Your Sunday Sermon Notes: 2nd Sunday after Easter (N.O. 3rd of Easter) 2024

Too many people today are without good, strong preaching, to the detriment of all. Share the good stuff.

Was there a GOOD point made in the sermon you heard at your Mass of obligation for the 2nd Sunday Sunday after Easter?  Novus Ordo – 3rd Sunday of Easter.

Tell about attendance especially for the Traditional Latin Mass.  I hear that it is growing.  Of COURSE.

Any local changes or (hopefully good) news?

A taste of my thoughts from the other place: HERE

[…]

The liturgy’s primary aim is to portray the present, not the past, to give grace and life along with history.  You must, therefore, give the parable a present day context, apply it personally.  After each sentence, stop and say: Christ is doing this today – and to help me.

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WDTPRS – 2nd Sunday after Easter (Vetus Ordo): descent and ascent, exit and return

This Sunday in the Novus Ordo is the 3rd Sunday OF Easter.  This Sunday in the Traditional Calendar is the 2nd Sunday AFTER Easter.   This probably reflects how, traditionally Romans tend to count.  But I am already digressing.

Let’s see what happened to today’s Collect in the 1962 Missale Romanum when it was ported over into the 1970MR.

COLLECT (1962MR): 

Deus, qui Filii tui humilitate iacentem mundum erexisti: fidelibus tuis sanctam concede laetitiam; ut, quos perpetuae mortis eripuisti casibus, gaudiis facias perfrui sempiternis.

With a slight variation this prayer was in the Gelasian Sacramentary on the Sunday after the Octave of Easter, which is today’s Sunday: Deus, qui in filii tui humilitatem iacentem mundum erexisti, laetitiam concede <fidelibus tuis>, ut quos perpetuae <mortis> eripuisti casibus, gaudiis facias sempiternis perfruere. So, not many changes. (The words in < > were illegible or missing in the manuscripts, and were supplied by Leo Cunibert Mohlberg, editor of the critical edition of the Gelasian.) The infinitive of perfruor, deponent, is really perfrui. However perfruere, here, is also an infinitive: once in a while, like today, active forms crept into use for what are normally deponents.

In the meantime, think laterally: isn’t the last phrase of the Collect similar to the end of the prayer recited after the Salve Regina? “Grant us your servants, we pray you O Lord God, to enjoy perpetual health of mind and body, and, by the glorious intercession of blessed Mary ever-Virgin, may we be delivered from present sorrow and enjoy everlasting happiness (aeterna perfrui laetitia).”

The themes in the aforementioned are similar to today’s Collect in that there is a shift from sorrow to joy through God’s providential gift.

Moreover, when the priest vests for Holy Mass, traditionally he says special prayers while putting on each vestment. For the alb, the symbol of our baptism, he prays:

“Make me white, O Lord, and cleanse my heart, so that having been made white in the Blood of the Lamb, I may enjoy everlasting joys (gaudiis perfruar sempiternis).”

There is similar vocabulary in the other vesting prayers, which could once be found posted in every sacristy in the world. I use them daily and exhort other priests to do so as well.

My hook for these last comments was the verb perfruor, one of a few famous deponent verbs used normally and classically with the ablative case: utor, abutor, fruor, fungor, potior and vescor.

In different periods of Latin these verbs could have active forms, as we saw above, and could also take objects in the accusative or even genitive. In modern liturgical usage they are deponents and always get ablative “objects”. Actually, these aren’t really objects, but rather a kind of instrument: e.g., vescor, “I feed myself from…”; fruor, “I get fruit/benefit from…”; etc. A good grammar explains how these verbs work.

Latin Students: If you want a really good Latin grammar get the superb Gildersleeve & Lodge, or fully, Gildersleeve’s Latin Grammar (enlarged with the additional help of Gonzalez Lodge).

Basil L. Gildersleeve said, and this is true in the world of WDTPRS,

“No study of literature can yield its highest result without the close study of language, and consequently the close study of grammar.”

Two words in the prayer, gaudium and laetitia, can be rendered into English with the same word “joy” and variations. We don’t want to give undue emphasis to the different sorts of “joy” possible with different words. However, our chockablock L&S states that gaudium suggest a joy which is interior whereas laetitia suggests a unrestrained joy having outward expression, even though L&S also says gaudium in the plural (as it is in our prayer) can also be “the outward expressions of joy”.

In a supplement to the L&S, A. Souter’s Glossary of Later Latin to 600 A.D., we discover that gaudium is “everlasting blessedness” while laetitia is simply “prosperity”. So, in Souter we still uncover something of the spiritual versus material distinction.

Blaise/Dumas, or Le Vocabulaire Latin des principaux thèmes liturgiques, implies that laetitia and gaudium are pretty much the same thing.

QUAERITUR: Are these distinctions really all that important?

The dictates of ancient rhetoric (and this prayer is ancient and rhetorical) required copia verborum, a richness of vocabulary to avoid boring repetition. Nevertheless, each word gives us “joy”, but with shades of meaning. Perhaps a solution is found in L&S’s explanation that gaudium is “like our ‘joy’, for an object which produces joy, a cause or occasion of joy”. You might think in terms of someone saying, “You are a real joy to me!”

I am reminded of the now archaic use of “joy” found in Patrick O’Brian’s great Aubrey/Maturin books.  When they take a prize, they are greeted with “Wish you joy of the capture, sir!”  The thing captured is a joy which is the cause of the felt joy.   In Post Captain, Stephen tells Jack,

“Compulsion is the death of friendship, joy.”

Here we probably see an Irish use, but “joy” is a form of address for a friend who is the source of joy for Stephen.   Sometimes in our liturgical prayers abstract concepts which are characteristics of God, such as majestas, can be read as a form of address: Tua maiestas… Your Majesty.  Augustine, preaching to his flock, would address them almost as an abstract group, Your Charity”.   But I digress again.

For us who have been raised up from our sins and who die in God’s friendship, the object which will produce joy is, in this world, the state of grace and a clean conscience and, in the next life, the Beatific Vision and Communion of Saints.

L&S indicates that erigo, giving us erexisti, means “to raise up, set up, erect” and, analogously, “to arouse, excite” and “cheer up, encourage.” The verb iaceo (in the L&S find this under jaceo) has many meanings, such as “to lie” as in “lie sick or dead, fallen” and also “to be cast down, fixed on the ground” and “to be overcome, despised, idle, neglected, unemployed.” Humilitas is “lowness”. In Blaise/Dumas, humilitas has a more theological meaning in the “abasement” of the God Incarnate who took the form of a “slave” (cf. Philippians 2:7). Blaise/Dumas cites this Collect in the entry for humilitas.

LITERAL TRANSLATION:

O God, who raised up a fallen world by the abasement of Your Son, grant holy joy to Your faithful; so that You may cause those whom You snatched from the misfortunes of perpetual death to enjoy delights unending.

Our Collect views material creation as an enervated body, wounded, weakened by sin, lying near death in the dust whence it came. In the sin of our First Parents all creation was wounded. The harmony there ought to have been between the rest of material creation and man, its steward, has been damaged.

Because of the Fall, the whole cosmos was put under the bondage of the Enemy, the “prince of this world” (cf. John 10:31 and 14:30). This is why when we bless certain things, and baptize people, there is – traditionally – an exorcism first, to rip the object or person from the grip of the world’s “prince” and give it to the King. God is liberator. He rouses us up from being prone upon the ground.

THIS is true “liberation theology”!

He grasps us, pulling us upward out of sin and death. He directs us again toward the joys possible in this world, first, and then definitively in the next.

But we must get back to our feet: rise again.

Our Savior rose for this reason.

We see in many of our ancient Roman prayers a pattern of descent and ascent, of exit and return.

Before the Resurrection there is the Passion. Before exaltation there is humiliation.

The descent, exit, Passion and humiliation bring an even more exalted joy which will embrace the entirety of man in both soul and body, the interior and the outward human person.

Ultimately, Joy Itself will embrace the entire cosmos.

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ROME 24/4– Day 24: Fave and vongole with The Great Roman™

The time of the sun’s rise on Rome was 06:30.

We shall be deprived of its gaze at 19:51.

The Ave Maria should ring at 20.

It is the Feast of St. Martin, Pope and Martyr.  San Martino ai Monti is a historically important church in Rome.

Speaking of which, an inscription in the church of the saints who are interred in the crypt.

Speaking of Card. Baronius, here is the holy card the Oratorians are putting about for the cause for their distinguished brother.  I got a few of these at the Chiesa Nuova where his tomb is. Alas, that chapel is always locked up and you can’t get near it.

Good grief, look at that prayer.  It’s as if Spanky and Gang are running a cause.  “We can use Mr. Jones’s barn and my mom can sew the costumes!”  Could they not have run this by some person who knows English?

About the Ave Maria, which I thought I heard the other night.  Last night I set my alarm for shortly before 20:00 and listened.  Sure enough, there was a chime that wasn’t the hour and wasn’t an Angelus/Regina Caeli and wasn’t a “Hey!  Mass is starting!” Bell either.  We shall see.  Then it is to be determined where it is coming from!

Hearing news.  As I reported before, and for which I asked for prayers, I had suddenly lost most of my hearing in my left ear.  Slowly but surely my hearing has improved.   It’s nearly all back in my left.  I’ve not had any pain from this.  No idea.   I wouldn’t rule out “ol’ scratch” having a go at me.  After all, the Enemy tends to strike the left side of the body.

Anyway, I am glad that I am on the mend.  Now I wish my knee would stop hurting.

Welcome registrant:

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I spotted fresh peas in the market.  Monday!

The Great Roman™ came for supper last night.  We started out with pecorino and fresh fava beans, a great combo.

We then dug into some spaghetti and a kilo of clams.  I am patient in making my spaghetti alle vongole.   They were really good.  I shot this just before adding some pepper and pepperoncino.

After a movie, we needed a snack.  Bread butter and anchovy seemed appropriate.

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

In chessy news… zippo.  It was Candidates rest day.  It’s the half way point.  They’ll be back at it again today.

In Round 8 it’ll be:

Hikaru Nakamura – Fabiano Caruana
Ian Nepomniachtchi – Nijat Abasov
Praggnanandhaa R – Alireza Firouzja
Vidit Santosh Gujrathi – Gukesh D

I am a little conflicted about board 1, but I am decidedly not so about board 3.  GO PRAGG!

Meanwhile, white to move and mate in 4.

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

Click!

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

Ceterum censeo Firouzja delendum esse.

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ROME 24/4– Day 23: AT LONG LAST!

As the world turns, one expected the Roman sun to rise at 06:32.  It did.  One expects it to set at 19:50.

The Ave Maria Bell – 20:00.

A note about the Ave Maria not being rung.  I was working in my little kitchen last night with the window open and I heard a bell ringing at or near 20:00 and it wasn’t ringing the hour.  Rather, by the time it really caught my attention, it rang a short sequence of 3.  I must, tonight, pay attention.  It may be an Ave Maria Bell.  Wouldn’t that be great?   The confirmation would need to be made on 15 April when the time should change to 20:15.

The Parish Façade Report.

Anvedi, ao!

Before…

Well?   What do you think?

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

Meanwhile, last night I made Roman artichokes.  I include a cork for scale.

Mentuccia, parsley, garlic.

After giving them a little color, into the pot they go.

To help keep the steam in, a piece of “frying paper”, as it is here called.

They are not hard to make once you get past the prep.

A good shot of the perfect storm of street blocking morning chaos.

Hello!

I stopped for clams at my fishmonger today.  Tonight, The Great Roman™ will come to eat multiple spaghettis and clams preceded by raw fava beans along with pecorino cheese and white wine.

It was another great morning of errands and running into people.  Also, in a space of about 10 minutes I was hit up for money.  Always the same people.  Always the same response.  I never give money.  Period.  I’ll gladly buy someone something to eat, but I don’t give money.  It’s the money they are after, mostly.

Meanwhile, at Pippo’s stand… these.  What color in the morning sun!

Meanwhile, I have bad news.    Yesterday in Round 7 of the Candidates Tournament, alas, Gukesh was defeated by Alireza Firouzja. He is now no longer at the bottom of the standings. Ian Nepomniachtchi drew against Hikaru Nakamura who had about 20 moves of preparation. With the defeat of Gukesh, Nepo is again the sole leader. Fabiano Caruana is in third place. Today is a rest day. Hostilities resume on Saturday, 13 April.

Here’s a puzzle. White to move and obtain a winning position.   Note that the white knight and queen are under attack.

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

Click!

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

Ceterum censeo Firouzja delendum esse.

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ROME 24/3– Day 22: Artichokes

In Rome today the sun emerged from hiding at 06:34.  It will re-submerge at 19:49.

The Ave Maria Bell, you ask?   Why, 20:00, of course!  For a little while longer.

What a terrific morning it has been.  I am full of gratitude.

Lord, thank you for this day.

The Parish™ Façade report.

On the way out of church of the workers, standing in the truck across from the main doors, raised his arms skyward and said, “Ao! Guarda che bella!”

Speaking of “bella”, in the sacristy I spotted a RED vestment laid out for I know not what reason.   YOU READERS bought those. Today is St. Pope Leo I (+461) and tomorrow is Pope St. Julius I, otherwise a Paschaltide dies non Friday.  The Martyrology says that it is the Feast of St. Zeno of Verona, martyr.   Perhaps you’ve visited his church in Verona.

There is life without Verona walls, by the way.

Today had the most delightful morning.  Strolling up the Via del Arco, I saw an amazing sight.  The door to the tiny little chapel that pertains to the Monte di Pietà was OPEN!  Thirty years and more I haven’t seen that.    Inside there was a painting of Mary, Help of the Wretched, which is now inside The Parish™ church and much attended and venerated.

The painting of S.M. Succurre Miseris in the church.

In the little chapel this is a sort of replacement so there isn’t a blank spot.   Given that it is a Pietà it is a good image for this place.

However, through that door in the back – the guys there let me in to see – I found this, which is somewhat nobler and no doubt harder to hang.

Exiting the little chapel I ran into a nice young fellow from Newcastle who told me about TLM things going on in that region.

Rounding my way back from an ATM errand, I ran into a couple more people who recognized me, one from Dallas.  We had a nice chat.

Passing through the Campo de’ Fiori I stopped at a vegetable stand – not the usual – because they usually display in the morning some prepped artichokes.  I was determined that, tonight, I would make carciofi alla Romana!

As, we were talking about how to make them, along comes the Argentinian born proprietor of my chosen wateringhole on the Campo, where I generally meet up with people in town for a beverage before heading to supper.   When the veg stand guy saw us two to be friendly, of course the ribbing started: “Are you Argentinian too?   If you know this one, no artichokes for you!” “Will you sell them at double price?”  “I dunno…..”.  All good natured.  The bar owner is decidedly NOT a fan of one of his co-nationals.

Anyway, to the important stuff.   The nice lady prepped some carciofi for me.

I report on them tomorrow.

Jasmine Report.   No, not the Jesuit.  Nope, it has not yet blossomed.

I also bought freesia this morning from Pippo.  He gave me a great discount so I got two.

These blossoms, however, are great.   They’ve lasted a long time and are wide open.  I’ve discovered that, given some stretches of darkness, they open wide and last a long time.

I also bought freesia this morning from Pippo.  He gave me a great discount so I got two.

After the flowers, to the butcher for some beef for tonight.  It’ll be a nice supper.   As I paid for my purchase, the guy cranked up the volume on “The Final Countdown”.  I guess that’s for me, for I am now past the halfway mark in my Roman Sojourn.  *sigh*

Meanwhile, in chessy news, I am delighted to report that, yesterday at the Candidates tournament, Alireza Firouzja playing white was taken down by Vidit Gujrathi.  Before that, he lost to Hikaru. Here is a decisive endgame moment when F handed Hikaru the nails for his own coffin.

How satisfying.

Right now, Ian Nepomniachtchi and Gukesh D are tied for first with 4/6. Alireza is last with 1.5/6 right there with the lowest rated player in the field.

Meanwhile, black to move and mate in 4.

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

Try some wine by the traditional Benedictines of Le Barroux!

Ceterum censeo Firouzja delendum esse.

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ROME 24/3– Day 21: AO!

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

At 06:35 the sun lifted it’s blazing head over the Roman horizon… behind clouds.   It is supposed to clear up later in the day for the sunset at 19:48.

The Ave Maria is at 20:00.

Parish™ Façade Report.

This is getting exciting.   You can now see the inscriptions, including the plenary indulgence announcement over the doors.  I learned that the façade will be illuminated.  Ao!

Caption:  “AO!”

A visit to the Chiesa Nuova.

Last October it was full of scaffolding.

Look at that stupid monstrosity of an altar arrangement.  Happily, a few guys with pry bars and carts will be able to remove it swiftly when the day arrives.

A visit to St. Filippo Neri.

Then a visit to the chess guys at the P.za der Fico.

It’s a rough and ready crowd.  If you want to hear Romanaccio being spoken, this is your corner.

For your Roman lesson today, …

I introduce the readership to one of the marvels of Romanesco: ahó or simply ao.    You find ahò in other italians derived from something like a modo…. meh… who really knows?  It’s often used in greetings, like ciaò.  In Rome ao does that but about a million other things too.  It is used in countless contexts and, somehow, you know what it means.   It has a particular pronunciation in Rome as well and it is not to be trifled with.   Get not between a Roman and his ao.

Here’s an amusing illustrative video about the splendors of Roman ao.   If you know something about Italian, Roman in particular, and you have delicate sensibilities, you might be a little bruised by the end.  Romans are expressive in an impressively earthy elegance.

In chessy news, after the rest day, Candidates continued.  Pretty tense stuff.   Prag had Nepo on the ropes, but Nepo pulled out a draw with black.  The same Fabi with black against Vidit.  Meanwhile, Gukesh got a full point in a something 6 hour slug fest against lowest rated Abasov.  The real accomplishment was Hikaru’s, black, back and forth eventual defeat of Alirezja Firouzja, who made a single wrong move at the end and snatched defeat from the jaws perhaps of a draw which was already avoidable.   Hikaru’s defense was great and his opponent’s time struggle was decisive.  Therefore, Firouzja is exactly where he ought to be and stay: at the bottom of the field.  Hikaru, with a full point has his first win and moves up.  Nepo and Gukesh share the lead with 3.5/5.

Firouzja, ao! (= Ceterum censeo Firouzja delendum esse. )

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

Meanwhile, again… white to move and win.  From Emmanuel Lasker in 1917.  Gimme a winning position, not a mate, in 5.


1.Bd4 Bg3 2.Ba7 Bf4 3.Bb8 Be3 4.Bc7 Ba75.Bb6.
NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

After the rather heavy food over the last couple of days, yesterday, this was it.   Ao! (= Really good caprese)

This, my dear readers, is why I started the Black Vestment Project.  Thank you, btw, to the six chosen donors.

Ao! (= Look at this set.)  Two of the pieces match and there are holes worn into and through some parts.

Ao! (= this is too sad)

Anyway, the problem is now on the road to remedy!  Gammarelli has the order for 7 new black sets in wonderful fabric with gold trim.   We are doing them in the more Roman, Roman style, with straight stoles, higher cross on the maniple and no cross on the chalice veil.

 

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Instructive blog post about how fasting before liturgical changed over time.

At the blog A Catholic Life there is an interesting post, with a graphic, that explains how, over the years, fasting changed for liturgical vigils.

You can draw your own conclusions, but I think it is telling.

It is well worth the time to visit that blog and read that post.   He has not only the graphic, below (thanks in advance, well done), but definitions of terms and explanations which you should see.  Quite instructive.

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ROME 24/3– Day 20: Jasmine Report (no, not the Jesuit)

In Rome the sun rose at 06:37 and it will set at 19:47.

The Ave Maria should ring at 20:00.

Today is a 4th class feria, so I celebrated a Votive Mass of the Holy Angels and offered it for my monthly donors.  You are deeply appreciated.

Last night I met up with a distinguished Catholic writer and commentator who would be instantly recognized by most of you.  We had a nice supper and a great chat, including about the new document from the CDF DDF.  12K words, 161 notes.

On a more pleasant subject, I had carbonara.  The consistency was perfect, though there was perhaps a bit too much of the sauce.

Saltimbocca.

On the way home I noticed that the light at this Madonnella had been fixed.    Nice for the Annunciation.

There were once thousands of these Maddonelle in Rome, and they were cared for by the people in that street or neighborhood.  There are still about 500 left.  Some are in less than perfect repair.  Others are very well tended.   I find them touching.  When I spot one, it is a reminder to say a quick prayer.  I will often ask Mary to put her protective mantle over me, or someone I think of in that moment, or someone who has asked for my prayers.  More than once a day, when I am out and around, I say a prayer for my benefactors, in particular these days all those who contributed so that I could be here again for a while and refresh my batteries.

The Parish™ façad report… progress.  It is going to be so beautiful.  I can hardly wait.

In the market, this is barba di frate … friar’s beard.  I’ll make it one day soon.   Not to be confused with frariarelli, of course.

I gave you an Ivy Report.  This is a JASMINE Report (and I don’t mean a certain Jesuit).

I enjoy the wonderful fragrance of the jasmine, especially in the evening as things cool down.   It will bloom pretty soon.

Meanwhile…

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

Meanwhile, again… white to move.  Mate in 3.

Use FATHERZ10 at checkout

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

In chessy news, … nope.  Well, yes, I guess.  The Candidates had a rest day, but there was a tournament in Menorca and Arjun Erigaisi emerged on top.  So, he climbs in the live ratings list a couple spots.  And there’s now yet another 12 year old grandmaster.   *sigh*  Today I will be pulling for Hikaru against Firouzja.

Ceterum censeo Firouzja delendum esse.

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

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“…yea thou art now Thy Maker’s maker,…”

Annunciation by John Donne (+1631):

Salvation to all that will is nigh;
That All, which always is all everywhere,
Which cannot sin, and yet all sins must bear,
Which cannot die, yet cannot choose but die,
Lo, faithful virgin, yields Himself to lie
In prison, in thy womb; and though He there
Can take no sin, nor thou give, yet He will wear,
Taken from thence, flesh, which death’s force may try.
Ere by the spheres time was created, thou
Wast in His mind, who is thy Son and Brother;
Whom thou conceivst, conceived; yea thou art now
Thy Maker’s maker, and thy Father’s mother;
Thou hast light in dark, and shutst in little room,
Immensity cloistered in thy dear womb.

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ROME 24/3– Days 18 & 19: Octave of Easter and Annunciation

The sun, which will not visibly eclipsed in totality from Rome, rose at 06:39 and it will set at 19:46.

The Ave Maria should ring at 20:00

Speaking of the Ave Maria, today we celebrate the Feast of the Annunciation, deferred because of Holy Week and the Octave of Easter.  This commemorates the very moment that the Eternal Word took our humanity into an indestructible bond with His divinity, thanks to Mary’s fiat.

Welcome registrant:

CMD

Thanks to MF for the donation via Zelle rather than Paypal.
Thanks also to AN for switching from Continue to Zelle.

I was asked by a reader about how my friend here in Rome Giancarlo is doing.

Frankly, he is not doing well at all.  He is dealing with dialysis and other issues. Members of the Archconfraternity at The Parish™ have started a novena of prayers for him.  It is underway, but you can join now.  Bl. Pius IX was himself a member of the Archconfraternity!

The prayer, as sent to me with a rendering in English.

Original Translation
Sacratissimo Cuore di Gesù, esaudisci la nostra supplica e concedi la canonizzazione del Beato Pio IX Tuo servo che Ti consacrò la Chiesa Universale.

3 Gloria al Padre

O Maria concepita senza peccato, prega per noi che ricorriamo a te ed esaudisci le nostre preghiere, affinché il Beato Pio IX Tuo devotissimo figlio che Ti proclamò Immacolata, venga elevato alla gloria degli altari come Santo.

3 Ave Maria

San Giuseppe, castissimo sposo della Vergine Maria, esaudisci le nostre preghiere affinché il Beato Pio IX Tuo servo, che Ti proclamò Patrono della Chiesa Universale, sia elevato alla gloria degli altari come Santo.

3 Padre Nostro

Sacro Cuore di Gesù, Vergine Maria Immacolata nostra speranza, san Giuseppe esaudite le nostre preghiere, di vedere elevato alla gloria degli altari come Santo il Beato Pio IX Papa e per i suoi meriti ed intercessione concedeteci la grazia che continuamente imploriamo (la guarigione di Giancarlo).

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, grant our supplication and grant the canonization of Blessed Pius IX, your servant who consecrated the Universal Church to you.

3 Glory be to the Father

O Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to you and answer our prayers, so that Blessed Pius IX, your most devoted son who proclaimed you Immaculate, may be raised to the glory of the altars as a Saint.

3 Hail Marys

Saint Joseph, most chaste husband of the Virgin Mary, grant our prayers so that Blessed Pius IX, your servant, who proclaimed you Patron of the Universal Church, may be raised to the glory of the altars as a Saint.

3 Our Fathers

Sacred Heart of Jesus, Virgin Mary Immaculate our hope, Saint Joseph answer our prayers, to see Blessed Pius IX Pope raised to the glory of the altars as a Saint and for his merits and intercession grant us the grace that we continually implore (the healing of Giancarlo ).

Amen.

Some Sunday shots.

The Solemn Mass crew from yesterday, unprompted, went back into the sanctuary after the recessional and said their prayers.  There is a new one… try to figure out which.

My view for a while.  I was parked next to the Paschal candle, which somewhat obscures me view.

At the top, now getting the burn, is a peacock.   In ancient and more modern (e.g., Renaissance) art, peacocks represent immortality because it had been thought that the flesh of the peacock did not decay.   Remember that when you are looking at paintings with Christian themes.   There might be a peacock hanging around for no apparent reason.

The “ivy” report.  Apparently it is really Virginia Creeper.

Last night’s view on the way to supper with friends whom I ran into at the Campo enjoying peacocktails at a favored watering hole.  Borromini never disappoints.

Neither did this fiorentina which the three of us devoured entirely.

Lovely.

Meanwhile…

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

Meanwhile, again… white to move.  Mate in…


1. Qxh5+ Kg7 2. Rfxg6+ fxg6 3. Qxg6+ Kh8 4. Rh5+ Rh7 5. Rxh7#

Use FATHERZ10 at checkout

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

In chessy news, I am just catching up with yesterday’s Candidates results even now.   I’m sure you are as anxious as I am to know what happened.   Looking… looking… ah… Nepo beat Vidit to take the lead.  Fabi and Gukesh drew. Hikaru and Prag drew.  Abasov (the lowest ranked in the field) drew with Firouzja, which is fine with me.   The fewer points for Firouzja, the better.   I look forward to reviewing Nepomniachtchi v. Vidit. It was a Berlin.

Are you moving?  Please remember Realestate For Life!  They put you in touch with a realtor who will give some of the fee to a pro-life group.

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Your Sunday Sermon Notes: Low Sunday, Divine Mercy Sunday, Quasimodo Sunday, Thomas Sunday, Sunday “in albis depositis” 2024

Too many people today are without good, strong preaching, to the detriment of all. Share the good stuff.

Was there a GOOD point made in the sermon you heard at your Mass of obligation for Low Sunday, 2nd of Easter?

Tell about attendance especially for the Traditional Latin Mass.  I hear that it is growing.  Of COURSE.

Any local changes or (hopefully good) news?

A taste of my thoughts from the other place: HERE

[…]

This is where I venture into informed speculation.  Firstly, Thomas was not with the other Apostles on that first Easter Sunday when Christ breathed on them.  However, the breathing was essential and tied to the Holy Spirit.  Next, consider the meanings of “hand” in Greek, including the wrist. Also, Christ said “thrust” (rather like a spear).  Moreover, the wound from the lance remained in Christ and therefore remained all the way into His Heart.

[…]

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On Divine Mercy Sunday a sobering thought from a Pope about that terrible day

“Divine Mercy! Rah, rah, rah!”   Right?

Right.   However…

We have come to Low Sunday, Dominica in albis, the Octave of Easter.  I reviewed something of what Fathers of the Church had to say about our Gospel passage on this famous Sunday: John 20:19-31.

Pope St. Gregory the Great (+604) preached on this very passage in the Basilica of St. John Lateran on the 1st Sunday after Easter.  In other words, liturgically, today.

Here is the very end of his sermon, which sheds a needed light on the theme of “divine mercy”.

Thus Gregory the Great:

Consider again, beloved brethren, this important truth, and carefully endeavour to be preserved from the eternal perdition.

These Easter-days are celebrated with great pomp and magnificence; yet our duty is to make ourselves worthy of arriving at the eternal Festivals.

You endeavour to be present at these feastdays, which pass and disappear; try, then, your utmost to be one day present, all together, at the never-ending celebration in heaven. What would it profit you to assist at our festivals now, were you never to be admitted to the festivities of the angels in heaven?

Our present feast-days are only the shadow of those we are expecting, and, though year after year we are celebrating them, we are longing for those never-ending days in the kingdom of God. Renew in your hearts the desire of the eternal festivities by the celebration of the annual earthly festivals.

Let the happiness granted to us in the present time penetrate us in such a way that we continue sighing for the eternal happiness prepared for us in heaven, and ardently desired by us on earth. Prepare yourselves for that eternal rest by amending your lives and practising virtue and holiness. Never forget that He Who in His Resurrection was meekness itself, will be terrible when coming to judge the world.

On this awful day He will appear surrounded by Angels, Archangels, Thrones, Principalities and Powers.

On that day heaven and earth and all the elements, being the ministers of His wrath, will be in a general conflagration.

May this terrible Judge be ever present to the eyes of your mind, that, penetrated by a salutary fear of His severe judgment, that is to be held, you may confidently expect His corning.

Let us fear now, that we may be without fear then, and this fear will help us to avoid sin and work out our salvation. For I tell you that the more we are now afraid to rouse the anger of our Judge against us, the greater will be our confidence when we appear before Him at the end of the world.

Let us strive in our liturgical celebrations both to anticipate the beauty of the heavenly liturgy before the throne of God, and also to encounter within those sacred mysteries the mystery which is the remedy for our fear of death.

Isn’t this in part the problem in the tension between the Novus Ordo and the Vetus Ordo?   The Novus Ordo tends to stress eschatological joy.  There is nothing wrong with that.  However, the Vetus Ordo also stresses eschatological joy, but it also tells you how to obtain it.  That means all of those references to sin, guilt, penance, propitiation that were stripped out of the Novus Ordo prayers.   There is no tension between the Novus Ordo and Vetus Ordo regarding a strong, hopeful view of participation in the joy of Heaven.   They both do.

If our liturgical worship does not prepare us truly for the moment in which we come to the Judge, then our liturgical worship has not provided what we truly need.  How Mass is celebrated is important.  But it isn’t only the outward signs and gestures, style of celebration, language, posture, vestments, art, architecture.  Those are important.  So are the texts themselves.   They are, in the long run, critically important.

Lastly, GO TO CONFESSION.

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ROME 24/3– Day 17: Easter Saturday “in albis” (& Fr. Z’s Kitchen)

Hello sun at 06:42 and g’bye at 19:44.

Ave Maria, still at 20:00.

It is Saturday in albis.   It is amazing how the Church wove the texts and readings of Holy Mass together over the Octave.

Today, in the ancient Church, would have been the last day for the newly baptized infantes to be wearing their white baptismal garb.  Tomorrow the white would be put off, albis depositis, according to their new status in the Church.

That’s today and tomorrow, about which I will have more to say alibi.

However, yesterday, at my regular veggie stand, I spotted fine puntarelle, which I relish.   And to make them, you have to make your relish, the dressing, in the Roman way.

First, garlic. Mince and give it a dash of salt.  Then with the flat of your knife press and smash, back and forth.  The salt helps to grind down the garlic.

This releases more of the garlicky essence for more immediate and cold distribution.

Into a bowl with anchovies and white wine vinegar and oil.  You want to make an emulsion.

Not having a little whizzer machine handy, I resorted to the back of a spoon to mash it all up.  Eventually it smoothed out, sort of.

Mix through your beautiful fresh crunchy puntarelle!

Here’s a little chapel in a nearby church where St. Philip Neri started his Oratory, the Spada family footed the bill for this.  Whew.  You can’t get tired of this.   Yes, that’s stone.

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.Who wants to do some Latin for fun?  Animi caussa?

And if you are really ambitious.   I enjoy reading these old stones and thinking about the people who, in their great love, did so much, left so much for posterity.

Meanwhile, white to move and mate in 3.  An easy one today.  That black queen suggests how you must proceed.   Go ahead, if you haven’t been trying these.  It’s not that difficult.

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

Click!

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

In chessy news, the Candidates Tournament has begun in Toronto!   Eight players are duking it out.  I am a a little less than happy that the Candidate is in Toronto when I am in Central European Time. I can only watch coverage of the openings and then get some rack time. In the mornings I avoid anything that can spoil my review of the day and find a video that gives a recap of the previous day’s action. This morning was delighted that a few games had winners, that they weren’t all draws. I was especially glad that two-time Candidates winner Nepo defeated Alireza Firouzja, who deserves all the losses he can give up.

I don’t have the energy to follow the women’s side of the Candidates, but Tan Zhongyi has two wins so far. Back to the “open” side (basically the men), with black Vidit Gujrathi pretty much blew 2nd seed Hikaru Nakamura off the board. It’s the first classical game loss for Nakamura since the 2022 Madrid Candidates.

Meanwhile, in honor of the Candidates tournament, I tried these animi caussa.  They would be nice with coffee…. ehem.   Buy some coffee… help the Carmelites build.

Ceterum censeo Alirezam delendum esse.

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ROME 24/3– Day 16: Easter Friday (& Fr. Z’s Kitchen)

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

Sunrise today was at 06:44 and sunset will be at 19:43.

The Ave Maria Bell is scheduled for 20:00

It is the Feast of St. Irene, virgin and martyr (+304)

Today is a 1st Friday and Friday in the Octave of Easter. Being a 1st Friday should prompt you to think about GOING TO CONFESSION.

Yesterday was spent in part visiting some small churches and taking in the beautiful sunlight on a warm but not hot day: perfect.

A view down the street toward the Ponte Sisto and Trastevere.  Lots of people out walking.

It felt like a chickeny day, so I made chicken last night.   A view of the butcher case.   The inclusion of a head lets you know what sort of chicken it is.  What kind of chicken is it, you ask?   Dead, so far as I can tell.   Other than that, not a clue.   They do this in France, too, to guarantee that that Bresse chicken is the real deal and not some counterfeit interloping poseur.

I, however, opted for one of these small spatchcocked birds that had some seasoning already.

A view of the day’s last light on the dome of Sant’Andrea della Valle on my way home.  All the domes in Rome are turning dark.

Let’s do some prep.   First, some color/flavor for the veg with the bird.

The same for the onion.

Meanwhile, which drink is mine?

After browning the bird a bit, reassemble.  I’ve added rosemary and a couple of cloves of garlic, smashed.  A slosh of wine, Trebbiano, and into the oven.

The just out of the oven.

Supper was half of this.  Now I have great leftovers either for another, similar plate or perhaps for soup.  Decisions decisions.

Dessert: taleggio.

Meanwhile, white to move and mate in 4.  Can you name any of the techniques used to  obtain this victory?

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

 CLICK!

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

In chessy news, the Candidates Tournament has begun in Toronto!   Eight players are duking it out.  Yesterday saw quite a few draws, all of the men and all but one for the women’s side.  You all know my position, of course.  Ceterum censeo Firouzja delendum esse.

Give support to the good Benedictines in Norcia.   I found out that they operate on the solar calendar and clock for their days.   See my post the other day about the solar clocks in Rome.

UPDATE: Finally, extreme thanks to DM for a lovely donation for my time in Rome. I bought flowers for the apartment today without the slightest twinge of concern.

Here are the new resident blooms.

The alstroemeria haven’t fully opened yet. They should be good for more than a week if tended well.

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FATHERS! Enlightening article at CWR – Civil Suits by Catholic Priests: A Status Report by Michael Mazza

Reverend and Dear Fathers…

Here is a link to an article that was just released late yesterday on the website of The Catholic World Report.

Civil Suits by Catholic Priests: A Status Report by Michael Mazza

HERE

Michael Mazza is both a civil lawyer and a canon lawyer (a successful one, too).

The article highlights both the level of frustration (and even desperation) that exists among priests and lay faithful regarding accusations and the way they are handled AND how pursuing a path of civil litigation has its own hazards. This is an important and timely topic, so please feel free to circulate.

Posted in Cancelled Priests, Priests and Priesthood | Tagged ,
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Annuntio vobis gaudium magnum!

From a reader…

Dear Father Z,
I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart and soul for your constant exhortations to “Go To Confession.” It has taken me quite a while (years) to step up to the confessional but with the help of the Holy Spirit and your prayers, I finally did the deed on Holy Saturday. It has been an unbelievable and (hopefully, with prayers) life-changing blessing. Please keep up your so-very-necessary apostolate. You are in my special prayers, as is the priest who heard my confession.
With thanksgiving for Christ’s mercy and forgiveness,

Please, merciful God, let this reckoned against my Judgment, which could be at anytime according to Thy will.

If this blog has accomplished nothing else, I thank Christ the High Priest, Mary the Refuge of Sinners, and Joseph, Patron of the Church for the chance to bring people back to the confessional.

My Jesus, mercy.

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ROME 24/3– Day 15: Easter Thursday

The Parish™

6 July 2023

4 April 2024

This beautiful sunny yet cool Roman day started by the sun’s rising at 06:45 and it will end at 19:42.

The Ave Maria (which you know all about now) is at 20:00

It is the feast of St. Isidore, Bishop and Doctor as well as that of St. Francisco Marto (+1919) the apparition seer of Fatima.

I will say Holy Mass today for my Roman Sojourn donors.

Also, thank you to ML for shifting from “Continue” to Zelle.  And a huge thanks to

I had a note from a priest friend who has people help to keep stats on certain feasts.  He wrote that  they heard 2100+ confessions during Passiontide, 727 confessions in 10 hrs on Good Friday, and 1,400+ on the Easter vigil.

Fathers!  If you have a parish, and you are not preaching about morals, sin and the Sacrament of Penance, if you are not scheduling reasonable, accessible, adequate hours for confessions – which will increase when people know and trust that you will be hearing – then you are probably going to go to Hell.

That said, here’s a lovely little vehicle, a Fiat 500L, probably late 60’s with a roaring 18HP!

On the way home from shopping, down the wonderful V. dei Cappellari.

Please remember me when shopping online and use my affiliate links.  US HERE – UK HERE  WHY?  This helps to pay for health insurance (massively hiked for this new year of surprises), utilities, groceries, etc..  At no extra cost, you provide help for which I am grateful.

Meanwhile, black to move and mate in 3.

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

 CLICK!

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

In chessy news, TODAY beginneth the Candidates Tournament in Toronto!  This is an eight-player double round-robin clash. Eight grandmasters (including one whom I hope loses in with significant defeats) will compete to play against present World Champ Ding Liren, who defeated Ian Nepomniachtchi when Magnus wouldn’t defend his title.   This should be good watchin’!

My prediction: Fabiano Caruana will prevail.  It’s either he or Hikaru Nakamura.   Nepo is not to be ruled out as a spoiler, but the way Fabiano has been playing, and Hikaru… whew.

Ceterum censeo Alirezam delendum esse.

Give the sisters some attention!

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ASK FATHER: Can we eat meat on Friday in the Octave of Easter?

We are now in the Easter Octave – Happy Easter! Let’s get out in front of this before the calendar clicks over to Friday.

First, allow me to post a shot of last night’s (Wednesday’s) repast.

The beef is so good here in Rome, where I write, at least from the butcher I use at the Campo de’ Fiori.  It tastes like I remember beef used to taste.  And probably a little cheaper than in my usual US grocery.  I managed a pretty much perfect cottura this time, with an excellent Maillard reaction and rare center.  The veg are mushrooms and cicoria in padella with garlic and hot pepper.

I could eat this again tonight, Thursday.  I could eat this again on Friday.  On this Friday, that is.

From a reader…

QUAERITUR:

My wife and I recently returned to the traditional Friday abstinence from meat year round.

Traditionally, would the Friday abstinence from meat also apply during Fridays of the whole Easter season?

What about just the octave?

Congratulations for wanting to adhere to the traditional practices.  Kudos.

You’ve asked a good question.

Here is canon 1251:

Can. 1251 Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays, unless a solemnity should fall on a Friday. Abstinence and fasting are to be observed on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

From the General Norms for Liturgical Year and Calendar, 24

24. The first eight days of Easter Time constitute the Octave of Easter and are celebrated as Solemnities of the Lord.

The days of the Octave of Easter are celebrated as Solemnities (in the Novus Ordo calendar).    Therefore, there is no obligation for Catholics for the Friday abstinence on this coming Friday.

Note well that the other Fridays of Eastertide are not Solemnities.  The relief from abstinence applies only to the Friday in the Octave of Easter.

BTW… this does not apply to the Octave of Christmas, for those days of that Octave are not counted as “Solemnities” as are those of the Easter Octave.

This is how the 1983 Code of Canon Law handles Friday in the Octave of Easter, and this applies also to those who prefer the Extraordinary Form (which did not have “Solemnities”).

As far as other Fridays are concerned, outside the Octave of Easter or some other Solemnity, you can ask your parish priest to dispense you or commute your act of penance.

Can. 1245 Without prejudice to the right of diocesan bishops mentioned in can. 87, for a just cause and according to the prescripts of the diocesan bishop, a pastor [parish priest] can grant in individual cases a dispensation from the obligation of observing a feast day or a day of penance or can grant a commutation of the obligation into other pious works. A superior of a religious institute or society of apostolic life, if they are clerical and of pontifical right, can also do this in regard to his own subjects and others living in the house day and night.

Abstinence from meat has good reasoning behind it. For some, however, abstinence from other things can be of great spiritual effect.

Certainly you would never abstain from reading this blog… or from ordering…

 

Posted in "How To..." - Practical Notes, ASK FATHER Question Box, Classic Posts | Tagged , , ,
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4 April – St. Isidore of Seville, the Internet Prayer and You

I often forget to pray before using the internet. I sometimes fail in charity when using the internet.

This tool of social communication and research and entertainment has amazing upsides, but it also has spiritually deadly perils. We all should be very careful in how we use it – and through it – use each other, “use” in the finer sense of “treat” each other.

Today is the feast of St. Isidore of Seville, Bishop and Doctor (+4 April 636).

He is not to be confused with St. Isidore the Farmer.

St. Isidore defended the faith against the Arian heresy, which was still around.

It is amazing how tenacious heresy can be.  It still is around.

Some years ago – quiet a few years, now that I think about it, in the late 90’s when Compuserve was still the thing – there was chat about having St. Isidore proposed as the patron saint of the internet. He has NOT, however, officially been named such. Keep that in mind.

I was asked to write a prayer people could recite before using the internet. I wrote the prayer in Latin and submitted it, with a translation into English, to a bishop who gave it his approval.

This prayer is now all over the same internet, both with and without attribution.

You will want to know why some people proposed St. Isidore for this role.

St. Isidore’s most notable work, the Etymologiae, us a massive encyclopedic work of 448 chapters in 20 volumes indexing just about everything people thought it was important to know at the time, rather like a primitive database.  I think that’s the connection.

You can, of course, pray to any saint in this matter, and nothing official about any patron for the internet has been handed down from the Congregation Dicastery for the Causes of Saints (which is the competent dicastery of the Holy See in those matters).

Bottom line: people wanted a prayer for St. Isidore, and I wrote one. You should feel free to change the name to whatever saint you prefer. Others have proposed St. Maximilian Kolbe (+1941), St. Bernadine of Siena (+1444), St. Rita of Cascia (+1457), and the Archangel Gabriel (still around).

I am happy for people to use this prayer. I ask that you give attribution if you repost.

To see all the versions of the prayer which are now available, go

HERE

If you can offer a new translation with the title (and audio recording by a native speaker) into a language missing from those I’ve archived, please send it. To email me, click HERE.

I would also like a video of the prayer in ASL, American Sign Language.

Meanwhile, here is the English.

A prayer before logging onto the internet:

Almighty and eternal God, who created us in Thine image and bade us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful, especially in the divine person of Thine Only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant, we beseech Thee, that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, Bishop and Doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Christ our Lord.   Amen.

Finally, I’m still waiting for an improved version in Klingon.

Posted in Classic Posts, Linking Back, Saints: Stories & Symbols | Tagged ,
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ROME 24/3– Day 13 & 14: Easter Tuesday and Wednesday – QUAERITUR: The Ave Maria Bell Explained… even too much

Today, 3 April, Easter Wednesday, at 6:47 the sun rose over the Eternal City. The sunlight day will begin to end at 19:40.

I got a little screwed up with my days in posting, so this is a sort of leap-date.

The Ave Maria Bell … or as one reader wrote to ask:

“What the heck is the ‘Ave Maria Bell’ and why do you post about it if nobody does it?”

The Ave Maria Bell is a relic of time calculation from when accurate clocks were not simply everywhere. Also, the clocks were different than now.  The Ave Maria sounded a single bell struck 3 times, then 4 times, 5 times, and then 1 time.

The “Ave Maria” indicates the change of the religious day from day to night.   It was a way of calculating the day using a 6-hour clock that the Church developed in the 13th c.. the 6-hour dominated until Napoleon imposed the 12-hour clock (which predominates today).  If, when walking about in Rome and if you are in the know, you will spot old 6-hour day clocks.  For example, at the interesting church in Trastevere, Santa Maria del Orto, the “university church”, there is a 6-hour clock in the façade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an interesting church.  It was for the “universities” or professional associations especially having to do with food because of its location near the bank of the Tiber where there were wharves.   There were 13 Università, including the Fruttaroli (like the vegetable vendors in Campo de’ Fiori), the Pollaroli (chicken guys) and the Vermicellari (pasta makers).   Santa Maria del Orto is also now the church for the Japanese in Rome.

A quick digression.  The other day I noticed that scaffolding has been taken down in the Via Pollarola where there is an exceptionally mediocre restaurant of the same name and, across the way, a very good place which is one of my favorites these days, Elle Effe.  Anyway, in Chicken Vendor Street, there is an inscription which was hard to see until again recently.

There is  still a butcher shop nearby that primarily advertises chicken, though they have everything.  Last year I got a great rabbit there for supper with The Great Roman™.  But I digress.

The Collegio Romano has a six-hour clock, too.  The most visible is in the bell tower of the Quirinal Palace.  They are all over Rome, but you have to pay attention and sometimes they are in inner courtyards or in sacristies.

The Ave Maria is rung in the ballpark of half an hour after sunset. If the Ave Maria is rung at 20:00, as it is from 2-15 April (in truth it’s 19:00, but “ora legale… daylight savings”) and therefore is today, then 19:00 (really 18:00) is 23rd hour of the religious day and 21:00 (really 20:00) is the 1st hour of the next day.  This older calculation of the day’s hours meant that, as the year progressed the length of “an hour” changed.

In Italian there are a couple of phrases that still ring with ancient usage of the Ave Maria.  For example, “portare il cappello sulle ventritre… wear your hat at the 23rd (hour)” means to bring the brim of your cap down to shield your eyes from the light of the low sun.  The day divided in 4 blocks of 6 shifting-length hours is represented in a phrase, “la merenda a vent’un ore… a snack at 21 hours”.  In the summer working day are very long.  There would be for laborers a mid-afternoon snack, at “21 hours” which would be roughly between 4 and 5 in the afternoon.  This would carry you through to the end of the work day.  In fact, it was the custom when I was on a work schedule in Rome to have a snack at about 4-4:30 PM, maybe after a post-lunch nap, before heading back to work in the Curia office until 7-7:30 PM (and the non-ringing Ave Maria Bell).

In the Roman Curia, Cardinals and other officials would still receive people in audience for the hour after the Ave Maria Bell rang. An hour after the Ave Maria, a single bell would toll, thus ending all business for the day, since it was the first hour of “night”. When there were large religious communities in Roman churches and chapters of canons, Vespers would be sung an hour before the Ave Maria Bell. Obviously daylight savings screws this up.

Finally, another relic of the six-hour clock is the recitation of the Angelus, now Regina Caeli, at 0600, 1200, and 1800.  Get it?

Thus, the Roman Ave Maria Bell.  More than you ever wanted to know.

Why do I post about it?  I want it back.  Also, I admire that the Roman Curia calendar (of which I post pics when in Rome, still provides this precious item of information connecting us to our forebears.

It wasn’t all that long ago that time was calculated quite a different way, more connected to the rhythm of the seasons, the coming and going of the sun, the time for work in the open and the time for rest, the time for prayer to punctuate the whole rounding of the hours.  Even as I typed those words the bell in the campanile across from my window chimed the 3/4 hour with three double chimes on two differently pitched bells and then the hour with another.   In my lodging back over the pond, I have a clock that chimes the naval bells, in their cycle of 4 rings of pairs of chimes.  My phone is set to play Evening Colors at sunset, as well as the Angelus/Regina caeli as recorded at The Parish™.

Tempus fugit, friends.  Memento mori.

GO TO CONFESSION.

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HEY!
ni**********@fuse.net – My thank you note was kicked back. This email doesn’t exist anymore.  Can I have an update?

Speaking of the hour of the sunrise this morning… here we go!

Out in the early hours.  I couldn’t resist.  I posted a still of this same guy a couple days back.

There will be pontifical baptism at The Parish™ and confirmation in the evening.  Item’s are being prepared.

A visit to the Sacred Heart this morning to ask healing for an ear issue.

One of the fruttaroli stands (and now you know a little more about them helps with preparation of Roman-style artichokes.  Tomorrow I may get some and try my hand, if they also have mentuccia.  Otherwise, I might have to wait until I see The Great Roman™ to get some.

On my way home from the stands, butcher, and bakery.

As I write, it is time for la merenda a vent’uno.

Speaking of coffee…

Black to move and mate in 3.

NB: I’ll hold comments with solutions ’till the next day so there won’t be “spoilers” for others.

 CLICK!

I am now a chess.com affiliate.   So, click and join!   Maybe we can build a fun and active Catholic Chess Club within Chess.com.

Posted in ASK FATHER Question Box, GO TO CONFESSION, Just Too Cool, SESSIUNCULA | Tagged ,
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