8 Sept: Nativity of Mary

Here is the entry in the Roman Martyrology for today’s feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary:

Festum Nativitatis beatae Mariae Virginis, ex semine Abrahae, de tribu Iuda ortae, ex progenie regis David, e qua Filius Dei natus est, factus homo de Spiritu Sancto, ut homines vetusta servitute peccati liberaret.

Perhaps you readers would like to offer your own perfect and smooth versions in English.

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33 Responses to 8 Sept: Nativity of Mary

  1. John Nolan says:

    The Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, arisen from the tribe of Juda of Abraham’s seed, descendant of King David; and from whom the Son of God was born of the Holy Ghost, that he might free mankind from the ancient bondage of sin.

  2. ClavesCoelorum says:

    I’m horrible at translating, since I never really learnt Latin, but I’ll still give it a try. :)

    The feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, from the seed of Abraham, arisen of the tribe of Juda, offspring of King David, and of whom the Son of God was born, made human by the Holy Ghost to free men from the old servitude of sin.

    Not really smooth, nor perfect, I suppose…

  3. A.D. says:

    From a little high school Latin from many moons ago and with some help from GT:

    The feast of the birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary – from the seed of Abraham, of the tribe of Judah, from the lineage of David the King – of which the Son of God was born and became man by the Holy Spirit, to set mankind free from the old slavery to sin.

    Happy Birthday, Dear Lady!

  4. Jamie says:

    I’m teaching myself Latin, so here goes:

    My literal word for word translation:
    The feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, of the seed of Abraham the tribe of Judah, of the lineage of King David, from which was born the Son of God, He became man by the Holy Spirit, that from our old bondage of sin men should be free.

    My ‘Smooth(er)’ translation:
    The feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, from the seed of Abraham, of the tribe of Judah, led to birth from the lineage of King David, from whom the Son of God was born. He became man by the Holy Spirit, so that men should be free from our old bondage of sin.

    How’zat? A dictionary and spending an hour on a Monday night with the Cambridge Latin Textbook can pay off you know!

  5. torch621 says:

    What feast? At Mass today it was the 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time.

  6. acardnal says:

    torch621, there are often multiple feasts and memorials attached to specific days on the calendar.
    Today was one of those days but since it was also a Sunday, the “Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary” (which is on both the OF and EF liturgical calendars today) was superseded.

  7. acardnal says:

    A few readers may wonder why the Church celebrates the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary on September 8th? Count backwards nine months and you arrive at the answer.

  8. iPadre says:

    It is regrettable that we cannot have a commemoration in the Ordinary Form. Reason #? for the Extraordinary Form.

  9. Precentrix says:

    The Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, of the seed of Abraham; arisen from the tribe of Juda; of the progeny of King David: of whom the Son of God, being made man by the Holy Spirit, was born; that mankind might be liberated from the ancient slavery of sin.

    Alternatively (probably more ICEL-friendly):

    The Feast of the Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary, of the children of Abraham; risen from the tribe of Juda; of the descendants of King David: the Son of God, being made man by the Holy Spirit, was born of her; that mankind might be freed from the old slavery to sin.

  10. MarkG says:

    Our visiting priest today mentioned that it was also the Nativity of the Virgin Mary.
    I probably should have learned this before – maybe I did and forgot – but he said that Nativity is used for the births of Jesus, Virgin Mary, and St. John the Baptists.
    For other saints, Nativity is used for their death not birth.
    The difference is that Jesus, Virgin Mary, and St. John were all born without sin. St. John was conceived in sin but cleaned in the womb. The other saints were born with sin, but died to heaven, so that makes it their Nativity.
    I found this very interesting, although most of the readers on this blog probably already knew that.

  11. Precentrix says:

    Does it count that I actually persuaded the middle-of-the-road Anglicans where I work as organist (I have permission to do this!) to sing “Happy Birthday” to her today? In context, they sing it practically every week during the notices if it’s someone’s birthday…

  12. jfk03 says:

    The Nativity of the Most Holy Theotokos is one of the 12 major feasts in the Byzantine churches. It has not been forgotten. The troparion for the feast:

    Your Nativity, O Theotokos Virgin, has proclaimed joy to all the world, for from you has dawned the Sun of Righteousness, Christ our God, annulling the curse and bestowing the blessing, abolishing death and granting us life eternal.

  13. Precentrix says:

    This nice translation of the antiphon alone found on the Divinum Officium website, btw:

    This day was born the glorious Virgin Mary, * a child of the seed of Abraham, a daughter of the tribe of Judah, a Princess of the lineage of David.

  14. JARay says:

    I almost posted a translation since I had done one in my head before clicking onto the above postings but the translations are there above and I will not try to outdo them. I do notice that “Precentrix” mentions the website “Divinum Officium”. I did read somewhere that around 30% of all priests actually say their Office online. I thank the man who actually set up Divinum Officium online. I believe also that he has gone to his heavenly reward. I turn to it often even though I did purchase the set of Breviaries when it was re-published by Baronius Press. It serves as a guide to me to get to the right places in the right volume. I have not yet fully mastered doing it on my own. I have managed the standard Office of Readings and Morning and Evening Prayer in the Novus Ordo version quite easily but they are shorter and easier to follow.

  15. Long-Skirts says:

    THE
    NAZARETH
    MINES

    When Rome was
    Of the world –
    And Master Moon
    Was free –

    And Mistress Midnight
    Bedizened -
    In show-star
    Finery.

    A tiny sparkle
    Caught,
    Miss Mistress Midnight’s
    Eye -

    And captured Master
    Moon,
    Who paled
    And gasped a sigh -

    But Rome still
    Of the world,
    Had doctors observe
    Ceiling signs -

    And missed the Immaculate
    Diamond -
    Debouching from
    Nazareth mines.

  16. Will D. says:

    If I understand the calendars right, in both the EF and the OF, the Sunday observance trumped the Feast of the Nativity of Mary. In the new calendar it’s a Feast, in the old, it’s class II.

  17. acardnal says:

    That’s correct, Will D. But as iPadre said at least in the EF, the Collect and Post-Communion prayers were said for the Nativity of Mary in addition to those for the 16th Sunday after Pentecost. This practice is not done in the OF, but it is in the EF whenever there are multiple feasts on the same day.

  18. msc says:

    Celebration of the Birth of the blessed Virgin Mary, sprung from the seed of Abraham, out of the tribe of Juda, from the line King David, of whom the Son of God was born, made man by the action of the Holy Spirit, so that he would free men from the ages-old slavery of sin.

  19. Vecchio di Londra says:

    As St Bernard of Clairvaux said: “De Maria, numquam satis!” A useful contre-parole to those modernists who try to reduce her role in the life of the Church. Not just ‘Never can there be enough said’ but also ‘Never can there be enough praise.’

    And as good a day as any to read this unexpected but obviously sincerely ecstatic sonnet of praise by (non-Catholic) William Wordsworth, the great English poet of nature:-

    The Virgin

    Mother! whose virgin bosom was uncrossed
    With the least shade of thought to sin allied;
    Woman! above all women glorified,
    Our tainted nature’s solitary boast;
    Purer than foam on central ocean tossed;
    Brighter than eastern skies at daybreak strewn
    With fancied roses, than the unblemished moon
    Before her wane begins on heaven’s blue coast;
    Thy Image falls to earth. Yet some, I ween,
    Not unforgiven the suppliant knee might bend,
    As to a visible Power, in which did blend
    All that was mixed and reconciled in Thee
    Of mother’s love with maiden purity,
    Of high with low, celestial with terrene!

  20. Andrew says:

    Shouldn’t it say: ut homines a vetusta servitute peccati liberaret?

  21. Rich0116 says:

    a/ab with liberare is possible, but using it with the simple ablative is more common.

  22. Priam1184 says:

    The feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, from the seed of Abraham, born of the tribe of Judah, of the line of King David, from whom the Son of God was born, made man by the Holy Spirit that he deliver men from their ancient slavery to sin.

  23. Gaz says:

    iPadre regrets the lack of commemoration in the Ordinary Form for this feast. I reckon that commemorations ought to be returned to the Sacred Liturgy of Holy Mother Church and that they should replace her current approach to translation of days of holy obligation to nearby Sundays.

  24. Ian Coleman says:

    Very little to add to the excellent translations already submitted, but, for what it’s worth, here’s mine:

    The feast-day of the birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary, who was of the seed of Abraham, and arose out of the tribe of Judah, from the offspring of King David. Of her was born the Son of God – He who became man through the Holy Spirit in order to free humanity from the slavery of sin.

    The feast was mentioned in his homily by our parish priest at the (OF) Mass yesterday – so I guess this is also one for Fr. Z’s call for ‘positive things we have gleaned from our Sunday homilies’. Many thanks for giving us the chance to stretch our translation muscles, Father!

  25. John Nolan says:

    Yesterday was the anniversary of the founding of the Oxford Oratory in 1990 and the presentation of the Apostolic Brief by Cardinal Stickler in 1993. The 11 o’clock Solemn Latin (OF) Mass was that of Our Lady, and very good it was too, with Haydn’s Missa Sancti Nicolai and two motets by Bruckner. The Gospel was the genealogy of Jesus in Matthew 1, and in his sermon Father announced that he would focus his attention on the women in the list. Delivered in the customary dead-pan English Oratorian style, it was intentionally amusing, although the underlying message was a serious one.

    The other Masses, including the 1962 Low Mass, were those of the Sunday.

  26. In regard to commemorations in the OF, in the new CTS hand missal it says

    “The priest concludes the Prayer [of the Faithful] with a collect.”

    What better collect to use on a feast like yesterdays than its proper collect (thereby serving as a commemoration of the feast)?

    How frequently have you heard an OF celebrant conclude the prayer of the faithful with an actual collect? I sometimes wonder how much seminary time is devoted to liturgical instruction.

  27. Andrew says:

    Interesting: lots of examples prove that the “a” is not needed with “liberare” even when it means “free from”: erroribus liberare. Invidia liberare. Metu liberare. Culpa liberare, etc.

    And yet, we could have: “oratione liberare” which doesn’t mean “to be liberated from prayer” but “to be liberated through prayer”.

    Goes to show that grammar does not always explain human speech.

  28. future_sister says:

    Slightly off topic, but I made it to the TLM for the first time in months. I got there expecting a Low Mass because Father was having issues with the choir… Turns out he managed to drag his niece-in law(?) In to chant so that he could celebrate the High Mass and there was the pilgrim image of Our Lady of Guadalupe in the front of the church for veneration after Mass which was just so amazing. Then I got back to campus and had to sing at the irreverent liberal Novus Ordo on campus and almost cried… Especially since it was irreverent even with the bishop celebrating… I found myself half dreaming of the beautiful reverent liturgy of the TLM the whole time…. This convert will never understand why people can’t see the beauty of the TLM. Also to come slightly back on topic I love how much this blog helps me with the fact that I’m teaching myself Latin.

  29. John Nolan says:

    ” … et a peccato simus semper liberi, et ab omni perturbatione securi”. In the first week of learning Latin I was told that the ablative meant “by, with, or from” according to the context; but it would seem that later Latin added prepositions to avoid ambiguity. I’m no Latinist, but I can’t imagine that a classical Latin speaker would have said “Credo in unum Deum”, not least because in+acc. has the sense of ‘into’, as indeed it does in German.

  30. Sword40 says:

    We celebrated the 16th Sunday After Pentecost. Our Rosary was dedicated to the Nativity of BVM.

  31. Andrew says:

    John Nolan:

    Cicero speaks of “habere pietatem in deos”. (To have a piety in gods: in + acc). Same construction as “credere in Deum”. The difference is not in the language but in the newness of the faith in one God. [Cic. de legibus II: “augere pietatem in deos”].

  32. norancor says:

    The Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary; from Abraham’s seed, from Judah’s tribe arisen, from King David’s descent, from whom was born the Son of God; Who became man of the Holy Ghost, that He should liberate mankind from the ancient bondage of sin.