Tag Archives: St. Augustine

WDTPRS 2nd Sunday of Advent: “we escape neither the Enemy lion nor the glorious Lion of Judah”

Our Collect (once called the “Opening Prayer”) for the 2nd Sunday of Advent was not in the pre-Conciliar Missale Romanum but it was in the so-called Rotulus (“scroll”) of Ravenna, dated perhaps as early as the 5th century.
Omnipotens et misericors … Continue reading

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7 Ambrose: St. Edith Stein’s dialogue between Ambrose and Augustine

Today is the feast of St. Ambrose, who seemed to bring out both the worst and the best in people.
For example, St. Jerome couldn’t stand him. HERE
If you are interested in learning more about this titanic figure of the 4th … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – 24th Ordinary Sunday: “Do our prayers make a difference?”

The Collect for the 24th Ordinary Sunday was not in pre-Conciliar editions of the Roman Missal but it has an antecedent in the ancient Veronese Sacramentary among the prayers used during September.
Respice nos, rerum omnium Deus creator et rector, et, … Continue reading

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What is the best translation of St. Augustine’s “Confessions”?

On this glorious feast of St. Augustine, allow me to repost an answer to a question I get fairly often and answer off the blog:
QUAERITUR:
What is the best translation of St. Augustine’s Confessions?
It depends a little on who you are and … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – Trinity Sunday: Explain the Trinity? No problem!

At some point we wind up taking a stab at explaining the Trinity to someone.  Results vary.
Today, to get at the mystery of the Most Holy Trinity, let’s use the final prayer at Holy Mass in the venerable, traditional form … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – 6th Sunday of Easter: We are simultaneously risen, rising, and about to rise

Here is this week’s Collect, for the 6th Sunday of Easter in the Ordinary Form:
Fac nos, omnipotens Deus, hos laetitiae dies, quos in honorem Domini resurgentis exsequimur, affectu sedulo celebrare, ut quod recordatione percurrimus semper in opere teneamus.
This is an … Continue reading

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WDTPRS: Octave of Easter “in albis”, Quasimodo Sunday

In the post-Conciliar calendar this is the “Second Sunday of Easter.” It is sometimes called “Thomas Sunday” because of the Gospel reading about the doubting Apostle.
It is also famously called “Quasimodo Sunday” for the first word of the opening chant, … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – 2nd Sunday of Advent: LIONS!

“We escape neither the Enemy lion nor the glorious Lion of Judah”!
Our Collect (once called the “Opening Prayer”) for the 2nd Sunday of Advent was not in the pre-Conciliar Missale Romanum but it was in the so-called Rotulus (“scroll”) of … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – 28th Ordinary Sunday: “God crowns His own merits in us”

The elegant Collect for the 28th Ordinary Sunday has been used for centuries on the 16th Sunday after Pentecost according to the traditional Roman calendar.  This is a lovely prayer to sing.
Tua nos, quaesumus, Domine, gratia semper … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – 24th Ordinary Sunday: “Is God is our cosmic concierge?”

The Collect for the 24th Ordinary Sunday was not in pre-Conciliar editions of the Roman Missal but it has an antecedent in the ancient Veronese Sacramentary among the prayers used during September.
Respice nos, rerum omnium Deus creator et rector, et, … Continue reading

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29 August – Beheading of John the Baptist and diminishing returns

Today is the feast of the Beheading of John the Baptist.
I consider this (also) my name day, and in so many ways it is more appropriate for me than the Nativity of John in June.
The date of this feast has … Continue reading

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WDTPRS – 18th Ordinary Sunday: cold, clear reality

When the priest, alter Christus, says our prayers during Holy Mass, Christ, Head of the Body, speaks.
His words have power to form us.
Formed according to the mind of the Church, we Catholics then go out from Mass to shape our … Continue reading

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WDTPRS Ascension – Our humanity, “raised beyond the heights of archangels”

On my planet, this coming Sunday is the 7th Sunday after Easter, Ascension Thursday having fallen on Thursday.
In most places Ascension Thursday has been transferred to Sunday, but not with malice.  The notion the bishops had was to expose more … Continue reading

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4 May: St. Monica, widow

In the older, traditional Roman calendar today is the feast of the mother of St. Augustine, St. Monnica, widow.  She died in Ostia (Rome’s port) in 387, when she and her family were heading back to North Africa after Augustine’s … Continue reading

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WDTPRS: Low Sunday “in albis”, Quasimodo Sunday

In the post-Conciliar calendar this is the “Second Sunday of Easter.” It is sometimes called “Thomas Sunday” because of the Gospel reading about the doubting Apostle.
It is also famously called “Quasimodo Sunday” for the first word of the opening chant, … Continue reading

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Posted in EASTER, Liturgy Science Theatre 3000, WDTPRS | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments