Interesting news from Rome

As you probably know I am in Rome right now.  I will be heading back to the USA via London early next week.

During my all too brief Roman sojourn, I have been catching up with people and news.

One of the very interesting things I have learned is that the Pontifical North American College, the seminary where most of the men from the USA live and receive their spiritual formation, is going to be … wait for it…

training seminarians to celebrate also using the 1962 Missale Romanum.
 
We will need to see what exactly is going to be done in this regard, of course.   But if this actually happens it is a matter of real joy.

It may be that many of the men so trained will not either want or need to celebration the older form of Mass.  Fine.

However, by learning about it, rather… by learning it, they will have much deeper insight into what saying Mass as a priest of the Roman Rite is all about.  Coupled with their years in Rome, they will be shaped as "priests for the third millennium", as the former NAC rector and present Archbishop of Milwaukee called them in his book.

Pope Benedict’s Motu Proprio is principally for priests.  It underscores their rights.  In this Summorum Pontificum stands alone.  

The provisions aim especially to spark a rebuilding of the Church’s identity, especially through creating continuity in our liturgical practice with our deep past and traditions. 

We must reinvigorate our Catholic identity from within, so that we have something by which we can shape the whole world.  Priests form the people who form the world. 

Thus, priests must be well formed. 

Use of the older Mass will have a powerful effect on the way younger priests see their priesthood, how they celebrate Mass, and therefore how lay people see the priest’s priesthood and what they understand Mass is in their lives.

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52 Responses to Interesting news from Rome

  1. Richard says:

    Oh ho! Well said, Fr. Z!

  2. Nick says:

    This is GREAT NEWS!

    Let them see FOR THEMSELVES whether they want the TLM and stop letting them get their “information” about it second hand. It is very clear that many will in fact welcome this opportunity, and, thanks be to God, will be prepared when they come home to America.

    The problem of whether a bishop will consider a priest “qualified” enough will be a non issue if the priest says he learned it as part of his regular formation!

  3. Matthew Mattingly says:

    This is wonderful news if true.
    Now if only there could be a movement in Rome to have seminarians studying for the priesthood at various seminaries wear their national cassocks for each of the Pontifical colleges again.
    A friend of mine says that today, next to no seminarians (except for the Legionaries of Christ and a few others) wear their cassocks/soutanes on the streets of Rome….most slum around in layclothes. That’s a shame.
    But the monastic Orders seminarians are having a resurgance of wearing the habit whereas 20 years ago they all wore layclothes too.
    My Dad was in Rome in the 1950’s, and took many movies, some of which show seminarians in St.Peter’s Square waving at Pius XII in his apartment window for the Angelus. The German/Teutonic seminarians are easy to spot in their red soutanes and black sashes. But there are some wearing dark purple, while others wear the standard black.
    In some of those old movies there were so many various habits for nuns in Rome, it’s a shame to know that that is all gone. Really colorful and unique habits. No reason to discard them. THey really added to the color, and the “Catholicity” of Rome.
    Maybe the Pope will come out with a document urging a return to this as well. I wouldn’t doubt it too much.

  4. Jim McM says:

    In two of the indult mass sites in the Washington, DC, area, seminarians often appear in cassocks. I passed two last Sunday hurrying down the street from a Metro stop, almost at the church. I suspect however, that I see the same 2-3 repeatedly at these churches. Nonetheless, it is a hopeful sign.

  5. Father Anonymous says:

    I have to admit (not very long ordained myself) that I really am surprised and impressed how fast some seminaries are moving with this. Most seminaries have more or less stabilized theologically, however (and the NAC is the ultimate example of this) there is frequently a political spirit that calls the shots and favors “French cuff moderates” as the ideal finished product. And if they have one of the most important skills of all, soccer skills, you can almost perceive the invisible mitre akin to the invisible stigmata of St. Catherine!

    But I digress. the NAC has not even been able to completely restore the use of the cassock, although the majority of seminarians are desirous, because some of the liberal bishops who send to the seminary would 1) freak out, and 2) pull out of the seminary.

    This certainly is good news though. In my diocese, many of the flower children (now wilting) who went there in the 60s and 70s are under the impression that it is still “cutting edge” as it was in their days. I suppose that it is “cutting edge” now but in a slightly different way! I’d love to see their reaction when they open the alumni magazine and gaze upon pictures of an “Extraordinary” practicum being conducted! All the carbonara and saltimbocca in the world won’t be able calm them down.

  6. PNP, OP says:

    Another significant test for S.P. will come when mainline religious orders like my own, the O.P.’s, include an ordination in their respective constitutions ordering studia to provide training in the Extraordinary Form. As it stands, we “exhort” provinces to require Latin, Greek, and Hebrew and “ordain” that students learn two of the three official languages of the Order (English, French, Spanish). Our ratio studiorum now is so jammed packed with one and two credit courses on social analysis, cultural diversity, women’s issues, ad nau that I’m not entirely sure where we would stick yet another practica. Also, it can take upwards of nine years to revise a ratio.

    Fr. Z, I know that several American Dominican provinces are preparing statements on S.P. Watch for them!

    Fr. Philip, OP

  7. PNP, OP says:

    I need to point out–rather quickly–that the Order has a ratio and each province has a ratio that fulfills locally the requirements of the Order’s ratio. This means that a province can tailor its ratio to fit local needs; so, for example, not all provinces have the one and two credit courses I mention above…

    Fr. Philip, OP

  8. Momentous news.
    I remember being invited on occasion to lunch at the North American College in Rome many years ago.
    The Rector was a Msgr. Darcy.
    The hospitality was always excellent. (As was the food.)
    I seem to remember the seminarians of the college had their own distinctive cassock, but it was rarely worn, and I can’t remember the details.
    Can anyone enlighten me ?

    These sound like exciting times for N.A.C. students, and hopeful times for the Church.

  9. Rob says:

    Fr. Z-

    Most of the men preparing for priesthood for the dioceses of the U.S. are formed in the U.S. and not at the NAC. They have roughly 160 sems according to their website. Mount Saint Mary’s in Maryland alone has about the same number and it’s second to Mundelein in enrollment. Overall, the NAC is the exception, not the rule since there are over 3,400 men in formation for this country.

  10. Fr. John says:

    This is good news. I cannot help but think that seminarian formation in the Extraordinary form is going to be the inevitable trend. Since the the TLM is now a expression of the one Roman Rite, how can a seminary claim to properly train its students with out it. Fortunately time is on the side of the TLM. I was asked this past week about the TLM “controversy” by one of my RCIA folks, I responded that, “Since the Extraordinary form is now a formal expression of the Roman Rite, I would be remiss if I did not learn it, since I am a priest of the Roman Rite it would be irresponsible of me if I did not. Praying the Mass is the consummate expression of my priesthood why on earth would I not welcome another beautiful and profound expression of the love that the Lord has given to His Church.” It is my prayer that bishops of dioceses and rectors of seminaries realize this point.

  11. Steve says:

    I would have to disagree that the SP is “principally for priests”. (Although I don’t deny that it is very significant for priests)

    I would argue that it’s principally for the laity inasmuch as it defines our rights to the traditional Mass. Want it, ask the pastor. If he says no, go to the bishop. Stone wall, then write to Rome.

    While it clearly grants certain rights to priests (as opposed to, say, bishops) the whole thrust is towards lay access to — indeed a lay RIGHT to — the traditional Mass and sacraments.

  12. RBrown says:

    Another significant test for S.P. will come when mainline religious orders like my own, the O.P.’s, include an ordination in their respective constitutions ordering studia to provide training in the Extraordinary Form.
    Fr. Philip, OP

    Are you referring to the Dominican Rite?

  13. Hugh says:

    Have to agree with Steve – as I scrolled down the posts, I felt, “I’ve got to say …” but Steve said it.

    That aside, this is great news indeed for Catholic priests and laity.

    Thanks, Fr. Z.

  14. RBrown says:

    I need to point out—rather quickly—that the Order has a ratio and each province has a ratio that fulfills locally the requirements of the Order’s ratio. This means that a province can tailor its ratio to fit local needs; so, for example, not all provinces have the one and two credit courses I mention above…
    Fr. Philip, OP

    Those one and two credit social blah-blah-blah courses are an American phenomenon–the US is the only place that has “Formation Programs”. The Euros generally have too much common sense for such nonsense.

  15. RBrown says:

    In my experience the NACers always wore clerical clothes to class.

    BTW, the Rector of NAC, Msgr Checchio, was a classmate.

  16. TNCath says:

    This will certainly debunk the idea perpetrated by the bishops of the U.S. that most priests are not adequately trained to celebrate the extraordinary form. Just think, all those newly ordained priests taking and passing with flying colors Bishop Trautman’s Mass exam!

  17. Phillip says:

    Interesting. And while this is great news for NAC, over at the another seminary – the Josephenum – there is a huge crackdown on traditional-minded seminarians with some of them being kicked out these past few weeks over small transgressions. It is my understanding that the atmosphere there is quite tense for any seminarian who is rightfully ordered and supportive of Summorum. I feel sorry for the seminarians there…

  18. RBrown says:

    Interesting. And while this is great news for NAC, over at the another seminary – the Josephenum – there is a huge crackdown on traditional-minded seminarians with some of them being kicked out these past few weeks over small transgressions. It is my understanding that the atmosphere there is quite tense for any seminarian who is rightfully ordered and supportive of Summorum. I feel sorry for the seminarians there…
    Comment by Phillip

    As I wrote earlier, if that is true, then St Louis is a good option.

  19. Henricus says:

    As I wrote earlier, if that is true, then St Louis is a good option.

    In the case of a diocesan seminarian whose bishop sent him to the Josephenum, I wonder what difficulty if any there might be in his exercising this or another “option”. Is the option viable in all cases?

  20. Mathew Mattingly says:

    I’m not surprised at the extreme hostility towards the Motu Proprio and the TLM (and any Catholic tradition) at the Josphinium. Were they not among the most bizarre, and most radical of liberal seminaries ( including a very high proportion of openly gay priest/faculty and seminarians?)
    I think so. I remember stories of such type.

    I am happy to hear that a very good percentage of the NAC seminarians are desirious to restore their traditional national cassock, which I think was a black cassock, blue sash, and red piping on the collar. I know the German/Hungarian college had the red cassocks and black sash, the Scots College cassocks were dark violet/ purple (there probably are not any seminarians there anymore !), the Belgian seminarians wore a shade of ash/blue, and the Italian Pontifical Roman Major Seminary also wore purple cassocks, but of a shade similar to Monsignors etc. Most of the other national colleges wore the black soutane, with variations here and there. (The Ethiopian College wore white sashes).
    Too bad all this is gone….but might be back again before too long.

  21. Mark says:

    Matthew,

    I know Seminarians at the Scots College who still wear their violet cassocks with the red sash.

    Mark

  22. Julie Michelle says:

    I have heard positive rumours re: English seminaries too, but it’s too soon for them to be confirmed.

  23. Angelo says:

    Perhaps we can do a survey on the seminaries in Rome.
    Let’s begin with The Venerable English College (Bede)
    located on the Viale de S. Paulo; the seminary to which
    the bishops of England & Wales send their candidates.
    It also provides the English speaking world with these
    newly ordained once they obtain incardination.
    Why the the Venearable English College? I’ll let you
    figure that out.

  24. Mathew Mattingly says:

    I’m happy to hear that the Scots College Seminarinas still wear the distinctive violet cassock. Very beautiful. Now I hope they allow for the TLM at the seminary too.
    That would be wonderful if the TLM is taught to seminarians in Rome at the NAC and elsewhere. Whereelse is it better to learn the TLM than at the heart of the Church? I always was trhilled to hear stories from a family friend who was a priest who studied for the priesthood in the 1950’s. and related how many seminarians studying for Philadelphia Archdiocese under the late great Denis Cardinal Dougherty were often sent to Rome. At one time under him, there were close to 600 seminarians at the Archdiosecean seminary in Overbrook, Pa., and another 50 sent to Rome

  25. Andrew says:

    Fr. Philip, OP

    Our ratio studiorum now is so jammed packed with one and two credit courses on social analysis, cultural diversity, women’s issues, ad nau that I’m not entirely sure where we would stick yet another practica.

    There is some advice on this given in a certain Apostolic Constitution of fairly recent memory:

    “Wherever the study of Latin has suffered partial eclipse … there the traditional method of teaching this language shall be completely restored. Such is Our will, and there should be no doubt in anyone’s mind about the necessity of keeping a strict watch over the course of studies followed by Church students … Should circumstances demand the addition of other subjects then either the course of studies must be lengthened, or these additional subjects must be condensed or their study relegated to another time.”

  26. Andrew says:

    I should have mentioned that I am quoting from Veterum Sapientia of Bl. John XXIII.

  27. Bob says:

    ANGELO:
    The Venerable English College is in the centre of Rome, the Beda College on the Viale S.Paulo is also ran by the English Bishops but is a complety seperate institution, aimed primarily at older English candidates (it was initially for ex-Anglicans) and people from the Commonwealth countries. Traditionalism is not encouraged at either College though. Their staff hate the extraordinary form, cassocks, etc., although at lesat some of the students are interested.

  28. Nick says:

    Speaking of the Dominicans…I was told by some Dominicans that it was unclear whether SP applied to them or not. They said something about how the head of the Dominicans had the final say on whether they could use the TLM or not. They also said SP doesnt really apply to them because they have their own Dominican Rite (very similar to TLM) and it was never restricted.

  29. RBrown says:

    In the case of a diocesan seminarian whose bishop sent him to the Josephenum, I wonder what difficulty if any there might be in his exercising this or another “option”. Is the option viable in all cases?
    Comment by Henricus

    Can’t he just study for another diocese?

  30. Joshua says:

    Nick said “Speaking of the Dominicans…I was told by some Dominicans that it was unclear whether SP applied to them or not. They said something about how the head of the Dominicans had the final say on whether they could use the TLM or not. They also said SP doesnt really apply to them because they have their own Dominican Rite (very similar to TLM) and it was never restricted.”

    SP does apply to them, just as Quo Primum did. Every priest, without exception, of the Roman rite has the inherent right to use the TLM (in virtue of Quo Primum as clairified by the motu proprio) or the the new Mass. In addition Dominicans, because their rite was older than 200 yrs at the time of Quo Primum and because they chose to retain it, have a right to their own form of Mass, which currently is up to the regional superior. Hence the Dominican at our college has had permission to use the Dominican rite whenever, subject to his own prudence considering he is in the LA archdiocese and they might not like it too much. He also has the right as a Roman rite priest to say the standard Roman rite in either form. Hence our Dominican is now saying the Tridentine to avoid confusionas we transition to daily TLM Masses.

    Any Dominicans unsure of this should read Quo Primum.

  31. RBrown says:

    Speaking of the Dominicans…I was told by some Dominicans that it was unclear whether SP applied to them or not. They said something about how the head of the Dominicans had the final say on whether they could use the TLM or not. They also said SP doesnt really apply to them because they have their own Dominican Rite (very similar to TLM) and it was never restricted.
    Comment by Nick

    That sounds like a non problem.

    Summorum Pontifum refers to the Roman Missal promulgated by Pius V and re-issued by JXXIII. In the Missal the Apostolic Constitution (Quo Primum) permits use of rites at least 200 years old, e.g., Dominican, Carmelite, and Carthusian.

    But the question of whether the community mass in religious houses will habitually be of the old rite is for major superiors.

    Si singula communitas aut totum Institutum vel Societas tales celebrationes saepe vel plerumque vel permanenter perficere vult, res a Superioribus maioribus ad normam iuris et secundum leges et statuta particularia decernatur.

  32. Bernard of Arezzo says:

    Back to the NAC: this is good news, even though the numbers are small vis-a-vis the nation as a whole. Especially if we take the long view. Attending an academy (e.g. West Point) sets one up as ‘elite’ even amongst other officers (the phenomena of ring-knocking comes to mind)in the miliary, and I am told of something similar for alumini of the NAC. And just as many academy grads are in the higher ranks of the military, many bishops are alumni of the NAC. So, what the NAC does today, other seminaries will begin to follow tomorrow — or in 20-30 years, when the NAC seminarians today are bishops

  33. Parochus says:

    As an alumnus of the Pontifical North American College, I can say that the seminarians’ traditional “house cassock” was a black, European-cut soutane with blue piping and three blue buttons on the right side of the chest and three more buttons on each sleeve. It was gathered around the waist with a dark red sash. Although the cassock itself was black, the red sash, white collar and blue piping and buttons meant it was trimmed in the colors of the American flag. The cassock continues to be worn when the seminarians serve for the Pope and on other occasions.

  34. Mathew Mattingly says:

    As described, the NAC “house cassock” sounds like one of the more interesting. I hope its use grows, and becomes standard uniform for NAC seminarians once more.
    I always thought the German/Hungarian Colleges’ red cassock with black sash the most outstanding. I remember reading how they discarded it after WWII, and the Roman civilians of the city protested so strongly for its return, that the College gave in and brought it back.
    The aged hippy priests who run these seminaries in Rome, and would prefer slumming around in jeans and a clergy shirt rather than wearing the traditional cassock of their college are mentally living in the 1960’s still. The pendulum has swung back to Catholic tradition, and they should swing with it.

    Speaking of Roman seminaries, cassocks and uniforms, I just read of a house bought in Rome by a Mexican Order of nuns which wears the old 1950’s style habits, and the Roman neighbors are so stunned to see 20-30 young nuns in heavy black habits, big white winples and black veils painting walls, plastering, fixing up the fairly big foundation they bought ( a former Sisters of the Good Shepherd house- that the whole neighborhood has pitched in to help, wheras they never paid much attention to the former owners…the habitless Sisters of the Good Shepherd. They were pretty much ignored. That says alot. The cassock, uniform, or habit doesn’t make the seminarian, monk, nun or priest of course, but it’s an important witness which obviosuly very many people love and appreciate.

  35. Mike in NC says:

    For y’all’s information, images or descriptions of some national cassocks at:

    Roman dress (Fr Nicholas Schofield)

    A Lost Feature of Ecclesiastical Rome (Zadok the Roman)

    Rome’s National Cassocks (Fr Jim Tucker)

    Servant of God Frank Parater photo gallery (Richmond, Virginia, U.S.A. Diocese)

  36. Mike in NC says:

    Hmm, I tried posting a comment with four hyperlinks in it, and the comment was flagged as possible spam.

    Trying again, with three hyperlinks.

    For y’all’s information, here are blogs with images or descriptions of national cassocks:

    A Lost Feature of Ecclesiastical Rome (Zadok the Roman)

    Rome’s National Cassocks (Fr Jim Tucker)

    Roman Dress (Fr Nicholas Schofield)

  37. PMcGrath says:

    Fr. Z: During my all too brief Roman sojourn, I have been catching up with people and news..

    Would that include participating in Papa Benny’s visit to your Cathedral of Velletri-Segni?

  38. PNP, OP says:

    RBrown,

    I was writing specifically about the E.F. As far as I know, all any Dominican priest needs to celebrate the OP Rite is the permission of his provincial. We voluntary “gave up” the OP Rite after VC2; it was never officially suppressed.

    Fr. Philip, OP

  39. Nick says:

    Has anyone considered the possibility that two-hundred years hence the last 40-years of liturgical hell might wind up as a foot note under “Bad Art Period” –

  40. Paul Mac says:

    Angelo, I think it is not the English College itself that is venerable, but the Bede after whom it is named, usually known as the “Beda”.

  41. Fr. Paul McDonald says:

    Dear Fr. Moderator:
    There is a problem with the most recent post. It doesn’t want to load on my Blackberry®, and on my other computer it seems to contain only a line of Greek or something.

  42. RBrown says:

    I was writing specifically about the E.F. As far as I know, all any Dominican priest needs to celebrate the OP Rite is the permission of his provincial. We voluntary “gave up” the OP Rite after VC2; it was never officially suppressed.
    Fr. Philip, OP

    I was responding to Nick’s comment–that’s why his name follows the quote.

    Having said that, I nonetheless think that because SP refers to the Missal, it (by virtue of Quo Primum) also relieves the Provincial of any authority in the SOP mass. The exception acc to SP is an habitual community mass in religious houses.

  43. RBrown says:

    Angelo, I think it is not the English College itself that is venerable, but the Bede after whom it is named, usually known as the “Beda”.
    Comment by Paul Mac

    Bob above had it right. There are two different places.

    Venerable English College is in the centre of Rome, off Piazza Farnese.

    The Beda is near San Paolo.

  44. RBrown says:

    One other point: English College is known as “Venerable” because of the martyrs of the late 16th and 17th centuries who had been students there. It is very impressive to see their names engraved on the wall by the stairway.

    Besides VEC and the Beda, there is also Palazzola, the beautiful summer (and weekend) residence which overlooks Lake Albano.

  45. dcs says:

    Fred writes:
    The best missal for laypeople to use is the Saint Andrew’s Daily Missal. All the rubrics and prayers are correct.

    How can they all be correct if it hasn’t been updated since 1945?

  46. As to Dominicans and the M.P. The best interpreter of canon law is practice. Whatever a reading of Quo Primum in isolation and the abstract might imply, legislation by the Order and the Sacred Congregation of Rites indicate that both Rome and the Order considered Dominicans obligated to use the Dominican Rite. In fact, it took a petition to the Congregation back in the late 1950s to get permission for Dominicans teaching in mission seminaries the permission to use the Roman liturgy then in force. You can get cites for this and read more about in my series on the O.P. Rite, 1946-1969 over at New Liturgical Movement.

    On the other hand, as the Order in 1969 got permission of the Congregation to “adopt the Roman Rite” (that was the language, there is nothing in the rescript about “abandoning” the O.P. Rite), it would seem that Dominicans should be under the same discipline as other Roman priests in terms of celebration of the Tridentine rite. But as noted above use of the old rite for conventual Mass can only be instituted under the direction of the major superior (that’s in the M.P.).

    Pere Gy (a distinguished historian and liturgist of the Order, RIP), in 1983 was of the opinion that use and interpretation of the Dominican 1969 rescript should mimic the discipline of the parent (Roman) rite. This is also my opinion, but we will have to wait and see what the various provincials do–custom and practice are the best interpreters of law.

  47. David Kubiak says:

    I’m confused by reports on the Josephinum. The very solid vocations director of my diocese sends candidates there and I know that some a of these excellent men are very interested in the old rite. I hope this is not a case of the ‘conservative’ Catholic mentality warring against the ‘traditionalist’, which I think is much more unfortunate than the expected ‘liberal’ reaction. I would have thought Pope Benedict’s understanding of liturgy had put an end to the extreme ultramontanism that led groups like the Legionnaires to be hostile to the traditional liturgy.

  48. David M.O'Rourke says:

    Regarding the St. Andrews Daily Missal not being updated since 1945, May I point out that the imprimatur in mine is 1957 and certainly the rubrics are up to date for that time including the Pian Holy Week reforms. I remember seeing at least one later edition in which the lovely engravings had been replaced by some rather ordinary modern pictures but I can’t say for sure whether it was the 1962 Edition. I continued to use my missal until 1965 and, of course, I still have it. Few of the changes in 1962 would affect a laic using a 1957 hand missal. I believe that the rankings of the feasts was simplified in 1962 to 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Cl. However, by 1957 most of the Octaves were gone and ordinary Sundays were raised to the rank of Double which eliminated the extra Collects etc. Beyond that the average person doesn’t need to worry about whther the priest bows to the book or to the cross or whether he reads the lessons at Solemn HIgh Mass.

    As for the number of seminarians at the North American College I would think that the more pertinent question would be how many of the graduates of NAC have gone on to become bishops.It has been said that most seminaries are schools for priests but some, such as NAC are schools for bishops. That could be VERY significant.

  49. LeonG says:

    This is the Missal I use and will refuse any later edition since they then move into the Bugnini liturgical modernisation movement. We are going to see a plethora of new editions with the SP publicised and most of them will be suspect. What is an imprimatur genuinely worth these neomodernist days?

  50. Edward P. Walton says:

    It looks like there will be a High and Low Church in the US, like the Anglican (Episcopal) church…

    A few using the Tridentine Rite, with the great majority, using the Normal (Book of Common Prayer) Rite.

    Edward P. Walton

  51. RBrown says:

    It looks like there will be a High and Low Church in the US, like the Anglican (Episcopal) church…
    A few using the Tridentine Rite, with the great majority, using the Normal (Book of Common Prayer) Rite.
    Comment by Edward P. Walton

    I’m an ex Episcopalian who converted in 1970, and I never saw anything in the Episcopal Church to rival the disgusting liturgical crud I’ve been subjected to at most garden variety American masses: tambourines, guitar players, drums, hugging, flutes, trumpets, show biz celebrants . . . whatever.

    There’s a reason why these Episcopalian parishes who convert want to bring their own liturgy with them.

  52. Nathan says:

    + JMJ +

    Re the discussion on the “St Andrew’s Daily Missal:”

    I really like the St Andrew’s Missal because it has the “Kyriale” for High Mass (in modern musical notation), it prints the Latin for all the propers, and because the commentaries for every Sunday are top-notch—bringing together the Epistle/Gospel from Mass with the entirety of the day’s Divine Office. It is true that it hasn’t been updated, but the only times that I’ve had to really notice are 1) The propers for the Feast of the Assumption were changed by Pope Pius XII and 2) the “Confiteor” at distribution of Holy Communion to the faithful is omitted. Obviously, an updated Missal for Holy Week helps.

    I do think the St Andrew’s Missal, though, assumes a certain level of knowledge of the rubrics of the TLM—for instance, you have to bookmark a separate section for every Preface and there are no pictures of what the priest is doing at a given moment. For someone who is learning the use, it’s tough to beat the old St. Joseph’s Missal with the clear pictures and detailed descriptions of the actions taking place on the Altar.

    In Christ,