Sts. John Fisher and Thomas More

From the 2005 Martyrologium Romanum.

Sanctorum Ioannis Fisher, episcopi, et Thomae More, martyrum, qui, cum Henrico regi Octavo in controversia de eius matrimonio repudiando et de Romani Pontificis primatu restitissent, in Turrem Londinii in Anglia trusi sunt.  Ioannes Fisher, episcopus Roffensis, vir eruditione et dignitate vitae clarissimus, hac die iussu ipsius regis ante carcerem decollatus est; Thomas More vero paterfamilias vita integerrimus et praeses coetus moderatorum nationis, propter fidelitatem erga Ecclesiam catholicam servatam sexta die iulii cum venerabili antistite martyrio coniunctus est.

Anyone care to take a shot?

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14 Responses to Sts. John Fisher and Thomas More

  1. isnowhere says:

    Dont think google got it right this time… (Might just be me):
    Saints John Fisher, bishop, and Thomas More, the martyrs, who, with his marriage of King Henry the Eighth in dispute repudiated and back of the primacy of the Roman Pontiff, are Trust in the tower of London in England. John Fisher, bishop of Rochester, a man of great renown for learning and the dignity of life, before the prison of the king was beheaded by order of this day; the life of Thomas More, however, upright father of a family group and the president who presided over the nation, for the sake of fidelity to the Catholic Church saved the sixth day of July when he joined the venerable prelate of martyrdom .

  2. albizzi says:

    I was taught latin for 5 years in the early sixties by the College of Provence’s Jesuit fathers, but I could translate this text at once easily.
    My memory still is in good form.

  3. John Nolan says:

    Of Saints John Fisher, bishop, and Thomas More, martyrs, who, when they resisted King Henry the Eighth in the dispute concerning the repudiation of his marriage and the primacy of the Roman Pontiff, were confined in the Tower of London in England. John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, a man greatly renowned for his learning and the worthiness of his life, was beheaded on this day in front of the prison by order of the same king; Thomas More the father of a family and truly most upright in his life, and head of the assembly of the governors of the nation, because of his fidelity towards the Catholic Church which he served, was joined in martyrdom with the venerable bishop on the sixth day of July.

  4. PaterAugustinus says:

    [Commemoration] of St. John Fisher, bishop, and Thomas More, both martyrs, who, when they stood firm against King Henry VIII in the dispute over his marriage and over the primacy of the Roman Pontiff, were thrown into the Tower of London. John Fisher, the bishop of Rochester and a man far-famed for his erudition and worthy manner of life, was on this day beheaded just outside the prison by command of the same king; but Thomas More, a paterfamilias leading a life of great integrity, and the head of the company of the nations’ governors, was joined in martyrdom with the venerable prelate on the sixth day of July, on account of the faithfulness which he had preserved towards the Catholic Church.

    Men of integrity, and a great example. May God give us the strength to resist the slow march of evil and compromise that defines modern life, and especially the modern statist ideologies.

  5. Andrew says:

    I coudn’t do better than the above poster, except for the “et praeses coetus moderatorum nationis” which I understand to be a reference to the office held by St. Thomas More. “Coetus moderatorum nationis” sound like a description of the governing body of the (English) nation.

  6. Theodore says:

    @ Andrew: 22 June 2011 at 3:25 pm

    Sir Thomas More was the Lord Chancellor of England (Scotland had it’s own at the time) and thus the prolocutor of the House of Lords.

  7. I’m not finding Thomas More on the preconciliar calendar. Am I missing him?

  8. jules1 says:

    Although St. Thomas More was martyred on 1 July, two weeks after St. John Fisher, their respective feast days have been joined together and are celebrated on 22 June. Both were beheaded in 1535 by order of King Henry VIII, whom they had resisted in the matter of his divorce

  9. Jeremiah says:

    I was particularly excited when I learned that my birthday is on St. Thomas More’s feastday. A Man for all Seasons watching party to celebrate? I think so.

  10. Nova Eboracensis says:

    Here’s my attempt:

    (The Memorial) of Saints John Fisher, bishop and Thomas More, martyr, who were cast into the Tower of London in England when they resisted King Henry VIII in the matter concerning his rejection of (the lawfulness) of his marriage and of the primacy of the Roman Pontiff. John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, a man noteworthy for his learning and probity of life, was, this day, at the command of the same king, beheaded before (the place of his) imprisonment. Thomas More, rightly (well known for) his life as the head of a family, and the most respected chief magistrate in the kingdom, on account of his continued fidelity to the Catholic Church, joined the venerable bishop in martyrdom the sixth day of July.

  11. John Nolan says:

    In the pre-Conciliar calendar the feast of SS John Fisher and Thomas More (double of the first class, 9 July) was a local feast. Had it fallen on a Sunday it would have displaced the Mass of the season in England and Wales. There were also votive Masses for the respective martyrs. Now the commemoration is universal and falls on the anniversary of Fisher’s execution.

    Of the two, Fisher is undoubtedly the more heroic; he had been a thorn in the king’s side for some years. He alone of the English bishops did not follow the king into schism (it does no harm to remind the current hierarchy of this when they get too big for their boots). More wanted to withdraw into private life with his conscience intact, but a vindictive monarch forced his hand.

    I’m surprised that the Martyrology doesn’t mention that Fisher was made a Cardinal shortly before his death; the judicial murder of a prince of the Church was more shocking to European opinion than that of a politician. Execution was an occupational hazard for Tudor statesmen.

    To be fair to the other bishops, they probably thought that the break with Rome was a temporary political expedient. When it proved not to be so, one of them remarked ruefully: “Would that I had stood with my brother Fisher!”

  12. tmjost says:

    May I say that I thank God for men such as these! We need heroic people to stand up for what is right! What might they say of the state of the affairs in our country and world today? The definition of marriage is blurred, and divorce is rampant. These true men of God stood for what is right despite the cost of their very lives. How many today would do the same for the sacrament of marriage?
    St John Fisher, and St Thomas More pray for us!

  13. David Homoney says:

    Saints John Fisher, bishop, and Thomas More, martyrs, who, with the controversial marriage of King Henry the Eighth, dispute it and back of the primacy of the Roman Pontiff, are thrust in the tower of London in England. John Fisher, bishop of Rochester, a man of great renown for learning and the dignity of life, in front of the prison was beheaded by order of the king on this day; the life of Thomas More, however, upright father of a family who presided over the nation, for the sake of fidelity to the Catholic Church saved the sixth day of July when he joined the venerable prelate of martyrdom .

  14. John Nolan says:

    More gobbledegoogle?