Your Good Sunday Sermon Notes

Was there a great point from the Sunday sermon you heard?

What was it?

 

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21 Responses to Your Good Sunday Sermon Notes

  1. solideopileolus says:

    I do apologize as this comment is actually a question regarding the Feast of the Apostles, Ss. Peter and Paul and is as such unrelated to the blog post. Can someone please tell me if the Solemn Blessing over the people for the Feast of the Apostles is still prescribed in the new English translation of the Roman Missal? It wasn’t pronounced in my parish this year nor did the Pope have it at the Pallium Mass. It was however included at the end of the Mass last year when the older translation was in force. Is it no longer prescribed now?

  2. Todd V. says:

    Latin Rite Ordinary Form…

    A Vocations Director presided and preached, concentrating on the First Reading from Wisdom — that God’s will for us is to our benefit, for God wills only good things. Therefore, we shouldn’t fear God’s will, and if we must make sacrifices to follow God’s will, we must trust that He will richly reward us. He then gave his encouragement to young men and women discerning a vocation to the Priesthood and Religious Life, for though it may seem to be “death,” God does not will death, and a religious vocation faithfully followed leads to abundant life.

  3. Philangelus says:

    Jesus’s response to the woman with the hemorrhage was not just to be happy she’d been healed, but to want to touch her and know her. It isn’t enough to God just to be our wonder-worker, but rather, God wants that kind of personal contact with us, and that is most fully expressed in the Eucharist when He becomes a part of us.

  4. Sissy says:

    NO in Bahamas. A new priest has arrived and made some very positive steps (the 1960s era projector screen near the sanctuary is gone!). His homily noted that the woman in the Gospel reading had “tried everything” before turning to Jesus. He urged us to turn to Jesus daily for all things, and not to turn to Him only as a last resort in times of extremity. The Haitian choir was excellent as always.

  5. Supertradmum says:

    Fantastic sermon on how God wants us to ask directly for our needs to be met because He wants a personal relationship with us. Also, that we live in a great age of anxiety and need to learn to trust, a virtue which is not known in the heart by most adults. The priest, Msgr. Keith, is a great homiletic preacher and has great depth, weaving together both Scripture exegesis and personal conversion for us to consider. I think he is a holy man and his homilies are given, like Christ’s teaching, “with authority”.

  6. Finarfin says:

    @solideopileolus:

    The solemn blessing for the feast of Sts Peter and Paul is only optional. I don’t know whether that was the case before the new translation, but that’s how it is now.

    I don’t recall anything particularly striking in the homily, but there wasn’t anything wrong with it either.

  7. yatzer says:

    Our priest gave an outstanding sermon on the need for our freedom under God, how it gradually is being wiped away, and how we should not just leave everything up to the politicians.

  8. great scot says:

    The curate is leaving our parish for a new posting elsewhere in the diocese. However this being his last Sunday in the parish, he gave a great sermon on how God did not give man dominion over life and death; -how generative forces cannot be stopped by man or his government. His primary focus was on the issue of “euthanasia” which has slowly been creeping into our society and he pointed out examples of places that gave a proverbial inch and are now a mile deep in the culture of death. He wove the readings in beautifully with the point that we need to see things as God sees them, drawing a parallel between the group ridiculing Christ for saying the little girl was only sleeping and not dead to the element in our society which ridicules us each time we stand up for life. “They are laughing their way straight to hell -because they just don’t get it.” He said. He also said that we need to stand up and call things what they really are and not lie to ourselves and others by dressing up our words with false philosophies and euphemisms; -we are called to live with dignity, with a strong faith, helping others keep from dispair in spite of our own sufferings.

    That is just the jist of it. There were several great points. I was worried about how the rest of the congregation would react because we do not normally get sermons as strong as this one was. But there was a roar of applause as he made his way back to his seat. He will be missed.

  9. Daria says:

    Fantatic sermon for the Fortnight for Freedom. Father said we would have a little Christmas in July: he recapped the episode of Scrooge with the ghost of Christmas yet to come, remaining oblivious to the truth, that the funeral being discussed was his own, until the moment of seeing his own name on the tombstone. Father compared Scrooge to American Christians, who did not realize that religion was slowly being repressed by various court decisions (school prayer in 1962; roe v. wade in 1973; the HHS mandate and Obama’s recent statement in favor of same sex “marriage”.)
    Each of these was analogous to one of the hints that Scrooge did not take, until it was nearly too late.But Scrooge did act, and so saved his life.
    Father challenged us to pray, and to act, before it was too late, to save our religious liberty.
    I asked him for his sermon notes and published an edited version on my blog at Catholic Exchange. Look for

  10. Daria says:

    Fantastic sermon for the Fortnight for Freedom. Father said we would have a little Christmas in July: he recapped the episode of Scrooge with the ghost of Christmas yet to come, remaining oblivious to the truth, that the funeral being discussed was his own, until the moment of seeing his own name on the tombstone. Father compared Scrooge to American Christians, who did not realize that religion was slowly being repressed by various court decisions (school prayer in 1962; roe v. wade in 1973; the HHS mandate and Obama’s recent statement in favor of same sex “marriage”.)
    Each of these was analogous to one of the hints that Scrooge did not take, until it was nearly too late.But Scrooge did act, and so saved his life.
    Father challenged us to pray, and to act, before it was too late, to save our religious liberty.
    I asked him for his sermon notes and published an edited version on my blog at Catholic Exchange. Look for the blogger list and click on Daria Sockey, then go to “Scrooge and the HHS Mandate”

  11. Bea says:

    Our priest spoke on Choices:
    We choose to be good, we choose to be kind to our neighbor
    OR
    We choose to sin.
    We choose to go to Heaven or Hell
    People will complain that I’m preaching on Fire and Brimstone
    But let us not forget that Hell DOES exist. God does not send us there. We choose to go when we choose sin over good.
    He said something else but I forgot what. I should have posted earlier before my mind goes blank.

  12. Skeinster says:

    At our E.F. parish:
    We had a mini pre-sermon on the HHS mandate: God is in charge. But we cannot expect that we, as a nation, can indulge in the sins of abortion, contraceptive imperialism, the defrauding of overseas workers, etc. without consequences. We should love our country, but not have illusions about it. We must pray, witness and have peace at heart.

    The main sermon was for the feast of the Precious Blood and was primarily about blood covenants. He discussed the universal idea that blood = life, the offering of blood = offering of life and that the sharing of a blood covenant was a tie closer than birth.
    Fr. compared the blood covenants of the O.T. (Abraham and circumcision, Moses and the Passover and the sprinkling of the Ark of the Covenant on the Day of Atonement) with Jesus in the New Covenant. One point I’ve not heard stressed before: Jesus as the scapegoat, as well as the Paschal Lamb of God, ie. He took our sins upon Himself in the Agony, He was led outside the city by Gentiles (Romans), to be killed for the people.
    His final point: let us be serious about keeping our blood covenant with the Lord.

    Sol- we are blessed to have a relic of St. Paul, so we were able to venerate that on the 29th.

  13. EXCHIEF says:

    Our new Bishop (Diocese of Baker, appointed 1 month ago) visited the Cathedral this weekend (the Chancery is 300 miles from the Cathedral so the Bishop is generally in “his” Church only a few times per year.) Excellent homily drawing on the Gospel message and relating it to the Fortnight for Freedom….he was very clear, specific and direct.

    The Bishop, who is not Hispanic, also offered the noon Spanish Mass and is fluent in that language. His Spanish language homily was very similar to the one at the earlier Mass.

  14. JKnott says:

    EF High Mass
    Beautiful sermon on the Precious Blood and the meaning of blood sacrifice going back to the OT and forward to Christ.
    Father said it is rare to hear about the meaning blood in church today.
    Our EF Mass is scheduled between the other two NO Masses. The servers changed the tabernacle veil, and the piece covering part of the back altar to a velvet red for this Mass. They also brought out relics of St Teresa of Avila, St Therese, St Faustina and St Elizabeth Ann Seton and placed them between the candles. No cutting corners for Our Lord in this parish. Deo Gratias!

  15. AnnAsher says:

    We have amazing dignity due to our baptism. To deny our dignity is to deny God. Don’t let the enemy win by convincing us to just give up to sin.

  16. depeccatoradvitam says:

    Knockout religious freedom with 5 refutations to 5 common cop out arguments by our new associate pastor who is the first to wear a biretta in my 20 years at this parish. Kudos on both counts

  17. philothea.distracted says:

    Father preached on patience and acceptance when God’s Will interferes with your plans. He cited the woman with the hemmorage interrupting His going immediately to the deathbed of Jairus’ daughter as Christ’s example in this regard.

  18. smmclaug says:

    Not so much a great point as a great moment:

    Our celebrant has a particularly poor speaking style. He obviously hates public speaking, and when delivering his homily, his sentences are inflected in a weird, stilted, half-monotone. He makes illogical pauses repeatedly throughout every line of his homily. The content, inasmuch as you can figure it out, is just so-so. It is actually hard to endure.

    Now, this man also happens to be one of the most holy, spirit-filled, joyous, wonderful priests it could ever be your privilege to meet, so nobody much cares (at least not that I’ve ever heard). I mean, you can’t be great at everything, right? Well, during the opening to his homily, he actually went off script, and said that we had a choice. He could either keep it short and send us back home quickly, where we would sit in the hellish heat with no A/C because everybody’s power is out. Or he could inflict us “with forty-five minutes of my preaching, whichever you think is less painful.”

    It was a terrific remark, and everybody laughed warmly. It reminded everyone present that the greatest homily he gives us each week is his smile, his humility, his passionate love of the Lord. He is a better man than most any of us, and paradoxically the most humble of men. His life and the way he lives it is a profound sermon.

  19. mrsschiavolin says:

    Bishop spoke on religious freedom. Made it clear that charity is not optional, but as essential as sacraments and preaching.

  20. Bea says:

    to : EXCHIEF
    Thats interesting to hear that.
    Bishop LC (when he was still a priest and pastor) was the priest that married my son and daughter-in-law in 1999.
    They have a great love for him.
    How difficult it must be for him to be 300 miles away from “his” church.
    Do you mind if I copy/paste your comment to them?

    By the way, I still keep you, myself and the two others on this blog (that are wanting a TLM EF Mass in their parishes) in my prayers that we may get it someday soon.

  21. EXCHIEF says:

    Bea
    Certainly you may copy/paste and send and THANK YOU for your prayers that we someday soon have a EF Mass close by (within 100 miles would be acceptable except perhaps in winter!)