on my computer screen, it must be TRUE!

    It is the same thing with newspapers, magazines, and television. Hey, if it is in the NCR (Reporter) you know it must be true.

    (Apologies to John Allen of course.)

  3. Charivari Rob says:

    Darn those loose editing standards at Wikipedia! Such an obvious error.

    Everyone knows there’s no such thing as sky gnomes. Gnomes are creatures that walk on the ground. Obviously, the blue sky is painted by pixies and fairies – beings that can fly!

  4. Aric says:

    So, we see on the internet “don’t trust everything on the internet”. Should we believe “don’t trust everything on the internet”? (A Cretan says “All Cretans are liars…”)

  5. Howard says:

    Aric,

    This is not a logic problem, since it wasn’t the internet saying, “Trust NOTHING on the internet.”

    Much junk, some worse than others, is on the internet, but it is also very useful. And, sure, Wikipedia gets deserved grief for its inaccuracies, but it can be really useful, too. Besides, do you believe everything in Encyclopedia Brittanica?

  6. Kelseigh Boor says:

    I think the problem is Trolls rather than gnomes…

  7. Jane says:

    My husband was watching an interview with Sarah Palin. I was on the internet. He called out to me: what is Chilli Mouse? I typed it into the search engine and out came the recipe. Since we are in Oz there is no chance of getting a moose to try out the recipe, however we are not keen to try it anyway. The internet is a good place to find recipes that you do not like.

  8. Jane says:

    I meant to type moose not mouse!

  9. athanasius says:

    Habito in internet, ergo sum.

  10. Aric says:

    Howard,

    Perhaps. It seems to me that the cartoon is either an assertion “Do not trust what you find on the internet” or an assertion “Do not trust what you find on the internet when it does not pass general standards of truth-testing.” While the latter proposition is more nuanced, I am not sure that the cartoon includes those nuances. In any event, I agree my first comment was too hasty.