A growing concern

So… I am looking out of the window of the Sabine Sacristy from the Sabine Chapel and I notice strange things around a tree.

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?

These things are HUGE. 

Anyone know what these are?  They are growing under an ash tree, possibly along where the roots are.

Everyone, I am sure, knows the old phrase "as bold ad borage", or "borage is courage", or even "a garden without borage is like a heart without courage".

It takes a while to grow, but I have a little going now.

Here are what the edible flowers look like.

Borage was known in medieval times to be good for people with melancholy.  I believe that extracts from borage are still used in the treatment of depression.

And these flowers are darn good in Gin!

Finally…

PENJING REPORT

UPDATE 10 Aug 1614 GMT

Okay!  The mushrooms are Gyrodon merulioides

A reader sent this:

The mushrooms on your lawn belong to Gyrodon merulioides, in other sources named Boletinellus merulioides (those are synonymous names, as it often happens in mycology).

They are known under the common name of  "ash bolete" or "ash-tree bolete".

These are edible mushroom, but not very tasty. I tried to eat them more than once, and I was always disappointed. They have somewhat "woody" taste.

UPDATE 1714 GMT

I went out and picked some mushroom near the Gyrodon merulioides.

Meet Marasmius oreades which what the French call "mousserons".

FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in My View, SESSIUNCULA. Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to A growing concern

  1. PeterK says:

    They’re a type of mushroom/fungi. i’ve not seen this type before. best to contact a mycologist

  2. Ellen says:

    Hmm, this is interesting. I’ve never seen a mushroom that looked quite like that. I can’t give you the exact name, but I can tell you that when mushrooms grow in a ring like that it’s called a fairy ring.

    The borage flowers are very pretty. They make great decorations for cakes. Lightly whip an egg white, paint the borage flowers with it, then sprinkle them with sugar. Let them dry on waxed paper and then use them to decorate cakes or cupcakes.

  3. Spera In Deo says:

    Whiskey Tango Foxtrot!

    I frankly cannot believe I am seeing this on this site!

    As an old Navy man it can mean only one thing!!!

    [What’s This Fungus?]

    Please……………………..

  4. Causus Omnium Danorum says:

    Obviously a sign of your exceptional morel rectitude [LOL]

    (ducks)

  5. Kerry says:

    Those are not Marasmius Oreades, commonly known as Fairy Ring mushrooms. Marasmius have very woody stipes, an irregular edge, are pale cream beneath with gills and very tasty! They are very easy to recognize and distinguish from other mushrooms. Note the non-gill structure beneath the photos above, very different from gills on the familiar common meadow mushrooms sold in stores, agaricus campestrus. I do not recognize your mushrooms Father Z, but they might be edible Boletes.

  6. This “Body Snatcher” post is scaring me. Next we’ll see Father standing and pointing at us and screaming.

    LOL! Well, you know you want to anyway, don’t you?

    LOL!

  7. I believe this…

    …. is Marasmius oreades.

    It is growing next to the … still nameless huge strange fungi.

  8. irishgirl says:

    Those fungi are huge! And scary lookin’

    You can EAT the borage flowers? What do they taste like?

    Sorry for my ignorance of flora….I have a hard enough time with the exploding cedar bush in front of my house….

    Penjing is thriving, though….

  9. Tim Ferguson says:

    Hmmm, a large strange, nameless fungus seemingly attacking the roots of the tree, serving no purpose other than to alter the layout of the lawn and spread its, presumptively, noxious presence to a larger and larger area, crowding out the benign mushrooms that seek only to live in peace and harmony with the order of things that had been established and proved to be salubrious for all concerned for many, many years. If a scientific name is not forthcoming, I would suggest that you call it Clitocybe bugniniensa

  10. FinnMinn says:

    Borage leaves are a traditional ingredient in a Pimms cup, although since they are hard to find, a cucumber is often used as a substitute.

  11. Picture #3 makes it seem as if you’ve been eating the fungus. Or were you standing on your head? :)

  12. Okay! The mushrooms are Gyrodon merulioides.

    A reader sent this:

    The mushrooms on your lawn belong to Gyrodon merulioides, in other sources named Boletinellus merulioides (those are synonymous names, as it often happens in mycology). They are known under the common name of “ash bolete” or “ash-tree bolete”. These are edible mushroom, but not very tasty. I tried to eat them more than once, and I was always disappointed. They have somewhat “woody” taste.

  13. Andrew says:

    Dear Fr. Z:

    Please, please, and please leave the mushrooms alone! Too many “experts” have died of mushroom poisoning. Some of the highly poisonous ones look just like the good ones: the only difference: one of them will kill you.

  14. hald says:

    You appear to have dropped a closing tag near the end of this entry, causing all older entries to be 100% bold.

  15. gambletrainman says:

    I’m glad you found out the name of this “mushroom”, but I did want you to know I have the same type growing in my back yard in Virginia, and have had it for several years. It springs up from the roots of my silver maple tree, so there’s no particular pattern. It’s the same color as yours, but I’d be afraid to eat it, although I love mushrooms.

  16. Amy MEV says:

    Borage flowers in gin, huh? My husband will be pleased to hear this. At my house, the plant is referred to as “duck crack”, as when we feed the leaves to the ducks, they act like they are on crack (not that I’ve seen a duck on cocaine, but we’re assuming). Suffice it to say, they enjoy it tremendously.