The Feeder Feed: Who is this? Baeolophus bicolor!

I think I have a new visitor at the feeder.Twitter

I saw him once, yesterday.

Another view.

This is Tufted Titmouse!  Baeolophus bicolor.

He pecks at seeds like a chickadee or jay.

YIPPEE!

Didn’t get along with the Grosbeak.

Note the little tuft on the head.

Tufted Titmouse.

Mystery solved.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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19 Responses to The Feeder Feed: Who is this? Baeolophus bicolor!

  1. lucy says:

    Hutton’s Vereo – but what is it doing in Minnesota? Perhaps that’s not it.

  2. I think you may have a young Tufted Titmouse!

  3. Legisperitus says:

    I believe Lynne is right. Compare the one at http://vickiehenderson.blogspot.com/2009/06/tufted-titmouse-fun.html

  4. lucy says:

    Lynne must be correct, looks just like it.

  5. Supertradmum says:

    I hate to sound pedestrian, but the beak is not that of those in the vireo family,nor is the beak like that of the titmouse family. The black eye gives it a narrow identification, with the black beak. I think it is either a baby American Crow, which is a handsomer baby than the grackle or starling. I would watch how it acts, as crows are very intelligent.

    Cute…

  6. Supertradmum says:

    I did not mean “either:-trying to cook a late lunch for the family and type at the same time. I have been bird watching since 1973 and have diaries from then to now-And, as I lived in Minnesota for five years, I am familiar with the amazingly beautiful birds up there.

  7. ejcmartin says:

    I checked on my iBird app and it is definitely a somethingerother. The little YIPPEE hop gave it away.

  8. Supertradmum says:

    I think, at a closer look, I need to see if there is a little extra tuft at the top of the bird’s head. And the size is hard to see. It may be a titmouse, but even baby crows are cute.

  9. Jaybirdnbham says:

    Might be a young tufted titmouse, as a few others have also suggested.

  10. introibo says:

    You mean you’ve never had a tufted titmouse before, Father? There pretty common here (CT) with all the other wintering birds like juncos and chickadees.

  11. AnAmericanMother says:

    He seems to lack the rusty flanks and black face of our titmice, probably because he’s a juvenile.

    Around here they are not rare at all. We are covered up with them in the winter, dozens in and around the feeders, not so much in the summer because they prefer insects.

  12. wanda says:

    What big eyes you have little birdie! Now he can really eyeball someone!

  13. jmhj5 says:

    I do not have the titmouse where I live now….I do so appreciate the appearance they made to you! Thank you Lord. Yesterday God sent wild turkeys…and today the titmouse…what next? Enjoy the behavior of the titmouse…they are so fun to watch.

  14. AnAmericanMother says:

    introibo,

    Conn is well within the titmouse’s range. Of course in GA we are smack in the middle.

    Chez Z is right at the NW corner of the range – Mr. Titmouse is almost a stray there.

  15. dans0622 says:

    Fr. Z., Have you seen this site for help in identifying birds?
    http://identify.whatbird.com/mwg/_/0/attrs.aspx

    It’s pretty neat.

    Dan

  16. Joan M says:

    I love to see these bird pictures! Also, that site that dacs0622 gave a link to is good.

    Fr. Z – would you give me permission to use some of the bird photos you post on the blog as reference photos for drawings or paintings I may wish to do?

  17. Joan M says:

    Thank you, Fr. Z. Should I succeed in completing a picture that I think does reasonable justice to one of the birds, I will send you a photo of it!

    I am, now in my retirement years, getting back to drawing and painting – something I have not done in 40 years!! Who knows – perhaps it could become an income earner in my old age!!!

  18. AnAmericanMother says:

    Joan M,

    Do please follow that up! Not only is it enjoyable, you might indeed begin a second career.

    My mother, who is 84 this year, retired from Georgia State University and took up painting.

    She has branched out into collage and sculpture, and her works are shown at the local art galleries, plus she has actually SOLD some! A little pin money for folks on a fixed income . . . .