13 July: St. Ezra, Old Testament Prophet

Some of you may not know that Holy Church considers many Old Testament figures to be saints.  You can find them commemorated in the pages of the Martyrologium Romanum.  Today, for example, we have…

2. Commemoratio santi Esdrae, sacerdotis et scribae, qui, tempore Artaxerxis regis Persarum, Babylone in Iudaeam rediens populum dispersum congregavit et omni studio enisus est, ut legem Domini investigaret, impleret et doceret in Israel.

You can give us your own perfect but still smooth and elegant version in English.

Not to be outdone, the New Testament also produced a few saints, though that may not come as much of a surprise.

3. Commemoratio sancti Silae, qui, ab Apostolis ad Ecclesias gentium una cum sanctis Paulo et Barnaba destinatus, praedicationis officum, gratia Dei plenus, instanter consummavit.

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3 Responses to 13 July: St. Ezra, Old Testament Prophet

  1. Captain Peabody says:

    Literal:
    The commemoration of St. Esdras (Ezra), priest and scribe, who, in the time of Artaxerxes the King of the Persians, returning brought together the people dispersed in Babylon into Judaea, and strove with every zeal to discern the law of God, fulfill it, and teach it to Israel.
    Smoother:
    The commemoration of St. Ezra, priest and scribe, who in the time of Artaxexes King of Persia gathered his people scattered in Babylon and returned them to Judaea, striving zealously to discern the law of God, fulfill it, and teach it to Israel.
    And:
    The commemoration of Saint Silas, who, dedicated by the Apostles for the Churches of the Gentiles together with Saint Paul and Saint Barnabas, filled with the grace of God, zealously accomplished the office of preaching.

  2. WesleyD says:

    Capt. Peabody: I would suggest the dependent clause might be better rendered as “who, in the time of Artaxerxes the King of the Persians, returning from Babylon to Judea, gathered together the dispersed people.” I agree that rediens is singular nominative, so its subject is Ezra. But while Babylone could be a locative designating “place where”, it is more likely an ablative designating “place from which”, since the verb “to return” more naturally takes a place from and a place to, rather than a place where. And then of course, since Latin and Greek designate a two-part activity with participle-plus-verb whereas English uses verb-plus-verb, it would then be elegantly rendered as “who, in the time of Artaxerxes the King of the Persians, returned from Babylon to Judea and gathered together the dispersed people”.

  3. Tom in NY says:

    2. “The commemoration of St. Ezra, priest and scribe, who, while returning to Judea from Babylon at the time of Artaxerxes, King of the Persians, gathered the dispersed people, and strove with every effort to research, fulfill and teach the law of the LORD.”
    Note here there is no ablative absolute, and that rediens is a present participle and congregavit is a perfect. Would you prefer populo tempore Artaxerxis regis Persarum Babylone in Iudeaeam reddito ecclesiam congregavit? See. Ez. 7
    3. “The memorial of St. Silas, who was appointed by the Apostles to the Churches of the peoples as one with Ss. Paul and Barnabas, was full of the grace of God, and fulfilled the preacher’s duty with vigor.”
    Better in English as:
    “The memorial of St. Silas. He was appointed by the Apostles for the Churches of people outside Israel as one with Ss. Paul and Barnabas. He was full of the grace of God, and completed with vigor his preacher’s appointment.”
    Ut dicitur, lingua latina una sententia, anglica tres loquitur.
    Salutationes omnibus.