Most Holy Name

In the Roman Martyrology for today, we find this entry:

Sanctissimi Nominis Iesu, in quo solo omne flectatur genu, caelistium, terrestrium et infernorum, ad gloriam divinae maiestatis.

Some of you Latinists should have a crack at this.

 

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13 Responses to Most Holy Name

  1. scaron says:

    Philippians 2:10, no?

  2. KevinSymonds says:

    “Of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, in which all under the sun, in heaven, on earth and in hell must bend the knee, to the glory of the Divine Majesty.”

    I think that is it….

  3. Unwilling says:

    The Most Holy Name of Jesus, in which [name] alone ought every knee of the heavenly, earthly, and infernal [hosts] to bend before the Glory of the Divine Majesty.

  4. twele923 says:

    The feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, to which alone every knee should bend, of those in heaven, on earth, and under the earth, to the glory of the Divine Majesty.

  5. Iacobus M says:

    Ludus puerilis . . . Num aliquid difficilius habes?

    Vitafamliariscatholica@blogspot.com

  6. majuscule says:

    I don’t want to open a rabbit hole, but…since the subject is Latin…

    Are some papal Masses required to use Latin?

    I noticed that the Holy Mass for the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God at St. Peter’s was not celebrated in the vernacular. I am not fluent in either Italian or Latin so it took me a while to realize that Latin was being used. It became most apparent to me when Cardinal Turkson, who does not have an Italian or Spanish accent, recited his part.

    In a hypothetical case, could a pope who had a disdain for tradition and the use of that dead language, Latin, have opted for a Mass in the vernacular?

    Just wondering…

  7. iowapapist says:

    Holy name of Jesus to you alone, and the glory of your divine majesty, do all in heaven, on earth and in hell genuflect.

  8. Geoffrey says:

    “Are some papal Masses required to use Latin?”

    As far as I can tell, it seems customary to celebrate Mass in Latin (with readings and the general intercessions in the vernacular) in St Peter’s Basilica / Square. Italian with some of the ordinary in Latin seems to predominate outside of St Peter’s…

    I am very glad the Most Holy Name of Jesus made it back into the calendar, even if only an optional memorial.

  9. Andrew says:

    Some of you Latinists should have a crack at this.

    A Jézus szent neve amelyre minden térd meghajoljon, mennyeieké, földieké és föld alatt valóké az Isten dicsõségére.

  10. Nan says:

    @majascule, isn’t Latin the vernacular for the Holy See?

  11. MattH says:

    Sanctissimi Nominis Iesu, in quo solo omne flectatur genu, caelistium, terrestrium et infernorum, ad gloriam divinae maiestatis.
    The Most Holy Name Jesus, in which only all kneel, in heaven, on earth, and in hell, to the glory of the Divine Majesty.

  12. Venerator Sti Lot says:

    scaron and KevinSymonds: largely indebted to Philippians 2:10-11 – “Ut in nomine Jesu omne genu flectatur caelestium, terrestrium et infernorum, Et omnis lingua confiteatur, quia Dominus Jesus Christus in gloria est Dei Patris” – with, I would say, a substantial rather than verbal echo in “solo” of Acts 4:12: “Et non est in alio aliquo salus. Nec enim aliud nomen est sub caelo datum hominibus, in quo oporteat nos salvos fieri.”

  13. Ioannes Andreades says:

    Of the most inviolable Name of Jesus, at which alone every knee is to bend, of those in the heavens, on earth, and under the earth, for the Glory of God’s grandeur.