“Here comes the choochoo!”

At NLM, Peter Kwasniewski easily handles the facile notions of Msgr. M. Francis Mannion at the ultra-progressivist Pray Tell about Latin and vernacular in the Church’s sacred liturgy.  In a nut shell, if people can’t understand the language (Latin) they will stop going to Mass, hence we have to have the vernacular.  Also, even if young people today seem to be attracted to Latin, that’ll soon pass.   I’m a little surprised that Mannion would go to the zoo like this.  Perhaps he was writing for a particular audience.

Peter ably dismantles Mannion.   I don’t have to do that here.

I would add, however, that reducing the language of our sacred rites the equivalent of a spoonful of pureed carrots and “Here comes the choochoo!” played a decisive role – not exclusive – in the constant drift of people out of our churches, men into anything but our seminaries, and respect for the Church in the public square down the drain.

As Peter touches, what is it that we are trying to “understand” in our rites?  Mystery.  Also, the content of our rites properly grasped (not twisted into the usual modern enclosed circular mutual affirmation hour it has become in so many places) is really hard.

What about Mass is easy?

If we can admit that, yes, this is really hard stuff (NB: my use of choochoo language for Pray Tell readers… and choochoo is better than airplane because of global warming) then perhaps we can take the next step and admit that the signs and gestures and language of Mass might help us encounter Mystery if it is hard.  There is an apophatic dimension of our rites that is mostly neglected.

I often say here, “We are our rites.”

If our rites are facile, then what are we?

 

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Does anyone have a 1959 Cantus Passionis? Post-1955?

You know what would be really useful? A reprint of the 1959 Cantus Passionis. I think that was the last version published before the Flood struck.

It could be that the traditional movement is heading in the direction of the pre-1955 Holy Week… and other rites. It could very well be. In that case, there are still quite a few editions available, even in the three volumes, of the Cantus Passionis. But given that there wasn’t a very long period to settle in after 1955 before the massive and largely uneeded, unsought innovations were artificially imposed by the rogues of the Consilium, there aren’t many copies of the 1959 edition around.

Does anyone out there have one?

Can we work something out for a reprint or a high quality two-color PDF that we could print and bind?

And before some well-intentioned folks jump in with, “I have a 1953 version!  Will that help?”  Well…. no, given that I’m looking for a post 1955 edition, not a pre-1955 edition.

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LENTCAzT 2019 34 – Monday the 5th Week of Lent: Repent to avert destruction

These daily 5 minute podcasts are intended to give you a small boost every day, a little encouragement in your own use of this holy season.

Today is Monday after Passion Sunday, Monday of the 5th Week of Lent

I provide these especially in gratitude to benefactors who help me and this blog.

 

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SPACEWEATHER: Strange Northern Lights!

This is from SpaceWeather…. very cool.

I’ll bet this freaked out a lot of people… though there aren’t a lot of people up there.

___

ROCKETS DUMP CHEMICALS INTO NORTHERN LIGHTS: Last night (April 5th) in Norway, researchers at the Andøya Space Center launched two sounding rockets into a minor geomagnetic storm. The results were out of this world. Aurora tour guide Kim Hartviksen photographed glowing blobs of blue and purple caused by the rockets dumping chemical powders into the storm:


Photo credit: Kim Hartviksen of Aurora Addicts

“Residents for hundreds of miles were taken by surprise by these strange lights, which prompted calls to the police and ‘The aliens are coming!’ hysteria!” says Chris Nation who runs the Aurora Addicts guiding service.

When the night began, Nation, Hartviksen, and their clients were treated to a display of auroras, ignited by a stream of solar wind buffeting Earth’s magnetic field. “As the auroras started to ebb away, our friends at Andøya launched their rockets into the fading lights,” says Nation. “The show began anew as the rockets released their payload into the upper atmosphere.”

An automated webcam operated by Chad Blakely of Lights over Lapland in Abisko, Sweden, caught the first puffs of powder emerging from the rockets. “It looked like an invasion of UFOs,” says Blakley.

“Soon the glowing blobs evolved into more complicated structures–like two giant squid dancing in the northern sky with an impressive aurora display as its backdrop,” decribes Blakley. “Our webcam has been taking a picture every five minutes for nearly 10 years. These images are by far the most exciting I’ve ever seen it record.”

The name of the sounding rocket mission is AZURE–short for Auroral Zone Upwelling Rocket Experiment. Its goal is to measure winds and currents in the ionosphere, a electrically-charged layer of the Earth’s atmosphere where auroras appear. Specifically, the researchers are interested in discovering how auroral energy might percolate down toward Earth to influence the lower atmosphere.

The twin rockets deployed two chemical tracers: trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and abarium/strontium mixture. These mixtures create colorful clouds that allow researchers to visually track the flow of neutral and charged particles, respectively. According to NASA, which funded the mission, the chemicals pose no hazard to residents in the region. Aurora alerts: SMS textemail.

Update–a movie! “Here is my realtime video of the surprise rocket launch last night from NASA/ASC,” reports Ole Salomonsen of Tromsø, Norway. “I was shocked when I saw this in the night sky facing north, I was not aware of the launch.

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Wherein Fr. Z makes an appeal

Dear readers, this is an appeal.

Your use of my links to stuff on Amazon or your use of my search box on the right sidebar provides important income.

Every time you enter Amazon through my links or that search box, I get a small percentage of whatever you purchase.

I cannot see who buys what.  I have no idea who you are.

Once you use my link or searchbox, you don’t have to keep going back to the link or searchbox for other things: Amazon remembers, during that session, how you got there.

There is a reader who alerts me to purchases made for his workplace. He’s in charge of that, and he uses my searchbox to enter Amazon.   If you are in charge of making orders, perhaps you could do the same.

If you find something you want to get, highlighted the text of the item (Ctrl+C), and paste it into my searchbox (Ctrl+V).

The percentage which I get per item is small.  Many people with small purchases makes a huge difference over the course of a month.

Take a couple more seconds to buy that gizmo.  Come over to this blog and use my searchbox.

The searchbox is toward the top on the right.

Thanks for considering this.  It is extremely helpful.

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Minimalist Catholics or More?

Fr. Jerabek, at his blog, has a good reminder about Lenten penance, and Fridays, and fasting and abstinence.

All Fridays of the year are days of penance.  Fridays of Lent are more specific. All Catholics who have completed 14 years of age are to abstain from meat on Fridays of Lent.

Does this bind the Catholic on pain of sin?

The bishops – who were given authority to adjust the universal law for this regions – have so relaxed the obligations that there is barely anything there to move the Catholic to do penance.

The idea back in the 1960’s was that people should want to do penance.  That would be better than doing penance out of obligation.  They, with Paul VI, were optimistic.  They weren’t, however, realistic about human nature.  Once the laws were relaxed hardly anyone did penance after.

The same thing happen among the clergy.

In the older, traditional form of Mass, in the Missale Romanum, there were indications that certain defects in the celebration of Mass were mortal sins.   Among a few priests (especially those tainted by a kind of Sulpician/Irish jansenism) this prompted scrupulosity.  However, once the clarity was removed, priests started doing what they wanted.

Laws are helpful when the spirit and flesh are weak.

In any event, don’t be minimalist Catholics, just getting away with things within the strict bounds of law.

It seems to me we are living in a time when, as the Church is being slowly flayed and broken and diminished, even by her pastors, we need more prayer and more acts of penance and reparation, not fewer or the minimum.

 

 

 

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Your Sunday Sermon Notes and Passion Sunday POLL: veils on images

Was there a good point made during the sermon you heard for your Mass of obligation this  5th Sunday of Lent (Novus Ordo).

From this Sunday, traditionally called 1st Sunday of the Passion, it is customary to veil images in churches.  In the Gospel in traditional Form of the Roman Rite we hear:

Tulérunt ergo lápides, ut iácerent in eum: Iesus autem abscóndit se, et exívit de templo.  … They therefore took up stones to cast at Him; but Jesus hid Himself, and went out from the temple.

What is going on where you are?

This is a fine old tradition.  It has to do with deprivation of the senses and the liturgical dying of the Church in preparation for the Lord’s tomb and resurrection.

We do this to sense something of the humiliation of the Lord as he enters His Passion, something of His interior suffering.

We are also being pruned during Lent.  From Septuagesima onward we lose things bit by bit in the Church’s sacred liturgy until, at the Vigil, we are even deprived of light itself.  The Church is liturgically dying.

We are our rites.

Choose your best answer.  Anyone can vote, but only registered and approved users can comment.   Let us know what you saw!

At my Latin Rite church, for this 1st Passion Sunday (5th of Lent) - 2019 - I saw:

View Results

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LENTCAzT 2019 33 – Passion Sunday, the 5th of Lent: Getting ready for the tomb

These daily 5 minute podcasts are intended to give you a small boost every day, a little encouragement in your own use of this holy season.

Today is Passion Sunday, the 5th of Lent.

We are drawing closer to Jerusalem.

I provide these especially in gratitude to benefactors who help me and this blog.

 

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VIDEO: Archbishop – ooops – “consecrates” whisky instead of wine.

Wait long enough and that hardly-to-be-imagined thing will happen.

Holy Church has been at this Holy Mass thing for a really long time and in really diverse circumstances.  Hence, she has been through a great many “What if X happens…?” situations.

Wisely, and like the good mother she is, the Church used to tell us what to do, at least with general principles, so we could correct the situation and get on with it.

“What to do”, for example, “if a spider drops into the chalice after the consecration? … if a mouse runs across the altar and runs away with a host? … if the celebrant drops dead between the consecrations? … if it is discovered at the time of Communion that the wine for Mass was corrupt or had turned and wasn’t valid?”

Not to worry. Armed with first principles, priests know what to do!

Take for example the recent Mass in Malta when the celebrant, Archbp. Scicluna, decided at the time of Communion that – surprise! – that was whiskey in that cruet and not wine.

I guess the sacristan was storing the ALTAR WINE bottle along side the ALLT-A-BAINNE.   I mean, if you squint and know the right pronunciation, hey!  They’re pretty close, right?  Of course, a sacristan would want to keep those bottles in a place where they’d be, you know, “safe”.

So, the Archbishop gets a snoot full of Scotch – O Lord let it have been a single Malta – and informs the concelebrant… who immediately tried it!  As one does.

You can hear them… “whisky… whisky…”, at which the camera lists to starboard to focus on a picture of a cleric. (Please leave your Graham Greene cracks at the door.)

So, here’s is what is supposed to happen next.

Once the substance in the chalice is determined to be invalid, you must take steps. Namely,

13. If the celebrant notices before the consecration of the Blood, even if the Body has already been consecrated, that there is no wine in the chalice, or no water, or neither wine nor water, he should immediately put in wine and water, make the offering as above and consecrate, beginning with the words Simili modo, etc.

14. If after the words of the Consecration he notices that there was no wine in the chalice, but only water, he is to pour the water into some vessel, put wine and water into the chalice and consecrate, starting again from the words Simili modo, etc.

15. If he notices this after consuming the Body, or after drinking the water in question, he is to set out another host to be consecrated, together with wine and water in the chalice, offer both, consecrate them and consume them, even though he is not fasting.

So, in this situation, having discovered that the stuff in the chalice was invalid matter, the celebrant should immediately require wine (and water) to be brought, probably with a new chalice, and a new host, and go through the two-fold consecration again.

Of course this situation in the video is complicated by the fact that it is a concelebration.   How do you do this discreetly to avoid scandal… never mind that it’s being televised and because of that damnable clip on microphone you are saying “Whiskey” to the whole world.

Moral of the story.  Don’t use clip on microphones!

Or, if you do, be sure to say the proper vesting prayer when putting it on.

Concede, Domine, virtutem labiis meis et prudentiam ad Tuam proclamandam veritatem, ut per indigni servi Tui vocem, vox Tui tonitrui in rota contremat terram.

One more thing before we break for a drink.

What constitutes valid matter, valid wine, for Mass?

For this spirited question we Unreconstructed Ossified Manualists turn to, of course, Tanqueray!

I am not ginning up a response to this important question.  Tanqueray is really a writer of manuals of theology, in this case Tanqueray’s tonic for the soul the Theologia Dogmatica.

It is of divine institution that the only valid substances for transubstantiation are, for the Body of the Lord bread made from wheat and, for the Precious Blood, wine made from grapes or raisins (dessicated grapes).

But the grapes also have to be ripe, which rules out “wine” such as verjus (I actually have some, for ancient Roman and Medieval recipes). It can be red, white, dry, sweet, whatever.  Some prefer red because it resembles blood.  Some prefer white because it is easier to clean the linens.

Sometimes questions come up about the use of wine which has very low alcohol content, called mustum, a wine which had the fermentation process halted by means of rapid freezing.  That is a valid substance because it is from grapes and the natural fermentation process began, making it wine.  It has an artificially low alcohol content, but mustum is consider valid wine.

However, there is the other end of spectrum to consider: wine which has an artificially high alcohol content.  Sometimes alcohol distilled from wine is added to wine in order to preserve it against spoiling, changing to vinegar.  In this case we have “fortified wine”.  The usual types of “fortified wine” we encounter are port, sherry, madeira, marsala, and vermouth.

Unreconstructed Ossified ManualistUnreconstructed Ossified ManualistLong ago it was established that fortified wines are valid matter so long as the wine-spirit added was distilled from grapes, that the quantity of alcohol added, together natural content from the fermentation, does not exceed 18% and that the additional alcohol is added during the process of fermentation.

Fathers.  If you have any doubts about the wine, don’t use it!

 

I would rule out vermouth, because herbs and so forth are added.  I would not go for sherry because, if I am not mistaken, the addition of the spirits takes place after fermentation.  Marsala seems to be okay, so long as it is 18% or less.  Vin Santo, from dessicated grapes, is fine.  As the name implies, it is wine for the altar! Port is valid, 18% or under.

Furthermore, this is a good reason why there are ecclesiastically approved makers of altar wines.  If you have a doubt, don’t screw around with anything that may not be valid.

Lastly, back to that single Malta Mass.  Do you suppose that the other cruet contained club soda?

Posted in "How To..." - Practical Notes, ASK FATHER Question Box, Lighter fare, Linking Back, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000 | Tagged , , | 18 Comments

LENTCAzT 2019 32 – Saturday of the 4th Week of Lent: Catechumens grow in the womb of their mother, the Church

These daily 5 minute podcasts are intended to give you a small boost every day, a little encouragement in your own use of this holy season.

Today is Saturday of 4th Week of Lent.

Today we hear about the ancient catechumens as they approach the final push.

I provide these especially in gratitude to benefactors who help me and this blog.

 

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Passiontide – Veiling of images in churches

We with Vespers today we have arrived at Passiontide.

From this Sunday, traditionally called 1st Sunday of the Passion, it is customary to veil images in churches.

In the Gospel in traditional Form of the Roman Rite we hear:

Tulérunt ergo lápides, ut iácerent in eum: Iesus autem abscóndit se, et exívit de templo. …

They therefore took up stones to cast at Him; but Jesus hid Himself, and went out from the temple.

And so, on this Sunday, the Church traditionally hides the Lord and other images with veils, usually purple.

This is a fine old tradition. It has to do with deprivation of the senses and the liturgical dying of the Church in preparation for the Lord’s tomb and resurrection. We do this to sense something of the humiliation of the Lord as he enters His Passion, something of His interior suffering.

We are also being pruned during Lent. From Septuagesima onward we lose things bit by bit in the Church’s sacred liturgy until, at the Vigil, we are even deprived of light itself. The Church is liturgically dying so she can enter the tomb with her Lord and rise with Him.

Last year at St. Mary’s in Pine Bluff.

20170402_073411_640

Later, I’ll post a POLL about this.

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BOOKS RECEIVED JUST IN TIME! Useful liturgical books for the entire year and for Holy Week

A couple days ago I received package from the nice folks at Preserving Christian Publications. “What”, quoth I, “could be in here?” Whereupon, I set it on the counter, got distracted and didn’t open it for a couple of days.

“Oh yeah,” quoth I, while chopping veg for my soup. Whereupon, I opened it and found treasure within.

They sent me a copy of their Liber Usualis, their Liber Brevior, and a new critter they made themselves, but which will be quite useful as we continue to recover our patrimony. See below.

The “cheaters” are for scale.

The books are all well-bound…

… and with ribbons, the Liber Usualis (“Useful Book”) having enough to cover your page changes for Vespers.

I have an older Liber that I had rebound, having withstood the test of years.  Of course it is as tight as the wallet of a Genovese arguing with Scots about the bar tab.

This Liber lies open.  You don’t have to engage in isometric finger exercises to use it.  “Useful!”

This is the last edition before the massive disruption, the 1963 with the 1962 rubrics and Gregorian (not modern) notation.  It has the rubrics in English, which some of you will find handy.  It is updated with the changes.

Note that they updated the Table to 2041.

COST: $76 – which is well below other printings of the Liber you might find.

This is not going to fall apart after a couple years of use, as many liturgical reprints do.

They have added supplements for, say, the Immaculate Heart of Mary (22 August) and some other chants for Septuagesima, extra Alleluia for Easter Season, etc.

The Liber Brevior is a shorter version of the Liber Usualis, the hours having been extracted leaving only chant notation for Holy Mass.

Here is the new critter.  Liber Hebdomadae Sanctae Cantus Gregoriani.

This has all of the chant for Palm Sunday through the Easter Vigil, but not Easter Sunday.  Hence, it has all of the office of Tenebrae.

Friends, we must recover our Catholic patrimony.  Preserving Christian Publications has provided some great tools of late.  You might recall that I received and reviewed their 1962 Parish Ritual HERE.  It expanded the Collectio Rituum (although it has one problem with the Divine Praises).   I liked it so much I ordered a second copy for the sacristy.

Those of you who want to form a schola cantorum… you have new resources.

Gosh, how times have changed since the 80’s and 90’s.

 

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PODCAzT 171: The strange birth of the Novus Ordo – 50 years later

This last week saw the 50th anniversary of the “birth” of the Novus Ordo – after an unnaturally swift gestation – on 3 April 1969 when Paul VI promulgated the Apostolic Constitution Missale Romanum.

Today I read for you, and I rant both before and after, an essay by Fr Hugh Somerville-Knapman, OSB, of Douay Abbey in Berkshire, England, called “The strange birth of the Novus Ordo”.

It is published at the Catholic Herald, 4 April 2019.

This essay drives home the incredible speed with which the liturgical changes were rammed through in the 1960’s.

I also talk about our Catholic identity and the need for stability of our traditional rites and how that plays with the Novus Ordo as it is today and as it will be in the near future.

Posted in Hard-Identity Catholicism, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, Our Catholic Identity, PODCAzT, Wherein Fr. Z Rants | Tagged , , , , | 13 Comments

LENTCAzT 2019 31 – Friday of the 4th Week of Lent: Christ’s sympathy with death and sorrow

These daily 5 minute podcasts are intended to give you a small boost every day, a little encouragement in your own use of this holy season.

Today is Friday of 4th Week of Lent and a 1st Friday.

Today we hear about how the Lord willed to experience what we experience.

I provide these especially in gratitude to benefactors who help me and this blog.

 

Posted in LENTCAzT, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, PODCAzT | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

4 April – St. Isidore of Seville, the Internet Prayer and You

I often forget to pray before using the internet. I sometimes fail in charity when using the internet.

This tool of social communication and research and entertainment has amazing upsides, but it also has spiritually deadly perils. We all should be very careful in how we use it – and through it – use each other, “use” in the finer sense of “treat” each other.

Today is the feast of St. Isidore of Seville, Bishop and Doctor (+4 April 636). He is not to be confused with St. Isidore the Farmer.

St. Isidore defended the faith against the Arian heresy, which was still around. It is amazing how tenacious heresy can be.  It still is around.

Some years ago there was chat about having St. Isidore proposed as the patron saint of the internet. He has NOT, however, officially been named such. Keep that in mind.

I was asked to write a prayer people could recite before using the internet. I wrote the prayer in Latin and submitted it, with a translation into English, to a bishop who gave it his approval.

This prayer is now all over the same internet (both with and without attribution!).

You will want to know why some people proposed St. Isidore for this role.

St. Isidore’s most notable work, the Etymologiae, us a massive encyclopedic work of 448 chapters in 20 volumes indexing just about everything people thought it was important to know at the time, rather like a primitive database.  I think that’s the connection.

You can, of course, pray to any saint in this matter, and nothing official about any patron for the internet has been handed down from the Congregation for the Causes of Saints (which is the competent dicastery of the Holy See in those matters).

Bottom line: people wanted a prayer for St. Isidore, and I wrote one. You should feel free to change the name to whatever saint you prefer. Others have proposed St. Maximilian Kolbe (+1941), St. Bernadine of Siena (+1444), St. Rita of Cascia (+1457), and the Archangel Gabriel (still around).

I am happy for people to use this prayer. I ask that you give attribution.

To see all the versions of the prayer which are now available, go

HERE

If you can offer a new translation (and audio recording by a native speaker) into a language missing from those I’ve archived, please send it. To email me, click HERE.

I would also like a video of the prayer in ASL, American Sign Language.

Meanwhile, here is the English.

A prayer before logging onto the internet:

Almighty and eternal God, who created us in Thine image and bade us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful, especially in the divine person of Thine Only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant, we beseech Thee, that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, Bishop and Doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Christ our Lord.   Amen.

Finally, I’m still waiting for an improved version in Klingon.

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