Chicago: Wonderful liturgical eye-candy, St. John Cantius style

Summorum Pontificum will be exerting a powerful influence on the way people understand liturgical practice, the ars celebrandi, what our liturgical heritage is, how to think of worship in terms of continuity rather than rupture.  The thought and example of Papa Ratzinger will bear fruit.

But some pastors have understood these things all along.   For years, even decades, they have worked – very much an uphill climb – to implement the Church’s liturgical changes and documents as they were written, in keeping with our heritage.  They faced opposition, but remained firm in their purpose, building rather than tearing down.

St. John Cantius has been in the vanguard of the continuity movement ever since Fr. Frank Phillips took over in the 1980’s and found a devastated parish in the depressed part of town.  

Patiently, he worked to restore the parish’s identity – which is a critical dimension of Papa Ratzinger’s "Marshall Plan" for the Church – especially by embracing the Polish heritage of the people who built the church and once lived in that area of Chicago.  He made sure Holy Mass was celebrated reverently, and with the full possibilities of sacred music, not only in the Novus Ordo but also with the "Tridentine" Mass.

Then Fr. Phillips had the vision of starting a group of Canons who would extend this same understanding of liturgical and spiritual continuity.

In such an environment, with such a vision, the vocations, of course, started to blossom.  

No surprise there.  None at all.   Do what the Church asks  – men will respond.  No surprise.   This is not rocket science.  It’s just common sense.

Here is some wonderful liturgical eye-candy from the great St. John Cantius Church on the north side of Chicago.

Here is the page from their site, which they asked me to share with you!

Two New Priests for the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius

Jun. 2, 2008

On May 29, 2008, Rev. Anthony Rice, S.J.C. and Rev. Bartholomew Juncer, S.J.C. were ordained to the priesthood by His Eminence, Francis Cardinal George, Archbishop of Chicago for the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius. The Mass of Ordination was offered in Latin according to the Ordinary Form (Missale Romanum 2003). The Most Rev. Joseph N. Perry and The Most Rev. Thomas A. Paprocki, Auxiliary Bishops of Chicago were in attendance. Numerous priests concelebrated the Mass. The church was full as parishioners and friends of St. John Cantius Church as well as the patrons of the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius were present for this special occasion.

The Resurrection Choir and Orchestra provided music, along with the Schola Cantorum of St. Gregory the Great. Some of the pieces included:

Missa Brevis in D Major, K 194 – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 – 1791)
Veni Sancte Spiritus, K. 47 – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 – 1791)
Ecce Sacerdos – Edward Elgar (1857 – 1934)
Concerto in D Major – Giuseppe Torelli (1685 – 1709)
Concerto for 2 Trumpets in C Major, RV 537 – Antonio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741)

Fr. Bartholomew Juncer, S.J.C. offered his Solemn Mass of Thanksgiving on Sunday, June 1st at 12:30 p.m. at St. John Cantius Church in Chicago. The Most Rev. Joseph N. Perry, Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago, delivered the homily at the Solemn High Mass offered in the Extraordinary Form (1962 Missale Romanum). The Resurrection Choir and Orchestra will sing the Mozart Mass in C, K 220.

On Sunday, June 1st, at 9:00 a.m., Fr. Anthony Rice, S.J.C. offered a Tridentine Solemn High Mass (1962 Missale Romanum) at St. John Cantius Church in Chicago. Rev. C. Frank Phillips, C.R., Founder and Superior of the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius, offered the homily.

Photos of the Ordination

During the litany of saints

“Do you promise respect and obedience to me and my successors?”

H.E. Francis Cardinal George ordaining Fr. Bartholomew Juncer, S.J.C. and Fr. Anthony Rice, S.J.C.

H.E. Francis Cardinal George and Fr. Frank Phillips, C.R. extending the sign of peace to the newly ordained.

Deacon Paul Guzman assists Francis Cardinal George during the incensing of the altar at the offertory

Elevation of the Host

Elevation of the Chalice

Concelebrating priests

Incensing the altar during the singing of the Te Deum

Newly ordained Fr. Bartholomew Juncer, S.J.C. and Father Anthony Rice S.J.C giving their first priestly blessing to His Eminence Francis Cardinal George, The Most Rev. Joseph N. Perry, and The Most Rev. Thomas A. Paprocki.

The Recessional

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72 Responses to Chicago: Wonderful liturgical eye-candy, St. John Cantius style

  1. Tina says:

    Can you explain what a canon is and how they (if they do) differ from a regular priest? I thought canon had to do with law?

    Thanks

  2. bryan says:

    And, with the extra benefit of being able to watch the FSSP ordinations last week
    on EWTN.

    This is most certainly eye candy. And the way it should be done.

  3. I wonder if Cardinal George would be open to ordaining priests in the Old Rite?

  4. RichR says:

    Can you explain what a canon is and how they (if they do) differ from a regular priest? I thought canon had to do with law?

    Thanks

    http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03252a.htm

  5. EJ says:

    Aside from just being eye candy, this is a great day for all of us struggling to bring about a reform of the reform FOR THE NOVUS ORDO specifically. The Cardinal Archbishop of Chicago has celebrated an ordination Mass in the OF, in Latin and ad orientem – this is huge, even to those who legitimately do not prefer the Novus Ordo, one can’t easily underestimate occasions like this one.

  6. ThomasB says:

    According to St. Thomas Aquinas, a canon regular is essentially a religious cleric, or, as the same doctor aptly expresses it: “The Order of Canons Regular is necessarily constituted by religious clerics, because they are essentially destined to those works which relate to the Divine mysteries, whereas it is not so with the monastic Orders.”

    More at:

    http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03288a.htm

  7. Crusader says:

    In seeing the beauty of this Mass, my reaction is “I’ve been robbed!”. THIS is what the reform should have looked like if it hadn’t been hijacked by Modernists.

  8. Tom says:

    I agree with Father Z that offering Holy Mass reverently is important.

    But there is far more than that regarding the Latin Church’s liturgical crisis.

    The Nationals Stadium Papal Mass was offered reverently.

    Mass is offered reverently at my parish and parishes that I have visited throughout my diocese.

    We have Mass vs. populum, Communion in the hand, altar girls, EMs, EP II, piano music…all in line with Rome’s teachings.

    Yes…Father Z is correct in that offering Holy Mass reverently is important.

    However, the reality is that until we deal with the root of the problem — the Novus Ordo itself — we will simply dance around the key issue regarding the Latin Church’s liturgical crisis.

    The crisis will end when our Pope and Latin bishops acknowledge that they we must phase out the Novus Ordo as we return to the TLM.

    But they will not do so.

    They are holy men who, unfortunately, are unable to acknowledge that Pope Paul VI made a terrible decision when he foisted the Nouvs Ordo upon the Latin Church…despite the fact that the majority of bishops at the 1967 Synod had rejected the Novus Ordo.

    A future Pope will return to the TLM. But until such time, the liturgical crisis will not cease.

    Pax.

  9. Prof. Basto says:

    A huge moment for the reform of the reform.

    Cardinal George is great. Ecce Sacerdos magnus!

    St. John Cantius is wonderful.

  10. Tom says:

    “But some pastors have understood these things all along. For years, even decades, they have worked – very much an uphill climb – to implement the Church’s liturgical changes and documents as they were written, in keeping with our heritage.”

    On the flip side, Father, other pastors also implemented Church documents as they were written…

    …which approved vernacular Masses, Communion in the hand, altar girls, novel Eucharistic Prayers, dreadful music, drums, guitars, pianos, EMs, Mass vs. populum…

    …Church documents even allow for non-Catholics to serve as lectors.

    The problem is that the fine liturgy offered at St. John Cantius is in harmony with Church documents…and the Papal Mass offered at Nationals Stadium was also in harmony with Church documents.

    Mass that features Communion in the hand, altar girls…you know…so-called “liberal” Mass is also approved by Rome.

    Church documents allow for traditional Masses and “liberal” Masses.

    Therefore, while the priests at St. John Cantius offer Masses in one style, priests throughout the Latin Church are able to offer Masses that differ radically from Masses offered at St. John Cantius.

    That is the problem…official Church documents allow for Masses to be offered in styles that differ radically.

    That is why we had the Nationals Stadium Papal Mass (offered in perfect harmony with Church documents) compared to the Papal Mass offered at Yankee Stadium (also offered in harmony with Church documents).

    We have to face the reality that the liturgical crisis begins and ends with Rome’s promotion of traditional and non-traditional liturgy.

    Pax.

  11. Patrick says:

    Tom,

    You keep troting out the same, tired “end the Novus Ordo” everytime there is any thread like this. Far easier than ending it, would be to begin saying it like this Mass here…problem solved. And such a thing is happening now. More and more newly ordained priests are starting to say Mass like the pictures here.

    This is a terrific moment, and something we see being pushed by Cardinal George throughout his Archdiocese.

    It has been said that if the sexual abuse scandal had not happened, Cardinal George would quite possibly be Pope.

  12. TJM says:

    I was at Father Juncer’s First Mass, a Missa Solemnis in the Extraordinary Form and it was “extraordinary.” Tom

  13. Geoffrey says:

    Patrick,

    Thank you for saying what I have been thinking! :-)

  14. EJ says:

    Very well put Patrick!

  15. I’ll bet Fr. Pfleger was not the guest preacher!

  16. Yes, Tom, because the documents of Vatican II promote Altar girls, Communion in the hand and puppet Masses. (sarcastic remark)

    Seriously though you are forgetting the one principle, all Church documnts are supposed to be interpreted in line with Tradition. This madness maybe “acceptabe” by the “documets” but anything that’s contrary to Tradiiton isn’t inline with the interprtation of a Church document, but I know you already know this :)

  17. Phillip says:

    Tom: I had the great privilege to attend Holy Mass at St. John Cantius this year on the Feast of the Ascension. The Mass was the novus ordo in Latin (my schedule for the weekend could not include the TLM). This Mass was the most solemn, uplifting, reverent beautiful celebration of the Holy Sacrifice I have ever attended, including papal masses I have attended at St. Peter’s in Rome. The only parts said in English were the readings, the homily, and the prayers of intercession. The music was beautiful, the church is beautifully restored, and the people of this parish are lucky to have a wonderful pastor who is restoring the sacred.

  18. Tom: Your incessant negativity is tiresome.

    Abuses are not enshrined in the Church’s documents. People with their own ideas impose abuses.

    The TLM can be abused. The Extraordinary Form can be celebrated in an appallingly sloppy and scandalous way.

    If your sole purpose here is the run down the Novus Ordo, your comments will be deleted.

  19. Tom needs to start his own blog and stop going on and on in Fr. Zuhlsdorf’s comment box.

  20. Jacques says:

    Yes, let’s be more positive:
    Today, monday June 2nd 2008 at 6:30 PM, I attended the 2nd TLM celebrated by our parish priest Fr Bernard Lucchesi in La Bedoule-in-Provence’s parochial church. Great!
    Only 6 people attended the first mass. Now there were 30 faithfuls.
    Cheers.

  21. Transitional Deacon says:

    This is a slight tangent: does anyone know where it is possible to purchase the orphrey used on those chasubles? I don’t think La Lame carries it. I would like to get this orphrey for a chasuble I am having made.

    Hope someone can help!

  22. Oliver says:

    This continuous stream of modern liturgies, with or without Latin, is becoming a dog’s dinner. Having attended the Brompton Oratory in London, more for curiosity than anything else, one sees a departmental store approach to church events with congregations, priests and parish life fragmented with little to connect them. In fact, there is a rivalry mentality with most resources going to modern services that include sweet little girlie shows in red. Why they have to be dressed in red only God knows. The austere side of events is reserved for solitary priests saying the old Mass which continues to attract people of all ages, dressed politely and quietly composed apart from the odd baby. In contrast, the Novus Ordo crowd are noisy affairs with people dressed for some wild entertainment. I have complained often about liturgical hybridisation but I now realise that the two mentalities will never converge. The conciliar popes have decided where they want to lead the Church; the laity will decide by voting with their feet …. and money.

  23. Patrick says:

    Oliver,

    I suggest you visit Chicago and St. John Cantius. There you will see a parish that is clearly ONE parish. The Masses look and feel the same. The same priests say both forms, wearing the same style vestments, accompanied by the same music. On any given Sunday there will be a low EF Mass, an English OF Mass, a Latin OF Mass, and an EF Solemn High Mass. The two forms complement each other and display the deep richness of our Catholic Faith.

  24. jacobus says:

    Patrick,

    I don’t know about “problem solved.” As Fr. Z has put many times, there are problems with the texts/calender of the Novus Ordo (remember the Pentecost rant?). That said, if every Novus Ordo mass was celebrated like this, it would be a HUGE leap forward. Very beautiful.

  25. I suspect that if Mass had been celebrated in this manner, and as it was after the Council for so many years at St. Agnes in St. Paul and the Brompton Oratory in London, most people would no longer have been terribly interested in the older form of Mass.

  26. RichR says:

    I like the sanctuary with the big, beautiful, old high altar being used instead of an “ironing board in the sanctuary” type of approach. I don’t mean to denigrate the holiness of an altar of sacrifice, but when the invisible magnificence of the sacrifice is not reflected in the visible magnificence of the altar, then something is wrong.

    As far as all the liturgical aberrations out there, I’d just like to say this, “When can we start having Mass with more norms than indults/options/innovations?” Altar girls are allowed, but they aren’t the encouraged norm. EMHC’s are just that, extraordinary. Communion in the Hand, vernacular throughout the Mass, no incense, Both Species, the Sign of Peace, Mass versus populum,…..all of these things are options or indults that dispense from the norms. Why not just go by norms instead of by exceptions?

  27. Tim from St. Agnes says:

    FYI: This Sunday the St. Agnes High School Concert Chorale will sing at St. John Cantius as part of thier concert tour

  28. Geoffrey says:

    Fr. Z said: “I suspect that it Mass had been celebrated in this manner, and as it was after the Council for so many years at St. Agnes in St. Paul and the Brompton Oratory in London, most people would no longer have been terribly interested in the older form of Mass.”

    I have long felt that way. I only want to go to Mass in the Extraordinary Form because I feel so “deprived”… if I had a Mass in the Ordinary Form to go to, one with some Latin and chant and where they “say the black and do the red”, I would be a very happy camper, and wouldn’t have been very interest in the “old” Mass.

  29. mary martha says:

    I should start by saying that I regularly attend Mass in the Extraordinary Form at St. John Cantius. I even took a few of the pictures in this post.

    If anyone is ever in Chicago it’s worth the time to visit St. John Cantius. Masses are offered in English and Latin, Extraordinary and Ordinary form … but they are all offered to the same community, and all are offered with an equally high level of reverence.

    There really isn’t a division between communities who attend the different Masses. Certainly not anymore than in my suburban parish where there are just different people who attend different times and so they are more familiar with their fellow 9:30 Mass attendees instead of the 6pm crowd.

  30. tara says:

    Exceptional pictures! The altar, room and priests all have a warm golden “glow.” Wow!

  31. Royce says:

    In many respects I believe Fr. Z is correct that if not for the abuse the old rite never would have come back, but it seems to me that we would have lost something in so doing. Though the loss of the liturgical beauty is an enormous setback to the Faith, I have begun to wonder if the beauty of the parts of the Mass we often do not appreciate might be just as great a loss. Here I’m thinking about the prayers at the foot of the altar, the Lavabo, the Last Gospel, the Offertory, and so forth. It just might be the case that losing these parts of the Mass was just as great a loss as chant, ad orientam, and Latin.

    I began to think about this when I took a fundamentalist friend of mine with a great knowledge of the Bible to Mass with me and found that what impressed him the most, despite a great appreciation on his part of the ars celebrandi, was the things I mentioned above. Thankfully, though, in the revival of the old rite we now have both.

  32. A Philadelphian says:

    Royce: That’s a really good point — I, too, think that the Lavabo and the Last Gospel are among the most beautiful elements of the TLM. Perhaps the “gravitational pull” will include a reintroduction of these elements into the NO?

    At any rate, St. John Cantius is a wonderful parish. I had the great delight of hearing Palm Sunday and Easter mass there last year — prayer, reverence, aesthetics, full participation — they have it all there.

  33. That parish has the NO ad orientem.
    It has classes. Like, Catechism and Latin and Greek.
    There are Latin classes for children.

    Fr.Z., shame on you for linking to that parish’s website. You are now the cause of my envy. My eyes have gone from their normal mid-brown to flaming, blazing green.

    BAH!

    (I’m not even really joking much. How come no parishes over here (==Europe) seem to want to teach their parishoners Latin and Greek?!?! Bah.)

  34. Maria says:

    Patrick, as far as looking and feeling the same, if they felt exactly the same, they would have to be the same, as it were. I attend the TLM Sundays. A few months ago, I got to go to St. Agnes. I certainly appreciated the gorgeous architecture, reminded me of Rome. And the vestments, incense, bells were just as fine as the ones “back home” in my TLM church. But, the N.O. Latin Mass did not “feel the same” to me. I think the biggest difference is that the priest goes through the Canon silently, but when he comes to the Consecration, he is required by the rubrics to pronounce it audibly. “Nit-picking” you may say, but this makes a big difference in the “feel” of the Mass, since the most important moment is accompanied by speech, rather than silence as the TLM.

  35. Royce says:

    @Maria: Your comment reminds me a lot of Mosebach’s chapter on “Revealing through veiling” in his Heresy of Formlessness. Definitely worth a read, and he explains the concept very well.

    @Philly: Thank you. There has been quite a bit of talk about re-introducing these elements as options in the new missal. I’ve also heard of priests using the old missal’s prayers at the incensations (I’ve heard tell that Arinze uses them, and people say you can sometimes see Benedict’s lips moving as he incenses the altar, probably saying the accompanying Psalm). And of course the priest can always say the Last Gospel back in the sacristy and do the vesting prayers as well. Adding in the prayers at the foot of the altar, though, would seem to be a much trickier task if one is to stay within the rubrics, though one might wonder if a CDW under Msgr. Ranjith might grant an indult for doing so. I got the idea yesterday, though, that a priest could always use the prayers at the foot of the altar (minus the confiteor) in the sacristy before Mass as preparatory prayers with the altar servers. Anyways, this is precisely how I think of the ‘gravitational pull.’

  36. Connie says:

    “I suspect that if Mass had been celebrated in this manner, and as it was after the Council for so many years at St. Agnes in St. Paul and the Brompton Oratory in London, most people would no longer have been terribly interested in the older form of Mass.”

    Bingo! Bingo Father. I attended Mass regularly at St. John Cantius when I lived in Chicago and I LOVED the Novus Ordo in Latin, as it was intended and written. To be honest, and yes this may scandalize many readers, I prefered the Latin Novus Ordo to the TLM. I truly did. I love hearing the scripture read in English.

    In my opinion, if it, the Novus Ordo, was done ad orientum and in Latin, as it was written, and celebrated so reverently as the priest of St. John Cantius do, nobody would even miss the TLM. I assure you.

    I LOVE Fr. Phillips! God bless him and all the Canons Regular!

  37. JML says:

    Fr Z.

    I read your commentary on the FSSP ordination (EF) and if I remember correctly, only the new priests may concelebrate with the Bishop. And, because of this, this is one of the few (only?) times the Canon is recited aloud?

    However, in the OF, we can have all the priests (new and old) concelebrate with the Bishop?

    Though I prefer TLM, I went to an OF Mass in Madison, WI. It was an older church complete with the altar rail and the old Main Altar. I may be crazy, but does the “holiness” of the building encourage a more reverant celebration of the OF?

    I probably have not said it right, but if you have a modern Church that looks like a concrete box with a table in the middle does it tend one to be more “informal” than a Church that looks, well, like a Church?

  38. Piers-the-Ploughman says:

    Like Royce I am very glad the TLM is here again, even with a beautiful NO. It could well be true that if the NO was like the mass at St John Cantius, the TLM would have been lost forever. But then, those elements such as the prayers at the foot of the altar, the last Gospel, silent canon, the Leonine prayers, Asperges would be gone also.

  39. Geoffrey says:

    I agree with Connie 110%!

  40. Michael B. says:

    Patience, everyone. I think we can accommodate Tom’s grumpiness. You don’t know his circumstances, he may be in a very ugly diocese without much good going on. Let him vent among friends. If he sticks around here, he’ll learn the truth eventually. This is a good place for him to be.
    Even in the best of circumstances, I have learned to be very dissatisfied with the OF’s distortions of our ancient patrimony of prayer. Even so, I am thrilled to see the wonderful corrective of tradition applied to the OF. Let there be more!

  41. Tom says:

    \”Seriously though you are forgetting the one principle, all Church documnts are supposed to be interpreted in line with Tradition. This madness maybe “acceptabe” by the “documets” but anything that’s contrary to Tradiiton isn’t inline with the interprtation of a Church document, but I know you already know this\”

    The post-Vatican II Popes have approved the documents that permit Communion in the hand, altar girls, novel Eucharistic Prayers, non-Catholics to serve as lectors, EMs…and so forth.

    The point is that liturgies offered at St. John Cantius are in line with that which the post-Vatican II Popes have taught…

    …while so-called \”liberal\” liturgies that feature altar girls, Communion in the hand, EMs, etc., are also in line with that which the post-Vatican II Popes have taught.

    Said liturgies are also offered in reverent fashion.

    Therefore, it’s misleading to suggest that St. John Cantius priests offer Mass in harmony with Church documents while additional liturgical styles are not in harmony with Church documents.

    Certain conservatives refuse to face the reality that \”liberal\” liturgies are also in harmony with Church documents.

    That is my point.

  42. TJM says:

    I believe Father Z is making a really fine point concerning the Novus Ordo as it is celebrated at St. John Cantius and the Brompton Oratory, where I have been privileged to attend Holy Mass. In both of these Churches, the way the Novus Ordo is celebrated, in Latin, ad orientem, with splendid music, vestments and careful attention to the rubrics, one can more readily see the continuity between the EF and OF. Intuitively, you see that this was probably what Sacrosanctum Concilium (other than the multiple Eucharistic Prayers) intended. But St. John Cantius’s Novus Ordo in Latin evolved over time. The original Novus Ordo in Latin I attended there was celebrated versus populum. Although I greatly enjoyed the Latin and the wonderful music, an element was definitely missing. But then it happened. Father Phillip and his priests made the marvelous decision, based on sound liturgical principles, to return to the ancient practice of celebrating Mass ad orientem. That’s when the Novus Ordo in Latin clicked for me and I developed a greater appreciation for the OF. Although I love the EF, I now can see the wisdom and beauty of the OF. Tom

  43. Michael B. says:

    Tom,
    I was just going to say this:
    For you overly-optimistic types, keep in mind that if the new liturgy was intended by Bugnini et al to be celebrated in a traditional manner, we would have seen it done that way in Rome long before the blessed Papacy of Benedict XVI. If you want to see a liturgy closer to what most of the fathers of Vatican II intended, then take a look at the Missal of 1965. What we are seeing now is the corrective of tradition applied to a liturgy that can be legitimately celebrated in a very untraditional manner indeed.
    So go easy on Tom.

  44. Tom says:

    “Tom: Your incessant negativity is tiresome. Abuses are not enshrined in the Church’s documents. People with their own ideas impose abuses.”

    What you define as “negativity” is not so in my mind. I am an extremely positive Catholic. [You have not yet demonstrated that view. – Fr. Z]

    Father, I don’t know your biography. But I have experienced the collapse of the Latin Church. If I were a negative person, I would have followed the lead of 80 percent of Catholics who have abandoned the Mass.

    It is my belief that the Latin Church will recover from Her liturgical collapse that fuels my desire to remain within the Church to help advance orthodoxy.

    That said…Father, you said that abuses are not enshrined in Church documents.

    Actually, Father, didn’t the novel practice of altar girls begin as a liturgical abuse…same with Communion in the hand and novel Eucharistic Prayers? [Male service remains the juridical norm, and wretched service by boys was and is entirely possible in any Mass.]

    At any rate, Father, here’s my point:

    The liturgies offered at St. John Cantius are reverent and in line with Church documents.

    Conversely, liturgies vs. populum that feature Communion in the hand, altar girls, drums and pianos, liturgical music that you and I likely find dreadful, and so forth… [Communion in the hand also remains, juridically, an exception, and horrible music can be played on any instrument at any Mass, TLM or NO.]

    …you know, Father, what many conservative Catholics label as “liberal” Masses…

    …are also in perfect harmony with Church documents.

    Correct, Father?

    That is the reality, Father. Correct?

    Church documents actually allow for liturgies that are all over the map…from traditional liturgies to the style of Mass held a few weeks ago at Nationals Stadium?

    Correct, Father? [I’ll tell you what. Getting in my face on my blog is not the best way to be able to post here.]

    Father, that is reality and the problem…and until Rome decides that normative Mass will either be St. John Cantius style or “liberal” style, we will not end the liturgical crisis.

    Now, what did I just say that is “negative”? What did I just say that isn’t the truth? Somebody please tell me. Thank you.

    Pax.

  45. Michael B. says:

    Hey Tom, it’s ok, I got your back. Relax, you really are among friends.

  46. Jordanes says:

    I’m no fan of big cities, but these photos have me wondering if maybe I could move to Chicago. Thanks for sharing them, Father.

  47. Michael B. says:

    I hear St. John Cantius has a beautiful Polish style Church in Lawton, MI too, just west of Kalamazoo, for anyone in that area. Ah, it is great to be Polish!

  48. Jordanes says:

    Yes, the Polish people make beautiful churches — some of the most stunningly beautiful church interiors I’ve ever seen, and the exteriors are usually pretty nice too.

  49. Matt Q says:

    Tom wrote:

    “I agree with Father Z that offering Holy Mass reverently is important, but there is far more than that regarding the Latin Church’s liturgical crisis.

    The Nationals Stadium Papal Mass was offered reverently.

    Mass is offered reverently at my parish and parishes that I have visited throughout my diocese.

    We have Mass vs. populum, Communion in the hand, altar girls, EMs, EP II, piano music…all in line with Rome’s teachings.

    Yes…Father Z is correct in that offering Holy Mass reverently is important.

    However, the reality is that until we deal with the root of the problem—the Novus Ordo itself—we will simply dance around the key issue regarding the Latin Church’s liturgical crisis.

    The crisis will end when our Pope and Latin bishops acknowledge that they we must phase out the Novus Ordo as we return to the TLM.

    But they will not do so.

    They are holy men who, unfortunately, are unable to acknowledge that Pope Paul VI made a terrible decision when he foisted the Nouvs Ordo upon the Latin Church…despite the fact that the majority of bishops at the 1967 Synod had rejected the Novus Ordo.

    A future Pope will return to the TLM. But until such time, the liturgical crisis will not cease.

    Pax.”

    )(

    I agree with you entirely, Tom, although I don’t foresee the Novus Ordo going anywhere anytime soon. I believe, therefore, the Novus Ordo needs reforming. This means writing into the Novus Ordo’s GIRM a strict and exact formulae like the Tridentine Mass. It WILL consist of this, WILL NOT have any of that, etc.

    Yes, the liturgical crisis will continue until at least some sort of limitations are put on the free-for-all-isms now at play with Novus Ordo. I pity Paul VI lamenting the fact the smoke of Satan has entered the Sanctuary, but as history has proven, he was the one who opened the door and let it in.

  50. Matt Q says:

    As I am very much pleased with Summorum Pontificum and the spread of the Tridentine Mass, I am also hopeful the Novus Ordo can be reformed. We can see how the Holy Father is celebrating Mass and how his altars are presented. That said, it needs to go farther than just that. We know many parishes are beginning to arrange their altars “a la Benoit,” but it needs to go beyond merely being inspired by what the Holy Father does. I think gentle nudges are needed, not just copycatting. What kinds of nudging will occur, I defer to the Holy Father although I do have a few ideas of my own. LOL ;)

  51. Raya says:

    I may be wrong but I think that Fr. Phillips initially wanted a bi-ritual order but could not at that time because of the sui juris nature of the other 20 plus Catholic Churches in the Catholic Church (all in union with Rome)–I know there are Byzantine Fransiscans (although the ones that raise the German Sheperd dogs became Orthodox).
    I thought that was interesting as some of the aesthetic issues are also addressed in Eastern Rite (and Orthodox) liturgies.
    It also came to mind because of the Romanian Bishop taking communion. I think Fr Phillips may even be bi-ritual.

  52. Ole Doc Farmer says:

    I had the honor of attending Fr. Rice’s first Mass. Amazing. The schola of the Canons Regular chanted almost all of the Mass (chant was interspersed with Tallis’s Missa a 4). What I heard MUST be what/is Gregorian Chant was intended to be.

  53. Phil says:

    Connie:

    I think you may be a little exuberant when you write “I assure you” after
    making such a bold statement:
    ” In my opinion, if it, the Novus Ordo, was done ad orientum and in Latin, as it was written, and celebrated so reverently as the priest of St. John Cantius do, nobody would even miss the TLM. ”

    I fact, I can ASSURE you that your statement is incorrect, since I personally know of at least one person, I, who would miss the Usus Antiquior. Please remember that the negation of
    for all x, P(x)
    is
    there exists at least one x, ~P(x)
    where ~ denotes “not”, the negation operator.

    In my view at least, removing the Last Gospel was not only an error, but a fault.
    Whether I am right or wrong regarding this matter is besides the point here — but it suffices to disprove your statement.

    In Domino
    Phil

    Phil

  54. Michael Gormally says:

    If the Ordination Mass was in the Ordinary Form, why did the deacons raise the Cardinal Archbishop’s chasuble at the Elevation?

  55. Prof. Basto says:

    If the Ordination Mass was in the Ordinary Form, why did the deacons raise the Cardinal Archbishop’s chasuble at the Elevation?

    Because that’s not forbidden in the OF, and the spirit of a salutary reform of the reform is to do everything that is not explicitly forbidden for the OF as it would be done in the EF, the “Form of Ages”.

  56. Michael: If the Ordination Mass was in the Ordinary Form, why did the deacons raise the Cardinal Archbishop’s chasuble at the Elevation?

    This practice is not a rubrical matter — that is, I don’t see it mentioned in the 1962 rubrics — so as a gesture of respect it might seem equally appropriate in either form. And it appears to be a common practice in “high” ordinary form Masses (as rare as they may be).

  57. Henry: It is in the rubrics of the 1962MR, in the Ritus servandus in celebratione Missae, that the deacon slightly lift hem of the chasuble: … diaconus accedit ad eius [sacerdotis] dexteram, et ibi in superiori gradu altaris genuflexus, cvm Sacramentum elevatur, fimbrias planeta elevat….

  58. Father Z: Thanks. I’d only glanced quickly through the Rubricae generales Missalis romani.

  59. Micah says:

    I am parishioner of St. John Cantius and just wanted to pop in a say that if you are ever anywhere near Chicago you owe it to yourself to assist at the TLM Mass there (really, all of their Masses are great but I love the TLM the most). The schedule is on their website. Also, be advised that the Cannons Regular also run St. Peter’s in Volo, Wi. and St. Anne’s in Lawton, Mi.

  60. I am a parishioner at St. Peter Parish, in Volo, IL, the other parish administered by the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius. I feel privileged to have been able to attend this mass, and I feel even moreso that one of the two new priests will be my new associate pastor.

    Thanks for posting these photos, Fr. Z. And thanks to the Cantians for restoring to me what should have been my birthright as a Catholic.

  61. Lacrimarum Valle says:

    The photograph of the Elevation of the Host is stunning and beautiful.

    Thank you.

  62. Michael J says:

    I agree with virtually everyone here that the Church would be much better if the Novus Ordo mass were celebrated as it should be. What I find quite interesting is how most define “as it should be”. Everyone seems to want a return of Latin, Sacred Chant and Polyphony and an elimination of exceptions to the norms (that started out as abuses) and a return to strict norms. Some suggest, with no objections and quite a few agreements, that the re-introduction of elements that were (incorrectly?, imprudently?, regretably?) removed such as the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar would be a good idea. Elimination of “problematic” Prefaces and reintroduction of older Prefaces is advocated by many, and a return to a saner calendar (celebrate Ascention Thursday on Thursday) also seems to be the goal.

    In short, once the reform of the Novus Ordo is complete, the Church will celebrate …. the Tridentine rite. Why not go for the brass ring and advocate that the Church exclusively use the ancient and venerable rite?

  63. T. Falter says:

    I can assure Connie that she is quite mistaken in her assurance. From the beginning there were objections to the new form of the Mass, even in its pure, Latin form. The (Cardinal) Ottaviani Intervention of 1969 is one famous example. http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1969ottoviani.html . Let us not forget that the Holy Father has referred to it as a “banal on-the-spot product” http://www.latin-mass-society.org/ratzshow.htm . He seems to have meant the text itself and not just the abuses.

    There’s more at stake than just the overall feel of the way the Mass is celebrated. The removal and devaluing of so many prayers from the ancient rite makes the newer form to be objectively less beautiful even with all the “smells and bells,” as welcome as they are in today’s context. It’s akin to taking a beautiful Rembrandt painting and erasing a figure here and smearing some brush strokes there. Sure, it can still be beautiful, but not nearly as much as it was before it was defaced.

    Shouldn’t we give God the best we are capable of giving?

    I have assisted at Latin celebrations of the OF at St. John Cantius, and I couldn’t help but to be startled by the major differences in the text of the Mass itself. They were quite jarring. But I’m thankful for what the Canons of SJC are doing, and I pray that their efforts help pave the way for the full restoration of the ancient rite of the Mass, and, eventually, the restoration of Christendom. We live in interesting times.

  64. Michael J’s comment leads me to a question: what are the objective differences between the Tridentine Mass and Novus Ordo? Beyond ad orientem/versus popul[o|um] (sorry, don’t know which case), beyond the question of the vernacular, beyond the not-always-great way feast days can be shifted in the NO.

    Is it the second reading on Sundays? The possibility to hear the Eucharistic Prayer (even if only in a low voice)? The liturgy of the Word shared by the celebrant and the people at the same time? Concelebration? What motivates these real differences?

    I’m not actually sure that Michael J’s penultimate sentence is right: In short, once the reform of the Novus Ordo is complete, the Church will celebrate …. the Tridentine rite. I think the differences between the Novus Ordo and the TLM are more than just abuses. Comparing the two with the Novus Ordo in the state it seems to be in so often is unfair – the only fair comparison would be between a “clean” TLM and a “clean” NO.

  65. M Kr says:

    Does anyone know where the canons sit during the singing of the hours of the Divine Office? There aren’t choir stalls in the chancel.

  66. M Kr says:

    Piers-the-Plowman:

    Somebody can correct me if I’m wrong, but the Asperges can also be done before the O.F. Mass on Sundays. Also, the Leonine Prayers are not part of the Mass and are now optional, even in the E.F. Mass.

  67. Royce says:

    M Kr,

    Yes, the Asperges may be done, but as one of the options for the “Penitential Rite.” In such case, the Kyrie is not sung.

    Also, great to hear that Tallis was sung at one of the First Masses. He should be used much more often! (Especially in the English-speaking world)

  68. mary martha says:

    “Does anyone know where the canons sit during the singing of the hours of the Divine Office? There aren’t choir stalls in the chancel.”

    They sit in the first few pews of the Church.

  69. Paul Stokell says:

    Father, thanks so much for the pictures and the info. I fondly remember Fr. Rice during his time at St. Mary’s at Roland Park in Baltimore. He will make an excellent and caring priest and I wish him and his brother ordinand all the best!

  70. Habemus Papam says:

    A “high” NO in latin is beautiful and transcendant compared to the average “low” NO. However there are significant diffences with the TLM, most importantly the Offertory the Oblation of the Host and Chalice which is replaced in the NO by the Preparation of Gifts and the deficencies in the 1st Eucharistic Prayer compared to the traditional Roman Canon, a minimalist sacrifice devoid of the repeated references to the pure host, a holy sacrifice and unspotted victim. If the truely Catholic elements of the Offertory and Canon were inserted into the Novus Ordo we would have an undoubted Holy Sacrifice returned to our altars.

  71. M Kr says:

    It would be nice if choir stalls were built eventually for the canons.

  72. Hopelessly Traditional says:

    It would be nice if choir stalls were built eventually for the canons.
    Comment by M Kr — 4 June 2008 @ 3:04 pm

    The church was built as a Polish parish church rather than as a collegiate church for a religious order. The sanctuary is wide and shallow (that is, the distance from altar to communion rail is limited). There’s really no space for choir stalls or for a proper “choir” space as is found in monastic churches. Perhaps you meant choir stalls in the nave? Certainly choir stalls could be built but the still would not face each other, rather, would have to have the same orientation as the first few rows of pews–unless, one removed a half dozen rows of pews, but then a lot of space would be wasted at the sides and the first rows of pew would be too far distant from the sanctuary. It’s just not very possible to transform a church designed for a parish alone into a monastic church.

    In one sense, it’s not so bad that the canons occupy the front pews for chanting the hours. No, they can’t face each other, but parishioners who attend, occupying the pews behind them, are oriented the same way so that the Office, befitting a religious order dedicated to pastoral ministry, unites people and canons in the same action, rather than the religious sitting in a “choir” (which does not exist) or chancel becoming performers to the eyes of spectators in the nave.