D. Pittsburgh: Extraordinary Form Parish

I firmly believe that when the older form of Holy Mass is celebrated in more places, we will have a sounder basis for the “New Evangelization” called for by our Popes. Thus, celebrations of the Extraordinary Form must not be concentration (segregated, isolated, contained) in one place in a city or diocese.

Also, for all the good work traditional groups such as the FSSP do, the real renewal will begin when diocesan priests learn the Extraordinary Form. There are a lot of challenges to overcome on that score, but that’s what we need.

That said, there is good news in Pittsburgh. Bp. David Zubick establish a personal parish for the Extraordinary Form in Pittsburgh. HERE

Brick by brick.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

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24 Responses to D. Pittsburgh: Extraordinary Form Parish

  1. Sid Cundiff in NC says:

    celebrations of the Extraordinary Form must not be concentration (segregated, isolated, contained) in one place in a city or diocese. Amen, and yet. alas, segregated, isolated, and contained they are; and some of the blame must be ascribed to those few Trads who seem to go out of their way not to win friends for the Mass in the Extraordinary Form (MEF), who are incessantly whining, frequently unpeaceable, and wilfully ignorant. Most folks want to be isolated from such.

    Also, for all the good work traditional groups such as the FSSP do, the real renewal will begin when diocesan priests learn the Extraordinary Form. Amen. This is the hope for the MEF, and I’m happy to report that his hope is being realized in the dioceses of my state.

  2. Mike says:

    . . . incessantly whining, frequently unpeaceable, and wilfully ignorant. Well said, and describes the Zeitgeist-obsessed self-appointed interpreters of the “Spirit of Vatican II” to a T.

    Most folks want to be isolated from such. Can’t speak for “most folks”, but that’s why this folk attends the Traditional Latin Mass.

  3. Sid Cundiff in NC says:

    Mike is correct to point out that Ultra-Liberals and Ultra Traditionalists are often, sadly, of the same character.

  4. JohnMa says:

    Now if only we could get rid of that ugly picnic table in the sanctuary.

  5. Sid Cundiff in NC says:

    Mike is also correct that many folks refuse to attend either the Ordinary Form or the Extraordinary Form for the same reason: to avoid a certain kind of person.

  6. RJHighland says:

    Was not there just some major conflict between the bishop of Pittsburgh and the SSPX about the purchase of a Church, I think the SSPX finally got a Church now the Bishop brings in the FSSP, very interesting.

  7. RJHighland says:

    The SSPX purchased St. James a church in the Pittsburgh dioceses had put on the auction block. As the modernists decrease the traditionalists shall increase. A brick by brick moment. I think this Synod may mark a change in direction, if traditionalists would have stood up during Vatican II like they did in the Synod we would not be were we are today.

  8. RJHighland says:

    The SSPX purchased St. James a church in the Pittsburgh dioceses had put on the auction block. As the modernists decrease the traditionalists shall increase. A brick by brick moment. I think this Synod may mark a change in direction, if traditionalists would have stood up during Vatican II like they did in the Synod we would not be were we are today.

  9. dinsdale says:

    RJHighland, the SSPX has long had a presence in the territory of the Diocese of Pittsburgh; the recent development is that they were able to secure the purchase of St. James Church (which had been closed by the diocese several years ago) from a third party. The new personal parish will continue use of diocesan clergy and does not involve bringing in the FSSP. The personal parish will also continue to share St. Boniface Church with Holy Wisdom Parish (sorry, JohnMa, looks like the table altar stays).

  10. dochm13 says:

    The famous Fr. DiNardo who supported church sales to protestant groups but blocked the sale of St. Michael’s to the SSPX. SSPX then buys St. James (from a private seller) and magically the FSSP are welcomed into the diocese.

  11. dinsdale says:

    dochm13, am I missing something? The FSSP is not mentioned in Bp. Zubik’s letter and is not mentioned on the Holy Wisdom Latin Mass website.

  12. Andrew_81 says:

    As an SSPX supporter, I am glad to see more bishops responding to the needs of their faithful by arranging for the Traditional Mass to be regularly provided. The primary purpose of the SSPX is the sanctification of priests and the best way is for priests to celebrate the liturgy which clearly communicates to them the sacrificial nature of the priesthood. The more Expensive Masses the better!

    I can’t help but note, however, the coincidence of the recent purchase by the SSPX of a church in the diocese, after years of the diocese adding encumbrances to titles when selling churches prohibiting Catholic worship therin in perpetuity.

    I would really hope that bishops would show a desire to meet the needs of their flock and especially their priest-sons independent of the SSPX needing to make headlines before they act as concerned pastors.

    Perhaps his excellency was planning this for a while. If so the timing is awful, to say the least, and suspicious given the history and context.

  13. Andrew_81 says:

    For “expensive Masses” read EO form Masses… smart spell-check isn’t.

  14. dochm13 says:

    I erred in my assumption of the FSSP being invited in. It appears it is the current diocesan pastor who will lead the “quasi” parish, under the co-ministry of Fr. DiNardo or some confusing arrangement.

  15. anachy says:

    Forgive me if I’m underwhelmed by this news. The TLM community in Pittsburgh has a long and valiant history in the Diocese, having struggled since VII to retain the ancient Mass. I have nothing but respect for their efforts – and the fruit born by their struggles. They have been located at St. Boniface Church for years now, with Sunday High and Low Masses, Holy Day Masses, etc. Still, what you say in your opening to this entry, Fr. Z., is what I am afraid has happened in Pittsburgh: celebrations of the Extraordinary Form HAVE been segregated/isolated/contained to this one parish. The Diocese of Pittsburgh covers over 4,ooo square miles and there are over 670,ooo Catholics within that geographic area – yet there is only one parish that offers the TLM. I live in the Diocese, and could drive to a TLM in another state in about the same time it takes me to drive to St. Boniface on the North Side of Pittsburgh. Consequently, I can rarely attend a TLM. For the most part, (and having been to many, many different parishes in the diocese in the 27 years I’ve lived here) I consider it to be a liturgical wasteland. A lot of very devout Catholics, but a liturgical wasteland. And don’t even get me started on how the Diocese refused to sell a closed church to the SSPX (then warned people that they were to have nothing to do with the SSPX community). The Diocese has, in many cases, sold closed churches to people that turned them into Protestant churches, or in one case a restaurant/brewery (complete with beer stills in the sanctuary. For the blasphemous pictures of this, check, out the Church Brew Works in Pittsburgh).

  16. StnyPtGuy says:

    Is the Father Lawrence DiNardo mentioned in the Bishop’s letter any relation to Cardinal DiNardo, Archbishop of Galveston-Houston?

  17. JonPatrick says:

    Cardinal DiNardo’s first name is Daniel so he is not the same person. They may be related though as Cdl. DiNardo did grow up in the Pittsburgh area.

  18. robtbrown says:

    StnyPtGuy says:

    Is the Father Lawrence DiNardo mentioned in the Bishop’s letter any relation to Cardinal DiNardo, Archbishop of Galveston-Houston?

    My experience is that when Europeans are asked whether they are related to someone with the same last name, they often reply: I think he’s a cousin.

  19. acardnal says:

    robtbrown, did you see my comment under “Pope Francis, Pope” post? It looks like Bp Tobin of R.I. supports your “chaos theory” .

  20. JohnMa says:

    anachy,

    I agree that we have pretty much been segregated to St. Boniface. However, it is worth noting that on a semi-regular basis other parishes do offer Mass in the Extraordinary Form. For example, St. Titus comes to mind. The problem is that the priests that celebrate the EF are not pastors (yet). They are mainly vicars and are prohibited from offering regular EF Masses by the pastor.

    All this being said, I don’t understand why our Auxiliary Bishop has yet to offer Mass in the EF. He did so regularly while a priest, but since his episcopal ordination he has yet to (publicly) offer Mass in the EF. He has done our confirmations in recent years, but they have not been done in conjunction with a pontifical mass.

  21. anachy says:

    JohnMa,
    I didn’t know that the Auxiliary Bishop had offered the TLM ever. I agree that it’s puzzling that he no longer does so. I also agree with you that pastors can squelch the younger priests’ ability to offer the ancient Mass, but I know of at least one priest who learned the Mass, offered it himself (not in public), but since becoming pastor of his own church apparently doesn’t offer it regularly (if at all) there. Go figure. No doubt the cost/benefit calculations aren’t seen as favorable in our diocese. I am glad to hear that some other parishes do offer it. Of course, without those Masses being regularly scheduled, it’s impossible for someone not a member of the particular parishes to know when they would be offered. I have searched high and low on the Diocesan website for any mention of the TLM and have found exactly nothing. I suppose the only way to know would be to search the weekly bulletins of every church in the Diocese to see if any are listed in the upcoming week.

  22. Mike says:

    I have searched high and low on the Diocesan website for any mention of the TLM and have found exactly nothing. I suppose the only way to know would be to search the weekly bulletins of every church in the Diocese to see if any are listed in the upcoming week.

    In many locales, finding a regular or even occasional celebration of the Extraordinary Form can be a challenge. However, once you become part of a Traditional Latin Mass community — perhaps in a neighboring diocese if needed and feasible — it’s possible to be kept up both on public Masses that are offered regularly and on private offerings that are not part of a parish schedule.

    Do scour those bulletins and collect the web links and email addresses you find. Get to know regular attendees. Once you become a regular attendee yourself, be willing to reach out and welcome drop-ins and occasional attendees. Consider starting a web site, as I did, or helping to maintain one.

    As with the pursuit of holiness in general, gaining traction on the TLM can take some work but the work is worth it.

  23. dinsdale says:

    Regarding the auxiliary not offering the TLM since he’s been in Pittsburgh, I have to wonder – did anyone ever ask him to?