10 May: St. Job

Many of the figures in the Old Testament are commemorated by Holy Church as saints.

Here is the entry in the 2005 Martyrologium Romanum:

1. Commemoratio sancti Iob, admirandae patientiae viri in terra Hus.

 

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7 Responses to 10 May: St. Job

  1. Clinton R. says:

    Father, does the Church consider Job a real person? A couple of months ago, I went to a OF Mass, where a reading from the book of Job was read, and in his homily, the priest said Job was not a real person and the book of Job is a parable.

  2. carl b says:

    The commemoration of holy Job, a man of admirable patience in the land of Uz.

  3. Supertradmum says:

    Job has been seen as a true story but the name Job may be a change from the original. And, why cannot a true story also be a parable…that is a tale with a moral meaning? Such is The Song of Roland for example. from phone

  4. Tina in Ashburn says:

    What proof does a priest have that Job ISNT a real person? We have the Bible account, Job is even cited in the New Testament. What is this priest’s proof?

    It is also the feast of St. Solange, the shepherdess, better known in France.

  5. ContraMundum says:

    What proof does a priest have that Job ISNT a real person? We have the Bible account, Job is even cited in the New Testament. What is this priest’s proof?

    He undoubtedly remembers a snide remark from a professor in seminary, or perhaps just the general attitude that everything in the Old Testament and most of the New Testament is a fairy tale. In other words, the same “proof” as for the feeding of the 5000 being just “the people’s response to an example of generosity”.

  6. JacobWall says:

    These days it’s trendy and makes you look “intellectual” if you off-handedly remark that something from the Bible wasn’t real. I’ve never heard anyone support this kind of claim. Apparently they’re not required to.

    My reason for commenting, though, is to ask if there’s an online copy of the “Martyrologium Romanum.” I’ve been looking for day which commemorates the Patriarch Jacob; our family has begun celebrating our Saint Days, and so far I’m the only one we don’t know when to celebrate. I know there’s a St. James day (recently celebrated, I do believe); james = jacobus, obviously a valid pick, but I know for a fact that my parents choose my name inspired by the OT Patriarch, not the NT Saint.

    I’ve seen Feb 5 and Feb 6, from un-referenced Anglican and Lutheran blogs, I do believe, but I haven’t found any confirmation of when we commemorate this Patriarch officially. I wouldn’t mind having access to an online version of the Martyrologium Romanum for perusal and reference in general, if anyone knows of such a thing.

  7. Tina in Ashburn says:

    Jacob, I found the Martryology in Latin online. http://archive.org/details/martyrologiumrom00cath