Pope Francis on St. Augustine’s Feast: Mass streamed LIVE today

Pope Francis say Mass today, 28 August, at the Church of St. Augustine in Rome.

The Mass will be streamed live via the Internet beginning at 5:55 PM CET, 10:55 AM CDT, 11:55 AM EDT.

To watch on the Vatican web site, go to http://www.vatican.va/video/index.html .

UPDATE:

I am watching this Mass.

It is clearly an international gathering, taking place while the Augustinians are having their chapter in Rome.  But… they are using Italian and Spanish.

If only there were some language we could use that could unite us across borders and national groups.

Also, aren’t those “sanctus” bells, sitting up on the edge of the altar?

UPDATE:

Interesting.  There doesn’t seem to be a papal Master of Ceremonies there.

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11 Responses to Pope Francis on St. Augustine’s Feast: Mass streamed LIVE today

  1. samwise says:

    St. Augustine stands as the pre-eminent master of personal testimony! Here’s a snippet from BXVI general audience on the Saint in 2008:
    “Today, it is still possible to trace St Augustine’s experiences, thanks above all to the Confessions, written to praise God and which are at the origin of one of the most specific literary forms of the West, the autobiography or personal expression of one’s self-knowledge.”
    –Augustine knew that God was closer to him than he was to himself!

    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/audiences/2008/documents/hf_ben-xvi_aud_20080227_en.html

  2. papist says:

    Interesting. There doesn’t seem to be a papal Master of Ceremonies there.

    Yes… They also kept the Benedictine arrangement; which seems to suggests that this is the will of the Holy Father, and not just an imposition made by the Papal Master of ceremonies, no?

    Also, the Holy Father didn’t look like he was in a hurry to throw off his vestments in the end when he went to pray at the tomb of St. Monica. Perhaps he’s coming around. Pebble by pebble lol.

  3. MBeauregard says:

    Where is the pallium?

  4. sthelensrcbarry says:

    I don’t know if Father Z can remember, but was the Mass that Pope Francis celebrated with the Jesuits directed by Monsignor Marini? Seems a little odd not to see him there.

  5. “It is clearly an international gathering, taking place while the Augustinians are having their chapter in Rome. But… they are using Italian and Spanish.

    If only there were some language we could use that could unite us across borders and national groups.”- Fr. Z

    “Of its very nature Latin is most suitable for promoting every form of culture among peoples. It gives rise to no jealousies. It does not favor any one nation, but presents itself with equal impartiality to all and is equally acceptable to all.

    Nor must we overlook the characteristic nobility of Latin for mal structure. Its ‘concise, varied and harmonious style, full of majesty and dignity’ makes for singular clarity and impressiveness of expression.

    For these reasons the Apostolic See has always been at pains to preserve Latin, deeming it worthy of being used in the exercise of her teaching authority ‘as the splendid vesture of her heavenly doctrine and sacred laws.’ She further requires her sacred Ministers to use it, for by so doing they are the better able, wherever they may be, to acquaint themselves with the mind of the Holy See on any matter, and communicate the more easily with Rome and with one another.

    Thus the ‘knowledge and use of this language,’ so intimately bound up with the Church’s life, ‘is important not so much on cultural or literary grounds, as for religious reasons.’ These are the words of Our Predecessor Pius XI, who conducted a scientific inquiry into this whole subject, and indicated three qualities of the Latin language which harmonize to a remarkable degree with the Church’s nature. ‘For the Church, precisely because it embraces all nations and is destined to endure to the end of time … of its very nature requires a language which is universal, immutable, and non-vernacular.’”- Bl. Pope John XXIII

    I often wonder who the heck is concerned anymore with the credibility, continuity, and and image of the Catholic Church in the eyes of both those within her society and those outside of it, besides a select few like Pope Benedict XVI, Cardinal Burke, Cardinal Ranjith, and a couple others. I’m a convert, and I know all too well the critical eye with which serious potential converts look at the Church, and when I see such blatant contradictions like a Supreme Pontiff canonizing a man with whom he disagrees on major, central issues like the retention of Latin in the sacred Liturgy for ‘religious reasons’ and not so much on ‘cultural or literary grounds’, I grow bewildered and frustrated with the way that the Catholic Church operates today and in the last number of decades. The retention of Latin in the Latin Church’s life, especially in the Liturgy, is centrally important to John XXIII’s thought; the elegance and power with which he explains the reasons for its retention in Veterum Sapientia are a must-read for all Roman Catholics. This is prime Magisterium, from the man who opened the Second Vatican Council and who is about to become a canonized Saint. He is perhaps the most important figure of the twentieth century regarding Catholic matters due to the Council and his thought which shaped its sense of purpose and collective identity, and is apparently a man who Pope Francis deeply admires. In light of all this, is there any way, any possibility, that just maybe we as Catholics can get a little bit of consistency out of the Catholic Church, especially with the world looking on? If Latin is important for ‘religious reasons’, how about if we see major emphasis on its inclusion in the Liturgy and in the Latin Church’s broader life? How about if we see Papal emphasis on retention of the august tongue? What about seeing an investigation and a crackdown on seminaries which refuse to adhere to the Papal Magisterium on learning and understanding Latin and the Magisterium of Vatican II, as well?

    Pardon the rant, but I am endlessly amazed at the great variety of colossal inconsistency and discontinuity that one sees with great regularity in the Apostolic See, the Bishops of the Latin Church, and the Priests in their parishes, not to mention the unorthodoxy and heresy that seminaries and colleges regularly get completely away with. The Catholic Church is hemorrhaging members, experiencing a decline in vocations, and mocked throughout the West and the entire world; maybe the first step to reversing these negative trends is for her to achieve reconciliation with her Tradition, taking the Extraordinary Form seriously and coming to terms with the problems in the Ordinary Form with a clear head, unbiased eyes, and a straightforward and honest disposition, and perhaps regaining the Latin tongue in full force and Reforming the Reform by mixing in equal parts of vernacular and Latin in order to make the aforementioned Reform seem a little bit less like a revolution? Just some thoughts from a frustrated convert.

  6. Chrissin says:

    Thank you for that link! I went right to it and watched the whole thing! I was in that church and remember, of course, Caravaggio’s Madonna di Loreto. While waiting for the Mass to begin the camera spent a few moments on it. I had a chance to practice my Italian- listening. I can pick up a few words here and there. I did notice your pointing out the bells- but never heard them…..
    I did enjoy hearing the Kyrie, Gloria, some familiar bits….

  7. Liz says:

    “If only there were some language we could use that could unite us across borders and national groups.” :)

  8. Marcus de Alameda says:

    “If only there were some language we could use that could unite us across borders and national groups.”
    It seems like a slam dunk but that would offend the mantra of diversity and equality for all sentient beings.
    The decree from the tower of babel

  9. rbbadger says:

    “If only there were some language we could use that could unite us across borders and national groups.”

    I have come to really dislike multi-cultural celebrations. It is one thing if an ethnic community is attending Mass using the cultural expressions proper to them. It is quite another to have, what I like to call, “It’s A Small World” liturgy. I have attended Mass in quite a few different countries. I think the “It’s A Small Word” Mass tends to trivialise all cultures while honouring none.

    When I was in the seminary, I had a number of African classmates. I was impressed by how well they knew the Latin chants, especially in comparison to their American classmates.

  10. MarkG says:

    I don’t like to be critical of Pope, but I wish he would wear better quality vestments.
    The deacon had vestments than the Pope wore.
    I don’t care for gothic vestments, as I don’t think they look at dignified as Roman vestments do.
    It’s also a bit odd that they Pope who holds the office of Bishop of Rome wouldn’t wear Roman vestments.
    Pope Benedict’s vestments are better but still could be better quality.

  11. ppb says:

    They did at least sing the Ordinary chants in Latin (Missa de Angelis).