ZENIT Interview with Cardinal DiNardo: ties Patristics, Liturgy, Summorum Pontificum

I am looking with pleasure at an ZENIT interview with the new Cardinal, Daniel DiNardo.   There some great things in this piece, you must pay attention to.  His Eminence touchs on Patristics, Liturgy and Summorum Pontificum.

I think it is becoming clearer why Pope Benedict chose this man to be a Cardinal.  I believe it may have to do more with who he is than the fact that Houston is a big city in the south of the USA.

Here is an excerpt that pertains to WDTPRS (watch the tie between Patristics and liturgy and Summorum Pontificum.  (Let’s do some source criticism).

First he speaks of the importance of Galveston-Houston, then he talks about seminarians and vocations.  Then…

My emphases and comments:

Q: Your archdiocese has a broad diversity of Catholic liturgical rites, including an Anglican Use parish, a former Anglican congregation that has joined the Catholic Church. How has this diversity of rites enriched the archdiocese?

Cardinal-designate DiNardo: I think the plurality of rites can be perplexing for some, but overall they present different avenues for encountering the rich liturgical tradition of the Church.

This diocese was established in 1847, and so it has a long history involving people from all over.

We have many people of East-Indian heritage who worship in the Syro-Malabar Rite, we have Maronites, Byzantine and Ruthenian Catholics, as well as the Anglican Use parish you mentioned.

That particular parish just built a beautiful new church and its members are growing.

Q: As a patristic scholar, [NB: Patristics – Card. DiNardo is an alumn of the Augustinianum in Rome, my school.] you have a deep appreciation for the Church’s sacred Tradition. Benedict XVI has in his pontificate underlined the importance of not rupturing with the Church’s past, and to provide continuity with its rich liturgical [liturgy] and theological traditions. In what ways can bishops implement the Holy Father’s program [The interviewer has the idea that Pope Benedict has a plan.  Could it, how do we put this, a "Marshall Plan"?] in their dioceses?

Cardinal-designate DiNardo: When I arrived in the archdiocese, I really didn’t find a lot of instances of discontinuity or rupture. [Note the terms.] There are always complaints with the way Mass is celebrated in some places, but my predecessor bishops were great moderating forces. Thus, the diocese avoided some of the problems found elsewhere associated with a rupture from the past.

With regard to the liturgy, I think we can take a cue from the liturgical piety of the Church Fathers. In the Fathers, you see an emphasis not only on the words said at Mass, but also the importance of the gestures of the liturgy. In other words, say the black, do the red.  [Get that?]

I also always emphasize unity in faith, meaning unity in the Creed. The Creed allows the Church to unite around a common set of beliefs. And knowing the Creed and what it means helps root the faithful in the great Tradition of the Church.

As I tell my seminarians, it is not enough to have the right sentiments about God; you actually have to know something. [I love this guy!] You have to know what the Church teaches and what theologians such as St. Augustine or St. Thomas said about particular doctrines.

The great challenge in handing on the faith is training the volunteer catechists who serve in our churches. Although we have revamped the catechetical programs as well as the guidelines for confirmation in our archdiocese, we need to find ways to encourage these volunteers to receive the necessary formation to be effective in their work, as well as deal with the problem of catechizing people from different cultures.

Here, the Catechism of the Catholic Church can serve as a great resource.

As far as "Summorum Pontificum," [NB: The interviewer did not ask him about Summorum Pontificum.] we have four parishes in the diocese where the extraordinary form of the Roman rite is said regularly, including one downtown parish where it is said daily.

I don’t see much of an increase in the number of parishes using the extraordinary form because there hasn’t been much of a demand thus far.

On the other hand, [He doesn’t have a closed mind or rigid position on the issue.] we have had discussions with a particular religious community about the possibility of establishing a personal parish that would allow for the full presence of the liturgical and devotional life associated with the Missal of Blessed John XXIII.

But due to the explosive growth in the archdiocese, I have no parish to give them. [A serious practical issue.] This group would have to raise the funds to establish such a parish. [Excellent!  He treats these people like adults!   If you can make it work, we can get something going.  This reminds me of what Bp. Rhoades did.]  But those discussions are at a very preliminary stage at this point.

The interview continues with other points.  However, this was the section of the interview that was of greatest interest to WDTPRS, where patristibloggers and those in reverent Roman liturgy unite!  Where people strive to:

 

 

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17 Responses to ZENIT Interview with Cardinal DiNardo: ties Patristics, Liturgy, Summorum Pontificum

  1. prof. basto says:

    Then Cardinal-designate DiNardo:

    …In other words, say the black, do the red.

    Oooohoo! Great!!!!! Love this man!
    Viva il Papa!

  2. woodyjones says:

    Cardinal DiNardo came to the said Anglican Usage parish while he was still the coadjutor archbishop here, to bless our new organ (in the newly built church building he praises), at a solemn Evensong service. He sang the prayers and gave a tremendous homily, perhaps indeed inspired by the beauty of the liturgy, in which he said that the Liturgy is the living stream of love coming from the Trinity down to us.

    God willing, His Eminence will do great things in Houston.

  3. RichR says:

    I was a member of the Anglican Use parish in San Antonio (Our Lady of the Atonement), and sang in their choir for a few years. The liturgy is, in my opinion, the most beautiful English liturgy ever. It inspired me to start the men’s Gregorian chant group in my hometown parish. I have also visited the Anglican Use parish in Houston (OLO Walsingham). Their website has photos of the new church building (very impressive). I still want to get down there for a EF Mass, but it is a 2 hours drive.

    A couple of weeks before the consistitory, then-designate DiNardo was at the student center here in College Station visiting the parish. It was neat to see him in person after having read about him on this website. He was smiling just as big as he is in the above photo.

    I hope the Lord gives him a ton of grace. “Bishoping” is a hard calling. “Cardinal-ing” is an even deeper responsibility. Reading the OP of the Zenit article gives me joy that this Prince of the Church understands the importance of liturgy.

  4. woodyjones says:

    For photos of Our Lady of Walsingham, see http://www.walsingham-church.org/

  5. RichR says:

    If all the mainstream parishes are being utilized fully, then to convert one to a Traditional personal parish would make the “locals” have to search elsewhere for a new parish. I could understand it if there was a parish about to close its doors due to underutilization, but Houston is a packed city.

    I would hope that if there is an existing EF Mass community, they and their priest might petition H.E. for their parish to be converted.

  6. Pater, OSB says:

    I was present at Our Lady of Walsingham when (then coadjutor) Archbishop DiNardo celebrated the Anglican Use Mass on Trinity Sunday AND confirmed several of the parishoners…. STUNNING all around! I was also struck by the people who (at the reception afterward) mentioned that they had left the Catholic Church and only returned once they happened upon Our Lady of Walsingham. I wonder if the Anglican Use isn’t (somewhat) more in line with that the Council fathers had in mind concerning the reform/’renewal’ of the liturgy.

  7. Tom says:

    [EDITED OUT BY Fr. Z – People: Please don’t trash Card. DiNardo on this blog on the very day of his being made Cardinal.]

  8. Dear Fr. Z. (Father, bless!):

    Thank you for your wonderful website, and for your link to and review of this artical on dDi naro Cardinal DiNardo. It is a pleasure for me to learn of ANY prelate in the Roman Chu8rch who has a knowledge of and a love for the Fathers. That lack is one of the principal reasons that I am no longer Roman Catholic, and am instead Eastern Catholic.

    Again, thank you.

    Very truly yours,

    Bernard Brandt

    P.S., my apologies for the typos, but your comment box does not permit me to see, let along thang, such errors.

  9. Matt Q says:

    HURRAH!! ONE MORE authentic Roman bishop, and an American too yet. Things are definitely looking up for us in this regard.

    God bless these bishops, and all those who received their Red Hat today.

  10. michigancatholic says:

    He said, “I tell my seminarians, it is not enough to have the right sentiments about God; you actually have to know something.

    SWEET! I like this guy too.

  11. Tom says:

    Cardinal DiNardo stated that he doesn’t “see much of an increase in the number of parishes using the extraordinary form because there hasn’t been much of a demand thus far.”

    Please tell me whether the following makes sense. Why don’t our Cardinals, bishops and priests teach Catholics why we should be interested in the TLM?

    There isn’t much interest today in Confession. The isn’t much interested today in going to Mass. Attendance at Mass is very low.

    But our Cardinals, bishops and priests don’t cease teaching their people that it’s important to go to Confession and Mass.

    Why not apply that same principle to the TLM? Cardinals, bishops and priests should teach Catholics why it’s important to love the TLM.

    Teach them why it’s important to pray in Latin, face to the East at Mass, wear veils…why it’s important to pray the Canon in a low voci.

    Our teachers could do everything possible to at least instill into Catholics a sense of love for the TLM, which is our ancient liturgical Tradition.

    We instill (or at least attempt to instill) into our children a sense of love for America’s tradition…Founding Fathers, Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Veterans’ Day, etc.

    Each society attempts to hand down its tradition to its youth.

    Cardinal DiNardo could promote the TLM within his diocese with great vigor. He could teach on the TLM…explain the history of the TLM and its mystical nature…encourage each priest within his diocese to celebrate the TLM.

    He could explain to his people why it’s important for them to love and cheris their ancient liturgical tradition.

    The same applies to each Cardinal and bishop.

    Cardinals and bishops spent decades teaching and promoting the Ordinary Form to their people. We were taught as to why it was important to embrace the liturgical changes.

    Why not apply that same effort to teach Catholics why it’s important to embrace the TLM and the ancient liturgical tradition?

  12. Tito says:

    Fr. Z,

    Thank you for your kind comments and observations concerning our new Cardinal DiNardo.

    “Cardinal DiNardo:… There are always complaints with the way Mass is celebrated in some places…”

    I know many of these ‘complainers’, they have valid reasons to complain, but they complain too much.

    “Cardinal DiNardo:…but my predecessor bishops were great moderating forces…”

    His eminence is probably referring to Arcbishop Fiorenza, who’s “moderating” equaled “ignoring” many problems, fortunately, they weren’t serious problems.

    “Cardinal DiNardo:…As far as “Summorum Pontificum,” we have four parishes in the diocese where the extraordinary form of the Roman rite is said regularly, including one downtown parish where it is said daily…”

    I believe his eminence is referring to Annunciation Church. They (we, I attend Sunday Mass there), are in discussions to have the extraordinary form of the Roman rite celebrated daily. Right now they are deciding what time. Unless I’m wrong, they haven’t start-yet!

    “Cardinal DiNardo:…I don’t see much of an increase in the number of parishes using the extraordinary form because there hasn’t been much of a demand thus far…”

    The demand is there, the problem lies with the parishioners not asking for the extraordinary form. Let me correct that, ‘former’ parishioners. There are two SSPX churches and several ‘independent’ Catholic churches (one of which was started by Mel Gibson & his father) that cater to this crowd. You could say that Archbishop Fiorenza’s ‘moderating=ignoring’ demand for the TLM pushed these Catholics to SSPX & independent chapels.

    “Cardinal DiNardo:…On the other hand, we have had discussions with a particular religious community about the possibility of establishing a personal parish that would allow for the full presence of the liturgical and devotional life associated with the Missal of Blessed John XXIII…”

    Cardinal DiNardo is probably referring here to the Fraternal Society of St. Peter. Due to obedience, I am not at liberty to provide detailed information here. But I can say this is extremely positive and many Houstonians are giddy with pleasure with Cardinal DiNardo’s openness and orthodoxy concerning this matter.

    “Cardinal DiNardo:… But due to the explosive growth in the archdiocese, I have no parish to give them. This group would have to raise the funds to establish such a parish. But those discussions are at a very preliminary stage at this point…”

    ‘Very preliminary stage’ is correct (or I agree). The archdiocese can easily fill up to three large new parishes, but due a lack of vocations, whom his eminence inherited from Archbishop Fiorenza, this is a slow and gradual process.

    Archbishop DiNardo is a liturgical purist and he voted for ALL the recommended changes to the liturgy at a USCCB vote on it. His eminence is very knowledgeable about our beautiful Catholic faith and is an engaging and sincere person. His homilies attract well deserved praise and he packs them in when he visits local churches.

    He is vey patient and kind, and can I say again that he is very orthodox and highly charitable (an ingredient missing among the hard-orthodox Catholics).

    Yes, there are minor complaints about him, he certainly earned his biretta mostly for his excellent grasp of patristics and theology more than the ‘growing Catholic population’ of Houston. Speaking flawless Italian also helps.

    In Christ,

    Tito

  13. Michael says:

    To add to what Tito said, I am also unaware of which “four parishes” he is referring to because I am only aware of 2 or maybe 3, but then “regularly” must mean once a week or every now and then. Anunciation at the moment only offers a TLM on Sundays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays.

  14. Richard says:

    Pardon my ignorance, but what is the Anglican Use? Never heard of it. Where can I find out what it is and where it came from, etc.
    Thank you.
    Richard

  15. Michael says:

    Richard,
    The Anglican Use was set up for Anglican converts. I don’t know if the other Sacraments are different, but the Mass is pretty much the High Anglican Liturgy (in english of course) but with some adaptations. Unfortunately, the Novus Ordo offertory prayers are used, but other than that, it seems much more beautiful and sacred than the typical Novus Ordo Mass. I’ve never witnessed one myself but I am curious. As for where to read about it, I would start at Wikipedia.

  16. Richard says:

    Thanks, Michael. I’ll check it out on Wikipedia. What mystifies me is the knowledge that Anglican orders were declared invalid long ago. How, then, can an Anglican liturgy have any value or be allowed to be used when an invalidly ordained man joins the Church? What am I missing? Perhaps Wiki will clarify some of these problems.

  17. David2 says:

    Richard, I think your comment confutes two different but related issues; the validity of Angican \”orders\” is to be distinguished from the validity of the Eucharist. An invalidly ordained Angican man who joins the Church still has to be re-ordained, despite the existence of the Anglican use. Anglican prayers can be used, insofar as they are consistent with the Catholic faith. So, for example, the Anglican \”Ordinal\” cannot be used (because it denies the sacrificial and sacramental nature of the priesthood) and does not confer apostolic succession. Insofar as Anglican Holy Communion prayers can be modified to express the Catholic Faith in terms of transubstantiation and the propitiary sacrifice of the Mass, they have been allowed limited use. Therefore, a priest, once validly ordained could use a consecration formula approved by the Church, even if it is derived from a heretical sect. That\’s how I understand it, anyway…