First reports of Merton College workshop for priests and older Mass

First reports about the recent workshop at Merton College, Oxford, are coming in.  Damian Thompson of The Telegraph has an initial impression… and it was a good one.

My emphases and comments.

A glorious Mass at Merton College

Posted by Damian Thompson on 30 Aug 2007  at 12:58

My spirits are soaring after attending yesterday’s solemn traditional Mass at Merton College, Oxford, during the training course for priests organised by the Latin Mass Society.

It was glorious to see the sunlight piercing the pillar of incense as priest, deacon and sub-deacon performed the ancient liturgy for which Merton Chapel was built.

I’m going to write about this in more detail elsewhere, but the conference (which ends today) has been a triumph. What delighted me most was the enthusiasm and patent holiness of the priests attending – most of them ordinary parish clergy, not dyed-in-the-wool “traditionalists”.   [This is the truly significant bit in the whole event, I think.]

Everyone was buoyed up by the Archbishop of Birmingham’s sermon on Tuesday, which underlined the fact that the old barrier between older and newer forms of worship has been abolished by Pope Benedict.

Let’s hope that that the social barrier between Catholics attached to the newer and older forms of the Mass also disappears. The Pope understands that liturgical renewal will reinvigorate the whole Church; what Catholics need now are diocesan bishops who are willing implement his reform.  [And how!]

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32 Responses to First reports of Merton College workshop for priests and older Mass

  1. Brian Day says:

    It is nice when the media gets it. How refreshing.

  2. Dustin B. says:

    The Telegraph’s been running some surprisingly generous pieces on the new liturgical situation. I should add, though, surprising for the British press in general. It’s a prominent paper; any similarly favorable, or at least non-antagonistic coverage, in the mainstream press on this side of the pond?

    Father, while I find your characterization of the New York Times as “Satan’s Bible” rather amusing, perhaps it’s one more of those things that widens the social and attitudinal barrier between conservatives and liberals, within and outside of the Church. Perhaps you should widen the application of a couple of your five rules?

  3. danphunter1 says:

    The times they are a’changin.

  4. Derek James says:

    “Let’s hope that that the social barrier between Catholics attached to the newer and older forms of the Mass also disappears.”

    I find that rather amusing as an Englishman. especially as in the photographs the Knights of Malta are obviously involved, in Europe they have to have had the right to have arms (coats of) for four generations on both the fathers and mothers side. Fr Conlon, though a simple priest is also a chaplain of the Knights of Malta and therefore entitled, within the context of his Knightly function is entitled to be addressed “Monsignor”, in the photographs he is actually wearing a purple tasselled biretta.
    I can think of nothing more that defines “social barrier” than the KoM, though perhaps we English can be glad of the aristocratic idea of upper and lower classes, being united agains the upstart vulgarity of the middle class.

  5. Jim says:

    I was at Mass this afternoon, the Priest (senior honcho in the North of England)came out with a new version of the Eucharistic prayer that I have never heard before. Amongst the howlers were…”Opening the scriptures he broke the bread”….was that Scriptures a ‘la Boeuf Wellington, perhaps ???…then….”Whilst at table he passed the cup (to his disciples)”….least said the better on that one. Times may be changing danphunter….but these guys wont change peaceably, I’m afraid.
    I am only an ‘umble construction worker, but how does one acquire the education these guys have and still have such a Tin ear….????? I wish someone could explain that.

  6. DoB says:

    You know, the social barrier is artificial. So if the Bishops implement the reform, it will disapear. It’s great to have a positive piece. I spent quite some time squinting to see if I could figure out who was there that I might know. I suppose I will have to wait till September 14th for this and THE OTHER. Cruel anti-spam trick FR Z. I know you’re holding out on me, beastly, beastly, beastly.

  7. William says:

    I’m going to write about this in more detail elsewhere

    Please someone point us to the “more detail” when it appears.

    Father, while I find your characterization of the New York Times as “Satan’s Bible” rather amusing, perhaps it’s one more of those things that widens the social and attitudinal barrier between conservatives and liberals, within and outside of the Church.

    Many stands taken by the editorial pages of the New York Times are diametrically opposed to Catholic faith and morals. The New York Times is also one of the most respected and most read newspapers in the country. So I think calling it “Satan’s Bible” is quite fitting. However, it’s obviously somewhat tongue-in-cheek.

    Personally I don’t see how any orthodox Catholic could consider himself to be fully in either the “liberal” or “conservative” camp, as those terms are commonly used in the U.S. Our politics must be informed by our Catholic faith, and Catholic faith and morals do not fit into either of those two categories.

  8. I would agree with Damian’s impressions of the LMS Conference. I was there for the Masses on each day and they got progressively more beautiful and solemn. The Archbishop of Birmingham celebrated Mass on the first day in the ‘ordinary form’, hence there were 20+ concelebrating priests. The photo that accompanies Damian’s post and reproduced here is from the Archdiocese’s website and was taken after that Mass.

    On the second day there was Solemn Mass with beautiful Gregorian chant propers and Ordinary (XIII – Stelliferi conditor orbis). The Pontifical Mass today included a polyphonic setting of the Ordinary, Gregorian propers (for a virgin, it being the feast of St Rose of Lima), and an interesting motet by Purcell with (new?) Latin words.

    It was wonderful to see such a spectrum of priests who came seeking to understand & appreciate our liturgical heritage and I think many came with a good pastoral sense and an open heart. I enjoyed what little time I spent there. I didn’t stay for the workshops as there are some years before I am, God willing, to be ordained.

    However, I believe that we all came away with a sense of greater unity and love for the Sacred Liturgy, which I believe is what the Holy Father intends. This is an occasion for much hope in the UK, whatever the talk of social classes etc; in my experience, the ‘extraordinary form’ is loved by people of all backgrounds.

  9. Dustin B. says:

    Re: Jim’s comment. Creativity even within the confines of the multiplicity of Eucharistic prayers already provided is one of the more common modes of celebrant-manufactured liturgy even here in the States. No matter how many options and configurations the current revisions allow, which will no doubt expand in the future, one gets the feeling that a certain type of celebrant will never stop expanding the boundaries of novel liturgical praxis until the rules are scrapped entirely and all are allowed to improvise the whole thing, from Introit to Ite (so to speak). In disciplinary terms, how much more foreshortened can the hand of the Lord get?

  10. Joseph DeCaria says:

    Am I the only one who sees something strange in this picture? The article speaks of deacon and subdeacon, yet there appear to be concelebrants? Was this a “tridentinized” celebration of the ordinary rite?

  11. I would agree with Damian’s impressions of the LMS Conference. I was there for the Masses on each day and they got progressively more beautiful and solemn. The Archbishop of Birmingham celebrated Mass on the first day in the ‘ordinary form’, hence there were 20+ concelebrating priests. The photo that accompanies Damian’s post and reproduced here is from the Archdiocese’s website and was taken after that Mass.

    On the second day there was Solemn Mass with beautiful Gregorian chant propers and Ordinary (XIII – Stelliferi conditor orbis). The Pontifical Mass today included a polyphonic setting of the Ordinary, Gregorian propers (for a virgin, it being the feast of St Rose of Lima), and an interesting motet by Purcell with (new?) Latin words.

    It was wonderful to see such a spectrum of priests who came seeking to understand & appreciate our liturgical heritage and I think many came with a good pastoral sense and an open heart. I enjoyed what little time I spent there. I didn’t stay for the workshops as there are some years before I am, God willing, to be ordained.

    However, I believe that we all came away with a sense of greater unity and love for the Sacred Liturgy, which I believe is what the Holy Father intends. This is an occasion for much hope in the UK, whatever the talk of social classes etc; in my experience, the ‘extraordinary form’ is loved by people of all backgrounds.

  12. Joseph DeCaria says:

    Am I the only one who sees something strange in this picture? The article speaks of deacon and subdeacon, yet there appear to be concelebrants? Was this a “tridentinized” celebration of the ordinary rite?

  13. Craigmaddie says:

    Am I the only one who sees something strange in this picture? The article speaks of deacon and subdeacon, yet there appear to be concelebrants? Was this a “tridentinized” celebration of the ordinary rite?

    I believe that this is a photo from the first Mass of the seminar which the Archbishop offered and which was a Latin Novus Ordo. Hence the concelebration.

  14. John Polhamus says:

    “Was this a “tridentinized” celebration of the ordinary rite?”

    The London Oratory has been doing it for thirty years. If you’re going to have two or more concelebrating priests, and there’s no reason why two of them should not wear either two other matching chasubles or dalmatics, or dalmatic and tunicle as available. Nor is there any reason that they should not adopt traditional or traditionalized posture and location during the cannon, even during versus populum celebration, but more especially during ad orientem celebration. “Un-lined living-room curtain off-white” is not mandatory. It’s simply a matter of viewing the liturgy through the Hermeneutic of Continuity. At Chorus Breviarii San Diego we’ve been doing it for six years. The problem has always been the lack of awareness of traditional options not specifically stated, but not specifically forbidden either. Hopefully now, that liturgical latitude will come to the fore in the church.

  15. Stephen says:

    Are Catholics obligated to believe that the MP was prompted by the Holy Spirit, as this bishop says? Never heard of this sort of linkage for a document such as the MP.

    Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown

    The Holy Spirit has prompted our Holy Father to address the matter of the Tridentine Mass.

  16. leo says:

    the archbishop of birmingham is shrewd not traditional

  17. Rumold says:

    The Archbishop of Birmingham is indeed shrewd rather than traditional.He trims his sails to the prevailing wind and he knows the way the wind is blowing if he is to reach his goal of Westminster.The Holy Father has no great liking for careerist bishops.It would be wonderful if another Nichols were to succeed to Westminster.I mean ,of course, Aidan Nichols OP.

  18. Syriacus says:

    Meanwhile, in Germany , SCHOCKING declarations by the Vice-President of the German Episcopal Conference, Bishop Mussinghoff of Aachen (Aquisgrana):

    “The German Bishops meeting in September, will decide for common regulations for the celebration of the old Mass.” (Practically, to extend to all Germany shared ‘guidelines’for the MP’s implementation -similar to those issued by Bishop Mixa in Augsburg.)

    Bishop Mussinghoff added that priests in his diocese won’t be allowed to simply answer “yes” to the requests of the faithful (cause they “are too few” for the ordinary parish life). (There are also “too few” 1962 Missals around in his diocese, etc…)

    Plus: the question of the old lectionary must be discussed in Rome, cause, “it contains too less Old Testament”. Also the problems with the old Good Friday would be too much…

    - – -

    Die katholischen Bischöfe wollen im September einheitliche Grundsätze zur Feier der alten Messe vereinbaren.

    Das kündigte der Aachener Bischof Heinrich Mussinghoff jetzt an. Der stellvertretende Vorsitzende der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz sagte: „Wir werden Regelungen finden, die alle Bischöfe akzeptieren. Da besteht eine große Einheit.“ Die Messe solle nur von Priestern gelesen werden, „die voll und ganz hinter dem Zweiten Vatikanischen Konzil stehen“. Einen Rechtsanspruch auf die tridentinische Messe könnten Gläubige aber im Bistum Aachen nicht gegenüber ihrem Pfarrer erheben, sagte Mussinghoff. Das gehe schon aus praktischen Gründen nicht. Wenn ein Pfarrer für sechs Gemeinden zuständig sei und in einer Kirche nur jeden zweiten Sonntag Eucharistie feiern könne, müsse das eine Messe für alle sein.
    > Die Ortsbischöfe hatten Anfang der Woche beim Ständigen Rat ein erstes Gespräch über die Umsetzung des Papst-Erlasses geführt, wie Mussinghoff sagte. Bei ihrem Herbsttreffen vom 24. bis 27. September in Fulda wollen sie die Beratungen fortsetzen. Zu regeln ist nach den Worten des Bischofs etwa die Leseordnung der alten Messe. Sie enthalte bedauerlicherweise weniger Texte aus dem Alten Testament als die neue. „Das wäre ein Verlust, über den man mit Rom reden muss.“ Festzulegen ist nach Angaben des Vize-Vorsitzenden auch, wie die alten Riten künftig in die Priester-Ausbildung einbezogen werden. „Man muss dabei sehen, wie viele Priester den Ritus denn mögen und auch Latein können.“ In den meisten Gemeinden fehlten zudem Messbücher von 1962. Geklärt werden müsse auch die Frage nach der alten Karfreitagsbitte für eine Juden-Bekehrung, die von jüdischer Seite scharf kritisiert worden war. Nach der begrenzten Wiederzulassung der alten lateinischen Messe durch Papst Benedikt XVI. hat bislang nur das Bistum Augsburg Durchführungsbestimmungen herausgegeben. (kna)

    See also: http://kirchensite.de/index.php?mySID=f7568aaadc72a09db78f70f3724c7fbd&myELEMENT=137440

    —-If you just have a look at the last part (wide Roman connections, power in German Church, intense ecumenical relations, also with Jews: a consommè of the mainstream state-of-the-art episcopal power-block) of Mussinghoff’s curriculum, you will be even more frightened…

    [...]
    15.05.1995

    berufen als Mitglied des Obersten Gerichtshofes der Apostolischen Signatur in Rom
    23.07.2000 und 04.07.2006 erneut als Mitglied des Obersten Gerichtshofes der Apostolischen Signatur in Rom berufen
    07.03.1995 Wahl zum Mitglied der Kommission VIII der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz für Fragen der Wissenschaft und Kultur
    24.09.1996 Wahl zum Vorsitzenden der Kommission VIII
    25.09.2001 und 26.09.2006 erneute Wahl zum Vorsitzenden der Kommission VIII
    24.09.1996-26.09.2001

    Mitglied der Glaubenskommission (K I) der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz
    seit März 1999 Mitglied der römischen Kleruskongregation
    21.09.1999

    Wahl zum stellvertretenden Vorsitzenden der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz
    20.09.2005 erneute Wahl zum Stellvertretenden Vorsitzenden der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz
    25.9.2001-26.09.2006

    Mitglied der Kommission X der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz für Weltkirchliche Aufgaben
    26.09.2006

    Wahl zum Mitglied der Ökumenekommission (K II) der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz
    26.09.2006

    Wahl zum Vorsitzenden der am 26.09.2006 errichteten Unterkommission der K II “für die religiösen Beziehungen zum Judentum”

    http://www.kirche-im-bistum-aachen.de/kiba/dcms/traeger/4/bistum-ac/bischof/tablebenslauf.html

    ——————————————————————————————-

    Is it a time of episcopal war against Summorum Pontificum approaching (e.g.) in Germany
    (…after the apparent initial “peaceful acceptance” ) ??

  19. Jim says:

    Ye..eesss…I’ve just walked home from “The Pub”…had a couple of drinks, musing on Vincent Nichols and his “fence sitting” posture. Also take into consideration, that certain “Anglophone” personages….lost their shirts betting on Martini…we know who they are….and they know, that we know, that their raiment is still “NAILED” forlornly, shredded in the winds of change blowing through the Church,…… Isn’t that so “PADDY’S”.
    But the game is far from over. Today I re-joined the Latin Mass Society..I think I was a member of Una Voce (Scotland) in the early 80′s, but it’s all a bit of a blur to be honest. The posts about the German bishops make for worrying reading, the real Mass was never abrogated, so why did so few ever rally to it..???. It seems to me that , like my 80′s Una Voce subscription, when pressure is applied….when Vince starts playing hard ball…a lot of heads will disappear under the parapet….I’m not wrong am I..???. Therefore, I think that the Pope has to , must, play the strongest hand in his (OUR) pack…even stronger than the Motu Proprio..??? he must free the “Original Traditionalists”. Once their constitutions are “enshrined” in Canon Law….then, truly there is no fence left to sit on….is there Vince..???

  20. DoB says:

    Jim,
    are you drunk?

  21. Az says:

    “Was this a “tridentinized” celebration of the ordinary rite?”

    “The London Oratory has been doing it for thirty years.”
    Not quite, though this is often assumed to be the case. The two “deacons”, more often than not priests, do not concelebrate, but perform the diaconal roles. The celebrant presides over the Liturgy of the Word not at the altar, but from the sedilia/bench. Of course, one could argue that Inter Oecumenici (1964/5?) requires this anyway in the old rite. The sacred ministers do not adopt a “Tridentine” posture in the sanctuary, most notably, there is no humeral veil, nor do they stand on the predella in the old style, each on a different level, but alongside the celebrant.

  22. jaykay says:

    Az said: “The two “deacons”, more often than not priests, do not concelebrate, but perform the diaconal roles.”

    I’ve (vaguely) wondered about this when attending the Oratory High Mass. Given that one of them is in effect in what would be the sub-diaconal role under the Ext. Rite, although such an order doesn’t exist any longer, how do they actually “divide” (if one could put it that way)
    the role of deacon? I take it that the rubrics for deacons in the NO are minimal so in other words how are the various actions proper to a deacon assigned as between the two?

  23. Monsignor (now Bishop) Elliot suggests there should be a Deacon of the Word and a Deacon of the Altar at solemn celebrations when possible, so presumably one of them takes the lead and proclaims the Gospel and the other takes the lead at the Altar.

  24. Jim says:

    In my diocese (Santa Rosa, CA), the diocesan clergy are so opposed to the extraordinary rite, and there is such a shortage of priests, that it will take an act of God to reestablish the ancient mass — even assuming the good graces of the bishop. I also think that any clergy who might be tempted to say the old mass will be wary of the reception they may receive from their more “liberal” brethren. So the motu proprio is really quite academic around here.

  25. English Jim,

    Do you live in Yorkshire?

    I lived there for almost a year, went on an exchange to St. John’s College in
    York. Loved it and the people there. The Catholics…..
    especially the old ones are very stout-hearted.

    Incidentally, my paternal grandfather’s family is from Yorkshire, they came to
    Canada in 1912. Yorkshire was one of the strong “hold-outs” against the
    first wave of bad bishops in the 1500′s. Robert Aske, a Catholic hero,
    lead the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion against Henry VIII and was
    executed in York along with so many others.

    I thank God that many like you have held out against this second wave.

  26. RBrown says:

    Monsignor (now Bishop) Elliot suggests there should be a Deacon of the Word and a Deacon of the Altar at solemn celebrations when possible, so presumably one of them takes the lead and proclaims the Gospel and the other takes the lead at the Altar.

    Does he also want a third deacon to give the homily?

  27. RBrown says:

    Bishop Mussinghoff added that priests in his diocese won’t be allowed to simply answer “yes” to the requests of the faithful (cause they “are too few” for the ordinary parish life). (There are also “too few” 1962 Missals around in his diocese, etc…)

    That’s excuse-making rivaling that of the Nazi bigwigs at the Nuremberg Trials.

  28. Greg Smisek says:

    The usus recentior approves of divvying up duties (GIRM-2002 [US version, 2003], n. 109; GIRMs-1969-1975, n. 71):

    If there are several persons present who are able to exercise the same ministry, nothing forbids their distributing among themselves and performing different parts of the same ministry or duty. For example, one deacon may be assigned to take the sung parts, another to serve at the altar; if there are several readings, it is well to distribute them among a number of lectors. The same applies for the other ministries. But it is not at all appropriate that several persons divide a single element of the celebration among themselves, e.g., that the same reading be proclaimed by two lectors, one after the other, except as far as the Passion of the Lord is concerned.

    The 2002 GIRM also directs the reader (n. 112) to the Ceremonial of Bishops:

    At a Mass celebrated by the Bishop or at which he presides without celebrating the Eucharist,
    the norms found in the Caeremoniale Episcoporum should be observed.

    According to the 1984 Ceremonial of Bishops (n. 26), in addition to the deacon of the Mass, at an episcopal Mass there ought to be two more deacons, whose sole purpose is to assist the bishop (just as in the earlier Pontifical Mass), and there may be others:

    At a liturgical celebration presided over by a bishop there should be at least three deacons, one to proclaim the gospel reading and to minister at the altar, and two to assist the bishop. If more than three deacons are present, they should divide the ministries accordingly, and at least one of them should be charged with assisting the active participation of the faithful.

    The chapter on the Stational Mass says virtually the same thing, but also treats of priests substituting for deacons. N. 122 begins,

    It is preferable that as a rule at least three deacons, properly so called, assist in a stational Mass,

    and concludes,

    If deacons properly so called are not available, their ministries should be carried out by presbyters, who, vested as priests, concelebrate with the bishop, even if they must also celebrate another Mass for the pastoral benefit of the faithful.

    I’ve rarely seen an episcopal Mass in the U.S. where the assistant deacons didn’t also perform the function of the deacon of the Mass. I think it might be due to a false sense of “active participation” and “noble simplicity.”

    Incidentally, the 1984 Ceremonial of Bishops did explicitly abrogate the previous ceremonial, although it still refers to it several times in the footnotes of the chapter on General Norms. True, it “cannot be regarded as a liturgical book in the proper sense” (decree of publication), but it would seem minimally necessary for implementing Summorum Pontificum‘s norm 9 § 2 on “celebrating the sacrament of Confirmation using the older Pontificale Romanum.” Any canon lawyers care to comment?

  29. Alex says:

    It is refreshing to see three bishops at this training at Merton College, posing next to Bishop Fernando Rifan of Campos (Brasil), Apostolic Administrator, ordained and consecrated in the ancient rite. Deo gratias.

  30. While it is true that in the Novus Ordo the diaconal function may be divided amongst one or more deacons this clearly doesn’t address Joseph DeCaria’s comment. With two bishops in chasubles and mitres plus numerous other concelebrants (and no apparent deacon or subdeacon) it is obvious that this is the opening Mass which was Latin Novus Ordo. It is merely co-incidence that this picture accompanies Damien Thompson’s description to other Massesin teh Older Form.

    Regarding the comments about the New York Times, that newspaper is indeed highly respected although it may well take liberal positions on issues like abortion etc. But the conservative newspapers are often rags which blindly drag people into Bush’s disastrous wars (Iraq was opposed by the Church and can by no stretch be considered pro-life). Looking at things from a Canadian vantage point it seems to me that this is symptomatic of the terrible polarization that now exists in the U.S. A true Catholic cannot be liberal in all things nor conservative in all things. Personally I try to be Christian in all things.

    Canada, is a more Catholic country and a more liberal country. Catholic governments have given us Medicare (which is good)and abortion on demand and same sex marriage (which are bad). The mix makes voting awkward.

    But the truth is that it is wrong to blame the politicians. They are merely reflecting the values of many if not most Catholics in this country.

    Fighting battles at election time or before the courts is a waste of time. The real battle is against the relativism of the Cathoic people and I’m sure that this is largely true in the U.S as well. Change the people and the Political Parties will change. And I am convinced that the biggest weapon in terms of restoring Christian values and saving our Christian civilization (which is in danger of collapse) is the revival of the Usus Antiquior. Bring the people back to Mass. Bring the people back to God. The rest will take care of itself.

    Does Pope Benedict know what he is doing?

    You bet he does! In spades!!

  31. Greg Smisek says:

    I apologize if the intent of my previous comment was not clear. It was addressed to jaykay’s question and the subsequent discussion on the exercise of the diaconal ministry in the Novus Ordo Mass, not Mr. DeCaria’s question (which I assumed had been answered 15 posts earlier). It was also intended to come to the aid of the good Bishop of Manaccenser.

    The excerpts above from the current Ceremonial of Bishops point out two practices of the Novus Ordo Mass of a bishop, one in continuity with the earlier usage (assistant deacons distinct from the deacon of the Mass) and another in discontinuity with it (priests who supply the diaconal ministries in the absence of deacons are to vest as priests and concelebrate with the bishop). The first seems to be widely ignored (or perhaps there is just widespread ignorance of it). But the second is not always followed either (and I’m not sure whether the injunction applies equally when the principal celebrant is a priest rather than a bishop).

  32. Frank says:

    I haven’t had the opportunity to attend a High Mass at Brompton Oratory for a few years, but I can comment on the High Mass at Birmingham Oratory. Archbishop Nichols has celebrated High Mass at the Oratory on several occasions, and he seemed quite at home with the liturgical practice.
    The office of deacon is usually filled by a priest, unless there is a deacon in the community (prior to be ordained priest) or a visiting deacon. In either case, the deacon is vested in diaconal stole & dalmatic. The subdeacon may be either a priest or a novice in the community & is vested in the tunicle/dalmatic (in most of the High Mass sets these are identical in form).
    The deacon’s role is the same as in the extraordinary form, except that he reads the Bidding Prayers, and carries the chalice (with veil & burse) from the credence to the altar. The subdeacon reads the second reading/epistle and brings the cruets to the altar. He does not wear the humeral veil or hold the paten. At the consecration he kneels on the bottom step of the altar & incenses the Blessed Sacrament.
    At the altar, the deacon & subdeacon used to stand either side of the celebrant, but this was changed to the more traditional form of standing in line on the steps behing the celebrant about 10 years ago.
    In short, the ritual represents an updating of the extraordinary form retaining continuity rather than a new rite. If the MP enables a more widespread availablity of similar Masses the future looks bright.