Details about the new Compendium Eucharisticum

Some more detailed news about the new Compendium Eucharisticum:

Contrary to news reports the Compendium was published in Latin not Italian. 

Also, …

  1. It is divided into 3 sections: doctrinal, liturgical, and devotional. 
  2. It has number of appendices: Book IV of the Imitation; section of 1983 Latin Code; section of 1990 Eastern Code on the Eucharist.
  3. The preface is by the Prefect of the Cong. for Divine Worship, Card. Canizares.  It clearly speaks of both forms of the Roman Rite being of equal importance.
  4. The doctrinal section contains excerpts from the the decree of the Council of Trent on the Eucharist; Vatican II; the Compendium of the Catechism on the Eucharist; a commentary on the Four Eucharist prayers.
  5. The liturgical section contains the Ordo Missae of the Novus Ordo; the Ordo Missae of the 1962 Missale Romanum; the Office of Corpus Christi from the Liturgia Horarum; the complete Office for Coprus Christi from the 1961 Breviarium Romanum; two Votive Masses of the Holy Eucharist; the Order of Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament; 7 Litanies; and a number of Eucharistic hymns.
  6. The devotional part contains the prayers before Mass, the prayers after Mass, vesting prayers for the priest and for the bishop, and other devotional prayers.

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14 Responses to Details about the new Compendium Eucharisticum

  1. :)

    Was it somebody’s birthday?

  2. This is absolutely brilliant! Even without the old texts it would have been a good tool, but with them… it’s astounding. Imagine if every priest in the world received a copy of this (note for parishioners!!!), how many might look at the old Ordo by curiosity and think “hmmm – rather cool prayers them. Could be interesting to try.”?

    I hope it is already in the process of being translated into all the major languages.

  3. 4. The doctrinal section contains excerpts from the the decree of the Council of Trent on the Eucharist; Vatican II; the Compendium of the Catechism on the Eucharist; a commentary on the Four Eucharist prayers.

    I assume you mean excerpts from the “Compendium of the Catechism” which deal with the Eucharist, as opposed to some other document named the “Compendium of the Catechism on the Eucharist”, right?

    And the commentary on the Eucharistic Prayers will be most welcome. This book is now a primary source for me.

    6. The devotional part contains the prayers before Mass, the prayers after Mass, vesting prayers for the priest and for the bishop, and other devotional prayers.

    I wonder if there are meditations/reflections/commentaries on these devotional prayers. Even if not, the fact that they’re re-publishing the vesting prayers (utterly absent from the Missale Romanum for the past few decades) is a good sign.

  4. Bryan says:

    Already ordered it for my pastor in South Brunswick…wonder if he’ll be able to read the Latin, though. No Latin (or greek…except in very limited circumstances…mostly Advent and Lent where the kyrie and agnus dei is in the original languages set to chant…), lots of Haugen, Haas, etc for music.

    The gravitational pull is there…and the marching orders are pretty clear…wonder how long it will take to sink in that ‘business as usual’ is not the desired norm?

    It’s all in His hands, in any case.

  5. Tom in NY says:

    Liber novus subito “aureum veterus” fieret. Vilis ad pretium duplum.
    Salutationes omnibus.

  6. Agnes says:

    Somebody’s birthday! It was- but the reading would be a little heavy for a 9 year old. Again, waiting for seminary.

    Birthday, ordination day, Christmas, chust cuz days – all good opportunities to buy your priest a book and a WDTPRS coffee mug.

  7. Parochus says:

    Tom in NY, on this of all sites please watch your grammar. Better to say:

    Liber novus subito “vetulum aureum” fiat. Vilis esset pretio duplo.

    N.B.: There’s no word “veterus” in Latin; observe the difference between optative and contrary-to-fact uses of the subjunctive; don’t forget the ablative of price.

    In any case, what you say is true. Cheers!

  8. Tom in NY says:

    Gratias “Parochus” ago. “Vetus” corrigendum, adjectivum verbum “vetus, veteris..”, aut “vetulum,” nomen. Ablativo pretii oblito, non scripsi.
    Salutationes tibi.

  9. Agellius says:

    “It clearly speaks of both forms of the Roman Rite being of equal importance.”

    Fr. Z: Would you be able to post a translation of that part of it? I often run across people who maintain that the OF has precedence over the EF. That, for example, groups which primarily celebrate the EF should also give attention to the OF, whereas those which celebrate primarily the OF are free to completely ignore the EF.

  10. Geoffrey says:

    I wonder if this excellent book makes any mention or argument for “ad orientem”? It would be nice to open up more people to that!

  11. DCtrad says:

    “It clearly speaks of both forms of the Roman Rite being of equal importance.”

    Dear Father Z and fellow WDTPRS.com Readers,

    I still cannot understand this. Please can someone support how the mass of our time can be equal to the Mass of All Time? Concretely please, that is in it’s prayers and historical significance.

  12. Geoffrey says:

    I just thought of something else… isn’t this the first time that the Holy See has published a pre-Vatican II liturgical text?!

  13. S.J. Fisher says:

    Hmmm…Vesting Prayers. Wonder if it has the prayer for the Maniple. Fine ancient vestment, still required in the E Form. Is it forbidden in the O Form?