PRAYERCAzT 21: Passion of St. Matthew (Palm Sunday – 1962 Missale Romanum)

Welcome to another installment of What Does the Prayer Really Sound Like? 

Today we will hear the Passion of St. Matthew, to be sung on Palm Sunday using the 1962 Missale Romanum.   We hear it sung according to the traditional passion tone from the book called the Passionale

The Passionale is often divided into three books for each of the three parts, the voice for the words spoken by Christ (Christus), the voice of the narrator (Chronista), and all the voices of speakers in the Gospel narrative other than Christ (Synagoga).  The three parts are sung in different registers to differentiate them more easily.  In this recording I sing all three parts.

Often if a Passionale or set of Passionalia are available, they are older editions and some adaptations must be made for the 1962 Missale Romanum.  The older editions have parts that were removed at the time of the reform of Holy Week by Pope Pius XII.

However, at the end I include the very last section of the Passion as it was sung before the reforms of Pius XII.  This part is not to be done in the 1962 Missale.  However, it is a beautiful tone and I include it here, lest it be forgotten.  Perhaps there would be a way in which this tone could be recaptured for the last part of the gospel sung after the moment of silence for the death of the Lord.


http://www.wdtprs.com/prayercazt/080311_passion_matthew_palm.mp3

If priests who are learning to say the older form of Holy Mass can get these prayers in their ears, they will be able to pray them with more confidence. So, priests are my very first concern. 

However, these audio projects can be of great help to lay people who attend Holy Mass in the Traditional, or extraordinary form: by listening to them ahead of time, and becoming familiar with the sound of the before attending Mass, they will be more receptive to the content of the prayers and be aided in their full, conscious and active participation.

My pronunciation of Latin is going to betray something of my nationality, of course. Men who have as their mother tongue something other than English will sound a little different.  However, we are told that the standard for the pronunciation of Latin in church is the way it is spoken in Rome.  Since I have spent a lot of time in Rome, you can be pretty sure my accent will not be too far off the mark.

If this was useful to you, let your priest friends know this resource is available.  And kindly make a little donation using the donation button on the left side bar of the blog or or by clicking here.  This is a labor of love, but those donations really help.  And don’t forget to check out the PODCAzTs!

Pray for me, listen carefully, and practice practice practice.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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9 Responses to PRAYERCAzT 21: Passion of St. Matthew (Palm Sunday – 1962 Missale Romanum)

  1. When I attended Holy Week at an SSPX church in 2006, the deacon still
    sang the last section of the Passion in this old style. I guess the ICRSP does the same thing.

  2. fr.franklyn mcafee says:

    when I was practicing the Passion with others for our parish celebration of Palm Sunday (usus antiquior)I used a copy of the Passion in chant published by the Vatican.The text (meant for the OF)was much longer but I noticed that some words were different.They omit the word”Vah!” Is that word in the Greek;I cannot find it in the English.

  3. Joshua says:

    Mr. Palad, when I went to the sppx they did not include it. They followed the ’62 strictly. I would ask, did they also chant the first 31 verses that had been cut out?

    Fr. McAfee: isn’t the scripture for the OF based on a different Latin edition (Nova Vulgata?). I know there were slight differences between St. Agnes’ parish recording of St. Mark’s account and the 1926 music I have.

    I believe that the longer form for the OF added back 21 verses that had been cut at the beginning (out of 35 that had been cut), and the 6 verses at the end. At least those six at the end could be restored for the NO; that would be nice.

  4. Joshua says:

    Mr. Palad, when I went to the sppx they did not include it. They followed the ’62 strictly. I would ask, did they also chant the first 31 verses that had been cut out?

    Fr. McAfee: isn’t the scripture for the OF based on a different Latin edition (Nova Vulgata?). I know there were slight differences between St. Agnes’ parish recording of St. Mark’s account and the 1926 music I have.

    I believe that the longer form for the OF added back 21 verses that had been cut at the beginning (out of 35 that had been cut), and the 6 verses at the end. At least those six at the end could be restored for the NO; that would be nice.

  5. Dove says:

    Fr. Z, I listened to your podcast and found it very beautiful. What a service you a providing to all of us. I doubt that many of us will hear anything like it. It was a pleasure for me also because a group of us studied ecclesiastical Latin all last year (using Collins text), and I found that I could understand the Latin of the Passion as you sang it. A very moving experience.

  6. Antonius says:

    At the Oratory in Toronto for the Ordinary Forma on Palm Sunday the Passion is sung in latin by three priests with the choir responding with Lassus synagoga parts. On Good Friday it is sung in English…both coming after the Gradual which the choir sings in SATB–Anerio’s Christus Factus Est. For both they use the ending which Father Z added. It is the most moving and spiritual place to be during Holy Week in Toronto. I can’t believe that the end and its melodius spirituality was cut in 1962–it makes no sense to me.

  7. Ken says:

    How do your parishes handle the Passion of Saint Matthew on Palm Sunday in the traditional Latin Mass? Is it read by the priest or sung by deacons in Latin and re-read afterward in the vernacular, or does everyone by now know the story and/or has a vernacular translation to follow along with the Latin?

  8. Le Renard says:

    What happened to PrayerCazt 19 & 20?

    We jumped straight to 21.

  9. Le Renard says:

    Fr: U Need to tag Prayercazt 19 & 20 with the Category “PRAYERCAzT: What Does The (Latin) Prayer Really Sound L”