WDTPRS: Pentecost Monday – bondage to freedom, anxiety to peace

Today is Pentecost Monday during the Octave of Pentecost.  It is also called Whit Monday, a reference to the white garments of the newly baptized.

We observe the Octave in the Traditional Roman calendar.  It was tragically, ridiculously, eliminated in the post-Conciliar calendar.

The Roman Station is S. Peter in Chains.

Listen to a PODCAzT for the days of the Octave of Pentecost which I made a few years ago.

Octaves are mysterious times during which the liturgical clock stops.

We have an opportunity to rest in the mystery, reflect on it during the 8th day – an echo of God’s rest continuing after the Creation and foreshadowing of the eschatological rest we will have in the Beatific Vision.

For Mass we sing the Pentecost Sequence, and use the Preface of the Holy Spirit, as well as a proper Communicantes and also Hanc igitur, as for Easter since Pentecost was also a time of baptism.

Let’s have a look at the Collect for today’s Mass of Pentecost Monday.

COLLECT (1962MR):

Deus, qui Apostolis tuis Sanctum dedisti Spiritum: concede plebi tuae piae petitionis effectum; ut, quibus dedisti fidem, largiaris et pacem.

I found this prayer in the 8th c. Liber sacramentorum Gellonensis.

I like that elegant splitting of Spiritum Sanctum with dedisti.

Our trusty Lewis & Short reminds us that effectus, us, (efficio) means basically “a doing, effecting; execution, accomplishment, performance; with reference to the result of an action, an operation, effect, tendency, purpose”.  Blaise & Dumas offers that effectus has to do with the “realization of a prayer”.

LITERAL VERSION:

O God, who gave the Holy Spirit to Your Apostles, grant to Your people the realization of their dutiful petition, that you may bestow also peace upon those whom you have given faith.

What immediately jumps into my mind are the references to peace in the ordinary of the Mass and also in the modern form for sacramental absolution.

Allow me to stretch to a connection, in view of the Roman Station.

Christ is our Lord and Liberator.  After His Ascension he sent our Counselor and Comforter.

Together, under the eternal aegis of the Father, the Son and the Spirit bring us from bondage to freedom, anxiety to peace.  We need not fear our judgment.

This is accomplished through the ministry and mediation of the Church.

As a People who are members of Christ’s Body the Church we approach God’s mercy with a sense of filial duty, petitioning both the immediate effect of Christ’s merits and also the long-term effect of heavenly peace.

In the words of the Church’s worship, Christ Himself strikes from our limbs the heavy chains of our oppression.

True oppression is from sin.  True freedom comes from grace.

As we hear today in the Gospel from John 14:

If anyone love Me, he will keep My word, and My Father will love him, and We will come to him and make Our abode with him. He who does not love Me, does not keep My words.

FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in Linking Back, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, WDTPRS and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to WDTPRS: Pentecost Monday – bondage to freedom, anxiety to peace

  1. Brent S says:

    Father, don’t forget that the Anglican Ordinariate also observes (kind-of) the Octave as part of their post-conciliar Use of the Roman Rite!

  2. Priam1184 says:

    So does that mean that in the Traditional Calendar Trinity Sunday is the last day of Eastertide? Seems fitting, but having it as the first Sunday of the resumption of Ordered Time works in its own way as well. Pentecost would seem an important enough Feast to warrant an Octave yet I can also see a rationale for making it a one day Feast because there was such a stark change for the entire world because of the events of that day. The day before Pentecost there was no Catholic Church, but on the day after and on every day of the one thousand nine hundred and eighty one years since then there has been the Catholic Church working in the world under the guidance of the Holy Spirit to further the salvation of mankind. Pretty breathtaking stuff if you stop to think about it.

  3. Imrahil says:

    a rationale for making it a one day Feast because there was such a stark change for the entire world because of the events of that day.

    That was not the rationale nor could it be one. A feast with an octave is a feast that is important enough to be celebrated for eight days in a row, while each of the octave days is the feast. The priest says “celebrate the glorious day” in the Masses of the Easter Octave, not Sunday only; the switch to “celebrate the glorius time” is only after the octave.

    And Pentecost surely is as important as that.

    The rationale for the liturgy reformers was that Pentecost is itself the “octave” of the “mega-octave” of Easter (the Holy Fifty Days), and an “octave” does not get its own octave.

    Actually, that was about all the rationale.

    (I don’t think it holds ground because, while Pentecost is among other things that, still there happened enough on Pentecost itself to merit its own octave.)


    The “tides” do not seem to me to be so important in the Traditional calendar – the important thing there seems to be rather what is to be done on the day itself. That said, we have Paschaltide until Vigil of Ascension, then what was originally the Octave of Ascension, then a Friday (I guess we might call this Ascensiontide?), and then Pentecost with Vigil and Octave (Pentecosttide?). On the Octave of Pentecost, the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity is celebrated, while the First Sunday after Pentecost, obviously belonging to anything resembling our “Ordinary Time”, is also on the books (but always superseded by Trinity, of course).

    It does not seem to be as fixed, rather a smooth transition (as, btw., the last Sundays after Pentecost smoothly devolve into Advent, in a way). But an old book of mine says that the Regina coeli is to be said up to and including the Ember Saturday of Pentecost, so that’d be approximately what we call Eastertide.

  4. Blaise says:

    Presumably in the OF calendar a priest is free to celebrate a votive Mass of the Holy Spirit if there is no obligatory feast? I seem to recall Fr Z writing to this effect in a previous year. Not quite the same but still something. Presumably in the EF St Barnabas loses out to the octave if his feast has not been moved to the 11th in the OF

  5. TWF says:

    Wasn’t there something like 18 Octaves on the calendar prior to Pius XII’s reforms in the 50s? Reduced to 3…now reduced to 2.

  6. Burmy87 says:

    I believe in “one rite, one calendar,” but I also believe that the Octave of Pentecost should be restored (after all, it is the second-biggest solemnity of the Church year)…so I can sympathize with both sides here.

  7. Venerator Sti Lot says:

    In the sermon I heard yesterday, the “insufflavit” of St. John 20:22 was connected with the preparation of the water of Baptism. Might that be implicit in this collect, with the “plebs” receiving Baptism and ‘Confirmatio’, including those of them who are subsequently consecrated successors to the Apostles?

  8. VLL says:

    I had a dream about red vestments. There was much red and gold framed with white, and the dream was such I thought I’d gone to mass already when I woke up. Then, this evening, I read this. I know dreams aren’t prophetic, and I am no prophet. Who could let the deletion of (the octave of) Pentecost stand? Why?

  9. Martin_B says:

    Here in Germany Pentecost-Monday is still a public holiday.
    There is also the option in the ordo of the ordinary form to use the formular for pentecost sunday or of the votiv mass of the holy spirit for any mass on this day.
    This option was used at the church I went to yesterday. So: red vestments.

  10. Burmy87 says:

    As I pointed out before, my “one rite, one calendar” plan would restore the Octave of Pentecost…it would also move certain feasts back to their proper days (Ascension & Corpus Christi both on Thursday again). However, certain parts of the current calendar would remain (e.g., Christ the King would still be on the last Sunday in Ordinary Time)…