31 July – St. Ignatius of Loyola: Jesuits and heretics… and tautology

ignatius_loyola_relicsMay I say from the onset that I have some spiffy Pope Clement XIV gear? HERE

Here is the Martyrologium Romanum entry for great saint, the founder of the Society of Jesus. (To the right is my first class relic of St. Ignatius).

Memoria sancti Ignatii de Loyola, presbyteri, qui, hispanus in Cantabria natus, in aula regia et militia vitam egit, donec, post grave vulnus acceptum ad Deum conversus, Lutetiae Parisiorum studia theologica complevit et primos socios sibi ascivit, quos postea in Societatem Iesu Romae constituit, ubi ipse fructuosum exercuit ministerium et in operis conscribendis et in discipulis instituendis, ad maiorem Dei gloriam.

This morning Holy Mass was celebrated in the presence of a 1st class relic of the saint.

Here is the spiffy Collect from 1962 edition of the Missale Romanum:

COLLECT (1962MR)

Deus, qui ad maiorem tui nominis gloriam propagandam, novo per beatum Ignatium subsidio militantem Ecclesiam roborasti: concede; ut, eius auxilio et imitatione certantes in terris, coronari cum ipso mereamur in caelis.

LITERAL VERSION

O God, who strengthened the Church militant with a new reinforcement through blessed Ignatius, in order to spread widely the greater glory of Your Name, grant that we, who are contending on earth by his help and example, may deserve to be crowned with him in heaven.

The Novus Ordo Collect for Ignatius was weenied-down, I think:

COLLECT (2002MR)

Deus, qui ad maiorem tui nominis gloriam propagandam
beatum Ignatium in Ecclesia tua suscitasti,
concede, ut, eius auxilio et imitatione certantes in terris,
coronari cum ipso meramur in caelis.

Notice anything missing?

Let’s have your perfect renderings of the prayers.

Here is a shot of the altar and tomb of the saint in the Church called the Gesù in the heart of Rome.

Now that’s an altar.  Church architecture reflects the Church’s understanding of her own identity.  Each era has a different expression.  Compare and contrast.

To the right of the altar … by the way the dopey Jesuits removed the Communion rail while leaving the decorative metalwork, thus destroying the integrity of the design…. to the right of the altar is a marble group depiction of Truth beating the stuffing out of Heresy.

Heresy, in this case, means the works of Calvin and Luther.  The little angel is tearing up a bad book.   The ugly heretical bad guys shrink from the Cross and the light that Truth holds.

Under the lower heretic, there is a book with a visible spine that says MARTIN LUTHER.  If memory serves there used to be – some time back – bronze letters which were quite legible, but the Jesuits, who now probably idolize Luther, took them out.  For shame.  You have to know they are there to make out the letters now.  Calvin and Zwingli are on other books.

And then there’s this.  No, this is not a rendering of a Jesuit.

Were these statues to have experienced a true aggiornamento, they’d be tearing up a book by James Martin, though I admit there are many other candidates.

UPDATE:

I’ve been looking around on my hard drive for old pics, before the cleaned up the lettering on the spines of the heretical books to make them illegible.

Here are a few.  I might find more.

Luther

03_05_14_Gesu_Calvin_book_det_lr

Zwingli

03_05_14_Gesu_Zwingli_book_det

Calvin

03_05_14_Gesu_Calvin_book_det

Meanwhile, since our church architecture tells present and future generation about our Catholic identity at the time it was built, let’s have a few shots from inside the church.

The cupola:

06_11_09_gesu_cupola

The Holy Name of Jesus (which in its iteration at Georgetown the Jesuits covered over when Obama spoke there):

06_11_09_gesu_IHS

A glimpse of me, shooting the photo of the ceiling of the nave in a mirror angled just so for viewing ease.

06_11_09_mirrorJTZ

The altar with the arm of St. Francis Xavier

03_05_14_Gesu_altar_Francis_Xavier

03_05_14_Gesu_Francis_Xavier_relic

My favorite version of the Sacred Heart, which you can find repeated all over Rome, in a small chapel to the Epistle side of the sanctuary.

03_05_14_Gesu_Sacred_Heart

In the same chapel, St. Francis preaching to the birds

03_05_14_Gesu_Francis_Assisi_birds

 

And it wouldn’t be a visit to Rome without supper…

14_10_21_caprese

14_10_21_vongole

14_10_21_coniglio

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12 Responses to 31 July – St. Ignatius of Loyola: Jesuits and heretics… and tautology

  1. Great little tour. Thanks!

  2. Very nice! I wish more Jesuits would read the works of their predecessors.

  3. Henry Edwards says:

    Notice anything missing?

    The Church militant is, alas, no longer.

    ICEL 2011
    O God, who raised up Saint Ignatius of Loyola in your Church
    to further the greater glory of your name,
    grant that by his help we may imitate him
    in fighting the good fight on earth
    and merit to receive with him a crown in heaven.

  4. Mike says:

    Thank you for sparing your readers a view of the Cranmer table and lectern at the Gesù, which are appalling even by Jesuit standards. The accession of Clement XIV II can’t come fast enough for me.

  5. Absit invidia says:

    Was there and never noticed. Thanks for putting context into these sacred images. There is so much depth in our art and architecture that we often have no idea about. Thanks again!

  6. Boniface says:

    I offered a private intention at mass today for the reform of that once-great and glorious order, the history of which glitters with some of the greatest martyrs, saints, defenders of true orthodoxy, and doctors of the Church. We are all aware of the tremendous problems and scandals that today plague them in spite of the presence of many faithful Jesuits within their midst, but for the sake of their glorious founder, on this his feast day, let’s simply redouble our efforts to pray and do penance for their return to their original charism, which, if revived, would set the world on fire, no? That is surely more pleasing to God than snarky Jesuit-bashing.

  7. Boniface says:

    Il Gesu has long been one of my favorite churches in Rome, having been there many times. It bursts at the seams with Counter-“Reformation” glory and baroque gilt and marble, as these pictures show. Thanks for the details I wasn’t aware of, Fr Z – the presence and then awful removal of the gilt lettering of Calvin and Luther’s names. How sad, and frankly, disrespectful of the artwork’s historical integrity. Does anyone know of a source for color photos of those details pre-removal? Would love to use them in my lecture slides.

    [Somewhere in on some hard drive, I have a photo of the spine of the book before the letters were removed.]

  8. The original Mr. X says:

    Let’s have your perfect renderings of the prayers.

    Well, since I could never resist a translation exercise…

    Deus, qui ad maiorem tui nominis gloriam propagandam, novo per beatum Ignatium subsidio militantem Ecclesiam roborasti: concede; ut, eius auxilio et imitatione certantes in terris, coronari cum ipso mereamur in caelis.

    O God, who to spread more widely the glory of thy name didst through the blessed Ignatius strengthen thy Church militant with a fresh reinforcement: grant that we, who by his help and example struggle here upon Earth, may merit to be crowned with him in Heaven.

    Deus, qui ad maiorem tui nominis gloriam propagandam
    beatum Ignatium in Ecclesia tua suscitasti,
    concede, ut, eius auxilio et imitatione certantes in terris,
    coronari cum ipso meramur in caelis.

    O God, who spread more widely the glory of thy name didst raise up in thy Church the blessed Ignatius: grant that we, who by his help and example struggle here upon Earth, may merit to be crowned with him in Heaven.

    Rather less than perfect, I’m afraid, but that’s the best I could manage so soon before bedtime.

  9. LJC says:

    The Sacred Heart Chapel at the Gesu is my favorite place to pray in Rome.

  10. Boniface says:

    Fr Z, if you find the photo(s), I would be so grateful if you would send! I will email another time.

  11. Tom in NY says:

    “The memorial of St. Ignatius of Loyola, a priest. He was born a Spaniard in Cantabria, and led his life in the royal court and army. Later, after taking a serious wound, he turned to God. He completed his theology studies at Paris and brought in his first companions, whom he later established as the Society of Jesus in Rome. There, he exercised a fruitful ministry, both in written works and forming disciples, to the greater glory of God.”
    Ut dicitur, lingua latina una sententia, anglica tres loquiur.
    Gratias patribus SJ, qui mihi litteras latinas et graecas docuit, ago.
    Salutationes omnibus.

  12. Tom in NY says:

    Erratum: “docuerunt” in loco “docuit.”