Meeting on “miracle” attributed to Card. Newman?

I found this on Catholic Culture:

Beatification of Cardinal Newman: decision tomorrow?
September 29, 2008

A Vatican panel examining the healing of a Massachusetts man will meet tomorrow to rule on whether the cure, attributed the intercession of Cardinal John Henry Newman, is miraculous, reported the Daily Mail. (The Vatican has not confirmed the schedule, and an official announcement would probably come only when the Pope approves the formal decree, but the report appears accurate.)

FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in SESSIUNCULA. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Meeting on “miracle” attributed to Card. Newman?

  1. Thomas says:

    The Massachusetts man is a permanent deacon.

  2. Memphis Aggie says:

    How on earth do you make such a determination? I’m sure there must be standards of evidence and procedure.

  3. Memphis: The procedure is extremely complicated.

    At first all sorts of evidence must be gathered, everything that pertains. Records, witnesses testimony, etc. It must be collected in the right procedure laid down by law. Then, once everything is gathered, it is sent to Rome and the next phase begins. In Rome the evidence is examined scientifically and theologically. The science dimension must show that what happened cannot be explained by physical or natural causes. In the case of a healing, it must be proven that the healing was sudden, complete and enduring. Theologically it must be shown to have occurred in conjunction with prayer to the person in question, and that there are spiritual effects as well in the life of the person or persons. There are panels of experts which examine all these arguments for or against these points. Finally, they give their decisions, yay or nay, and then it goes to the members of the Congregation, cardinals and bishops, who listen to everything, just as in a court case, and vote. After that, the decision goes to the Holy Father, who accepts it or not.

    That is a very simplified explanation. I can assure you that this is an extremely rigorous process!

  4. Memphis Aggie says:

    Thank you Father,

    I’m reassured by the rigor of the process