Sale of older Mass handmissals rocketing

Here is an interesting piece.  What it reports isn’t really much of a surprise, but it confirms what we know was going to happen. 

Latin Mass Missal Sales Double

LONDON, SEPT. 20, 2007 (Zenit.org).- Since Benedict XVI’s letter on the Latin Mass was released this summer, sales of the missal for the extraordinary rite have doubled, reported one publisher.

The London-based Baronius Press is reprinting an edition of the missal, which includes the full text of the papal letter "Summorum Pontificum."

John Newton, editor of Baronius Press, commented, "It would seem that ‘Summorum Pontificum,’ has generated a considerable amount of interest and excitement in the traditional Latin liturgy among the Catholic laity."

Also, I have noted here in Rome (where I am right now) that at the Leoniana bookstore, near the Vatican, there are two different reprint editions of Latin/Italian handmissals for the older use of Mass.  I gave them just a quick glance, but one of them seems not to be a 1962 (for example, St. Joseph is missing from the Canon – which is the smoking gun).  The other is very much like a Latin/French edition I got years ago at La Barroux.  It is nice, with leather binding and gold edged pages.  I saw the Baronius edition mentioned in the Zenit piece.  It is also very nice, and useful.  I recommend it.

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27 Responses to Sale of older Mass handmissals rocketing

  1. William says:

    A few days ago I received an email from Angelus Press asking for donations to help them more quickly print more of their hand missals.

    I also know that the 1962 version of the German Schott missal has been reprinted. It is supposedly available from introibo.net, but I haven’t had much luck getting one yet.

    An alternative source for missals is antiquarian/used book shops, which are well represented on the web. I bought a nice leather bound 1959 Schott missal that way a few months ago.

  2. Dustin says:

    I’ve been interested in buying one of the newer lay missals available, but I see few real differences between the Baronius and Angelus editions. Is anyone out there familiar enough with both to make a case for one or the other? Or how about someone devoted to one of these two and trying passionately to persuade me toward a purchase?

  3. Diane says:

    Fr. Z: I wonder if it was a different version you saw from Baronius Press. They are still taking pre-orders on the Summorum Pontificum edition, unless one batch was already released.

    The Baronius Press Summorum Pontificum edtion, which has a foreword and imprimatur by Bishop Bruskewitz, could be the same book as the Angelus Press version. But, Angelus is the publishing arm of the SSPX. Many stores fully aligned with the Holy See are selling it and buying it without knowing this, inadvertently providing financial support to the society.

    If I did not have one, I would pre-order the Baronius Press version and wait it out. But, I do have an Angelus Press version and can attest, it is indeed a beautiful, and robust Missal with content that extends far beyond the Mass.

    I’m going to buy a Baronius and will compare the two. If anyone has both, I would be interested in knowing if it appears to be the same book. Once so many years passes, I think it is up for grabs in terms of who may republish it, unless someone else took out a copyright on it.

    I’d like to know who the original publisher was of the one used by the SSPX since they were not around in 1962.

  4. Diane says:

    I should add that I had gotten my missal off of eBay without knowing anything about Angelus Press. In fact, most places don’t list the publisher from what I’ve seen in my travels.

    The FSSP is advocating the Baronius Press Missal too. In fact, they have a 2004 version available, (which incidentally is the same year as my Angelus Press version).

  5. Dustin says:

    Thanks, Diane. Both of the editions are, from what I’ve read, entirely new editions from their respective publishers, and not re-published or photocopied versions like the old re-released Fr. Lasance missal. As for Angelus Press, I don’t have many qualms about buying an SSPX-associated product, as they are still Catholic, though certainly in an irregular situation. In the interest of loyalty to certain decisions of the Church, however, I’m leaning toward Baronius’, which I read carries the Bishop of Lincoln, NE’s imprimatur. But I’ve also seen the Angelus edition advertised online for the cut rate of $50, the cheapest price I’ve seen for either.

  6. Ben says:

    I also note that the second best selling book for September from PaxBooks,
    the Vatican online bookstore, is the 1962 Missal.

    (The best seller is the 2008 liturgical ordo, which I guess is always going
    to be the autumn chart-topper.)

  7. P says:

    Where can a 1962 altar missal be bought? That would make a great gift for a priest friend or local church.

  8. Tom says:

    Last week I purchased an Angelus press version at the National Shrine bookstore in DC fully unaware of its affiliation with the SSPX. I was pleasantly surprised to find an entire display of resources available to priests and laity, including copies of Summorum Pontificum. I am new to all things Catholic (recent convert). Could someone advise as to whether I should feel comfortable owning and using this Missal?

  9. David says:

    I have both editions (Baronius and Angelus). The most significant difference is the font size of the latin text throughout the propers and other devotions in the missals. If you care about being able to read the above mentioned latin texts than I would advise getting the Angelus edition as the baronius print is to small. To be clear, the latin text for the ordinary of the mass in the Baronius missal uses a good size font and is easy enough to read.

  10. William says:

    Regarding the Angelus/Baronius Missals, Their content is almost identical: both are edited, enhanced, and retypeset versions of an older missal (can’t remember the name off the top of my head). Due to the different typesetting, their “look” is different, and the Angelus missal is noticeably thinner for some reason (thinner paper?).

    I selected the Angelus missal because I preferred the type, and the fact that is is thinner and easier to hold in the hand, in my opinion.

    Angelus Press is, indeed, associated with the SSPX and Baronius Press with the FSSP. I have purchased several books published by either Angelus Press or Sarto House (also SSPX-affiliated), although I have never been to an SSPX mass.

    I have absolutely no problem “supporting” the SSPX to the extent of treating their publishing operations like any other commercial entity. Their products are truly excellent and I recommend them to all catholics as a source for catholic books such as Blessed Be God, My Catholic Faith, Iota Unum, Divine Office.

    It is not as if the SSPX were spreading heresy, or were an anti-catholic organization seeking to harm the Church. They are in an irregular situation because of their excommunicated bishops; so sure, don’t let yourself get sucked into their irregular situation, but go ahead and buy their books to the extent that they are useful.

  11. techno_aesthete says:

    Fr. Z., The other [Latin/Italian handmissal] is very much like a Latin/French edition I got years ago at La Barroux. It is nice, with leather binding and gold edged pages.

    Could you give more details (title, publisher, ISBN, etc.) so that I can see if it is available at IBS? Thanks.

  12. Ian says:

    The bestselling items right now at our store are the red booklet and the new (and very nicely done) booklet for the Tridentine Mass. We have also gone through over 100 1962 daily missals in the last few weeks and have sold close to a dozen of the 1960/62 altar missals from Roman Catholic Book.

    Veil sales are also up.

  13. Rob F. says:

    Ben notes that the Johanine edition of the Missale Romanum is number two in sales at paxbook.com. I think that’s great! Unfortunately, the Latin 2002 edition of the does not even make it into the top 25 :(

    I too fear that Summorum Pontificum may hurt Latin celebrations of the Pauline use.

    On the plus side, Latin breviary sales are remaining quite good.

  14. Rob F. says:

    Ben notes that the Johanine edition of the Missale Romanum is number two in sales at paxbook.com. I think that’s great! Unfortunately, the Latin 2002 edition of the missal does not even make it into the top 25 :(

    I too fear that Summorum Pontificum may hurt Latin celebrations of the Pauline use.

    On the plus side, Latin breviary sales are remaining quite good.

  15. I have reviewed both missals. The missal from Angelus press containes MORE than the Baronius edition. Namely, the Kyriale with Gregorian chant notation, as well as several other Gregorian hymns, etc. I used it at Mass, and did not have to change books to sing the Gregorian chant of the Mass. The Angelus edition is a totally new creation, whereas the Baronius, from what I understand, and please correct me if i am wrong, is a reprint of an older missal.

    Also, communion in the hand is NOT permitted at the traditional Mass, because it was not part the rubrics, and in fact was forbidden. I agree with Fr. McDonald. Let’s not start changing the traditional Mass all over again.

    William A. Torchia, Esq.
    Philadelphia

  16. Paul says:

    Does anyone know when pre-orders for the Baronius missal will be shipped? I’ve ordered one but until it arrives I have only an ancient Sunday missal!

  17. Could you please explain, Father, what the “smoking gun” is, i.e., St. Joseph is not included in the canon. Those of us who grew up with the traditional Mass, did not throw away our Missals, but just wrote St. Joseph in the margin, as the priests did in the altar missals. I do not see this as a problem.

    Also I remember that when the 1962 edition of the Missale Romanum cam into effct, pastors who had just purchased new missals, or whose missals were in good condition, could continue to use the older Missal, with, of course, St. Joseph added to the canon.

    William A. Torchia, Esq.
    Philadelphia

  18. Ian says:

    The Baronius Missal is scheduled to come back into print sometime in October. I personally like the Angelus Press version better.

  19. brenda says:

    I too have both versions. Bot are good and very similar but on balance I prefer the Angelus. Three factors. First a much more ‘carriable’ size makes it more convenient (the Baronius is very thick). Secondly, the Latin print in the Baronius strains my eyes, it seems to assume the reader will only read the English translation. Thirdly, Angelus gives better rubrical directions (when the bells are rung, etc) and points explaining what is happening at various point in the Mass that I find helpful.

  20. brenda says:

    I too have both versions. Both are good and very similar but on balance I prefer the Angelus. Three factors. First a much more ‘carriable’ size makes it more convenient (the Baronius is very thick). Secondly, the Latin print in the Baronius strains my eyes, it seems to assume the reader will only read the English translation. Thirdly, Angelus gives better rubrical directions (when the bells are rung, etc) and points explaining what is happening at various point in the Mass that I find helpful.

  21. David M.O'Rourke says:

    The scans I have seen of the Baronius Missal look very similar to my St. Andrew’s Daily Missal (Imprimatur 1957). I have never seen a more complete missal with rich doctrinal and liturgical commentaries on the various feasts and seasons, a full Kyriale, Music for Sunday Vespers and Antiphons for Vespers of Greater feasts, a map and list of the stational Churches and so on. It is one of my greatest treasures.

    My only problem with buying any new Missal is that the Holy Father left open the possibility that some of the more recently canonised saints may be added to the calendar and, as well, some new Prefaces might be introduced. That might mean a new Typical edition. In any event it would mean additions to the current book.

  22. Martin says:

    Can anyone suggest a 1962 Sunday Missal Latin/English edition? I ask for several reasons:

    1. I have four children and cannot afford 2,000 page Daily Missals for them all;
    2. Most Catholics (if they attend Mass at all) only attend on Sundays and Holy Days; and
    3. We should assume that as any revival gathers momentum, most interested people would at least be initially seeking to purchase an attractive Sunday Missal, before committing to a Daily Missal.

  23. Colleen says:

    Martin, get some Sunday Missal Booklets for $5 each: http://angeluspress.org/index.php?act=warehouse&info=6636

  24. Sean says:

    There seem to be plenty of weekday missals (covering all days) available but any chance of someone coming out with a small missal (Sundays and principal feasts only) or a Sunday missal (Sundays only)?

  25. Geoffrey says:

    Sean:

    Yes! It’s in the works… ;-)

  26. Henry Edwards says:

    Sean:

    My Sunday Missal
    Neumann Press
    http://neumannpress.stores.yahoo.net/mysundaymissal.html

    Pocket-sized, but the sample Latin-English facing pages on the back of their hard copy catalogue look clear and readable. Contains complete Masses for Sundays and holy days. Reprint of a classic pre-1962 Sunday missal. (Probably a majority of daily missals seen at 1962 Masses are actually pre-1962, but probably most folks never spot a difference.)

    St. Joseph Children’s Missal
    http://neumannpress.stores.yahoo.net/stjoschilmis.html

    Maybe a bit pricey for a children’s missal, and (not having actually seen one) it’s not clear whether it’s more missal or more story book. Reprint of a 1959 original.

  27. ssoldie says:

    Got my 1957 Missal, It’s pretty well worn but use it every Sunday, dosen’t have St Joseph’s name in Roman Canon, but don’t figure it’s not that big a deal as the N.O. has St Joseph’s name in the 1st “euchristic” prayer, but it is so seldom used, as the second “euchristic” prayer is almost always used even on Sundays.