Well… I guess it isn’t so bad today

I often take my camera while on my appointed rounds and sometimes, just for kicks I snap a shot of something I have otherwise seen a zillion times.  All in all, Rome is a pretty photogenic place.  And to think… I have to walk around here all the time.

Navona 

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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8 Responses to Well… I guess it isn’t so bad today

  1. catholiclady says:

    Is that a male version of a mermaid? Those legs look pretty scaly.

  2. Andrew says:

    All kinds of things are put out in the name of art – things that normally just might be scandalizing.

    Drop your pants in public? You’ll be hauled off to jail. (As well as you should!)

    But make it out of granite and lo – it becomes art worthy of public display.

    Some day the world will have to give an account of its “artwork”.

  3. Andrew: You had better stay at home, I think. Safer that way.

  4. Andrew says:

    I would be right here if it were up to me to decide (to me this picture captures the essence of Christianity:

    http://www.fshcm.com/godrik.jpg

  5. Tim Ferguson says:

    Nice picture of St. Godrik, but…the essence of Christianity? Where’s the sacrifice, the oblative love of one’s brethren?

    Nope, a celebration of the human form, created by the hand of God as it is, is a wonderfully Christian thing.

  6. Andrew says:

    Countless canonized hermits are venerated by the Church. Much of His life Jesus was alone.
    (That is: if anyone is ever alone: we are probably never more alone than in the company of others and never more inactive when active).

  7. romanitas says:

    And the scaffolding is STILL, yet STILL, attached to the front
    of S Agnese.
    A Special prize ought to be offered to anyone blogging a photo of this church without such impediment

  8. Tim Ferguson says:

    I’m not denying the sanctity of the eremetical life. Still, I don’t think it embodies the “essence” of Christianity. Would you maintain that one can be a Christian without being a hermit? If so, then how could a it be the essence of Christianity? I don’t mean to be argumentative, I’m just curious.