St. Moses, prophet

MosesMany people do not realize that may Old Testament figures are considered by Holy Mother Church to be saints.

We can find many of them listed in editions of the Roman Martyrology, both pre-Conciliar and post.

1. Commemoratio sancti Moysis, prophetae, quem Deus elegit, ut populum in Aegypto oppressum liberaret et in terram promissionis adduceret; cui etiam in monte Sina sese revelavit dicens: "Ego sum qui sum", atque legem proposuit, quae vitam populi electi regeret.  Ille servus Dei in monte Nebo terrae Moab coram terra promissionis plenus dierum obiit.

 

Anyone want to take a crack at What The Martyrology Really Says?  Enjoy some Mystic Monk Coffee, or refresh your depleted supply, and get out that dictionary if necessary.

Also, a question to readers:

Have any of you ever seen a stained-glass window of Moses at the cleft in the rock in Exodus 33?

In lieu of such an image, here is Moses from the feeder:

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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16 Responses to St. Moses, prophet

  1. lucy says:

    That’s incredibly funny. I almost choked on my Mystic Monk coffee. He really does look like Moses with his “horns”

  2. chonak says:

    The commemoration of holy Moses the prophet, whom God chose that he might free His people oppressed in Egypt and lead them into the promised land; to whom He revealed Himself on Mount Sinai, saying “I am who am”, and presented the law which was to govern the life of the chosen people. This Servant of God died at a ripe old age on Mount Nebo in the land of Moab overlooking the promised land.

  3. A. J. D. S. says:

    The commemoration of holy Moses, prophet, whom God chose so that He might liberate the people oppressed in Egypt and lead them into the promised land; and to whom he revealed Himself on Mount Sinai, saying: “I am who am”, and handed down the law, which might guide the life of the chosen people. On Mount Nebo in the land of Moab in the presence of the promised land, that servant of God died in the fullness of age [at an advanced age].

  4. Fr. Basil says:

    It’s no secret to render the Roman Martyrology notices into English, as you can find it on line at breviary.net (beware–sede vacantist).

    Today is also the commemoration of Moses and Aaron on the Byzantine Calendar, as well as the icon of Our Lady the Unburnt Bush.

    FWIW, you can find the Prologue (sometimes spelled Prolog) from Ochrid several places on line, as edited by St. Nicholas Velimirovic. It’s the Byzantine equivalent of the Martyrology.

  5. papaefidelis says:

    Commemoratio sancti Moysis, prophetae, quem Deus elegit, ut populum in Aegypto oppressum liberaret et in terram promissionis adduceret; cui etiam in monte Sina sese revelavit dicens: “Ego sum qui sum”, atque legem proposuit, quae vitam populi electi regeret. Ille servus Dei in monte Nebo terrae Moab coram terra promissionis plenus dierum obiit.

    Commemoration of Holy Moses, prophet, whom God chose to free His people, oppressed in Egypt, and lead (them) to the “Land of the Promise”; to whom He revealed Himself on Mt. Sinai, saying, “I AM WHO I AM”, and giving the Law, which would guide the life of His Chosen People. That servant of God met the fullness of his days (i.e. died)on Mt. Nebo in the land of Moab, just outside of the “Land of the Promise”.

    I realize, of course, that “The Land of the Promise” is quite preposterous, but I like the sound of it and it is literally correct.

  6. papaefidelis says:

    In contrast to the other translations, I mistook plenus as a neuter object of obiit, the accusative case of the non-existent noun plenus, pleneris, n. fullness. This is obviously incorrect and I sincerely apologize. I believe on further thought, rather, that it is indeed the nominative subject of obiit: “He, full of days (in advanced age), died…” I shall now, as penance, read the collected works of Bugnini. Alas.

  7. shin says:

    Moses said to God: Lo, I shall go to the children of Israel, and say to them: The God of your fathers hath sent me to you. If they should say to me: What is his name? what shall I say to them?

    God said to Moses: I AM WHO AM. He said: Thus shalt thou say to the children of Israel: HE WHO IS, hath sent me to you. And God said again to Moses: Thus shalt thou say to the children of Israel: The Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me to you: This is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations.

  8. chonak says:

    In 1975 ICEL style:
    “Commemoration of Moses, community organizer. He led the liberation struggle …”

  9. Fr. Basil says:

    A question for Fr. Z or any other priest of the Latin Church here.

    What authority does the Roman Martyrology have?

  10. Fr. Basil: The Roman Martyrology is an official liturgical book of the Roman Catholic Church which reflects is continous tradition of prayer, the cult of saints, and, more recently, official acts of beatification and canonization.

  11. Roland de Chanson says:

    Fr. Basil,

    Thank you for the nod to St. Nikolaj Velimirović, a saint of the Serbian Orthodox Church and the author of the sublime Prayers by the Lake. One of my ongoing projects is the translation of these prayers into Latin, though I do rely on the crutch of a Russian translation as my Serbian is claudicant. I recommend to the readers of this blog to search out the English translations and to meditate upon them.

    It is clear that Orthodoxy has produced abundant saints though not embellished by the fanfare, pagentry and panoply characteristic of the Roman Church. Benedict ought to make a pilgrimage to Serbia for the elevation of St. Nikolaj as he is about to do for Cardinal Newman. Both are holy men worthy of devotion each after his own fashion. Both ought to be venerated in the Roman Church as saints.

    Et notandum sit: Campus Merularum Serbia est. (Kosovo je Srbija).

  12. We read the “Roman Martyrology’ each morning between the Office of Readings and Morning Prayer.
    Some monastics do it at other times during the day. It is always for the preceding day, so that we can prepare for the next liturgical feast/memorial.
    It gets a bit “complicated” sometimes because we pray the LOH according the the OF and have Holy Mass according to the EF on most days…eventually, it will work out, one way or another.

  13. chonak: you are a scream!

    Fr. Z: “Anyone want to take a crack at What The Martyrology Really Says?” Is this a trick quetion? It seemed pretty straight-forward. Or am I missing something. Now I’m worried. Cheers! edp.

  14. PaterAugustinus says:

    “The Memorial of the Holy Prophet Moses, whom God chose that he should deliver the oppressed people in Egypt and lead them into the land of the promise; unto whom also He revealed Himself on Mount Sinai, saying: “I Am Who I Am,” and (to whom He) gave the Law, which should rule the life of the chosen people. That man died as God’s servant, ripe in years, on Mt. Nebo in the land of Moab, with the land of promise before his eyes.”

    I had the pleasure of seeing a young Jewish woman baptized a couple years ago, in the Orthodox parish of the Holy Trinity (Santa Fe, NM); her father was a rabbi, and attended all the services from her baptism on Lazarus Saturday, all the way through Holy Week and the Paschal Vigil. He was deeply moved, and said that he saw so much of the synagogue and its heritage still living in the parish, that he had no misgivings about his daughter’s decision. She took Moses’ name in baptism, feminized as Moeshia.

    Prophet of God Moses, pray for us and for the children of Israel, reckoned after the flesh!

  15. irishgirl says:

    I love ‘little Moses’, the birdie!

    Whenever I’ve watched the movie ‘The Ten Commandments’ on TV [when I had TV], at the end when Charlton Heston as Moses ascends Mount Nebo to die, I always say, ‘Bye, Moses-see you at the Transfiguration!’

  16. James Kabala says:

    Does anyone know why these Old Testament saints are not actually commemorated on the Roman calendar (either traditional or post-1970)? Not that I am eager to mess around with the liturgical year even further, but it would nice if at the last the top tier of OT figures (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joshua, Samuel, David, Elijah, Elisha, Isaiah, Jeremiah) had annual feasts. I know they do in the Eastern calendars.