Jingle keys, jingle keys, jingle all the way

Remember my remark some time ago: "Did someone find the keys for the old dusty wardrobes?"

I think they did.

As Shouts points out, this chair, so much more dignified than the one we have seen for years in the Basilica, has been around for a while.

Meanwhile for the Urbi et Orbi blessing…

 

Precious miter of John Paul I, cope of John XXIII, throne of Leo XIII.   ‘Nuf said. 

And there is the not so little matter of the famous Seventh Candle.

"But Father!  But Father!", some of you are no doubt saying, "What’s with that seventh candle thing anyway?  Big deal!"

Yes, it is a big deal.   It is a signal to a watching world.  Indeed the whole world was watching, too: this was the televised Midnight Mass.

The seventh candle could be used for Pontifical High Mass when celebrated by an Ordinary in his diocese (or by the Pope anywhere, of course). The seventh candle, placed in the middle and in line with the other six, but it should be a little higher.  This pushes the crucifix a little out of line… which also emphasizes it, in my opinion.  Pope Benedict is acutely sensitive to the position of the Cross during Holy Mass. 

I wonder when the last time it was used?

The Holy Father, with his choice of vestments and the accouterments for the altar for Mass and for Vespers during Advent, not to mention the change of Master of Ceremony, is giving us a new orientation for divine worship. 

Old cabinets are being opened, wardrobes explored, curtains drawn back in rooms that have been locked, boxes brought into the light once again. 

Time to buy stock in silver and gold polish companies as well as the makers of dusters and citrus oils.

 

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34 Responses to Jingle keys, jingle keys, jingle all the way

  1. Matthew Mattingly says:

    I saw the former, (hardly missed), Master of Pontifical Ceremonies, Piero Marino sitting during the Midnight Mass with his pal (I think his name is Bishop Boccardo), who was also a former member of the Liturgical crew, and labeled a radical liberal in the mold of Piero Marini, Bugnini etc. by another website I read often. The camera settled on them about 3x during the Midnight Mass. Once, both of them looked either ill or annoyed. Maybe they were fuming to see all their “work” for the liturgy totally repudiated. As it should be.
    Piero Marini is almost 66, but Renato Boccardo I think is only 54-55. I thought it amusing that the two of them, so radical in their views would be sitting together.

  2. peretti says:

    This is most inspiring.

  3. Greg Smisek says:

    I wonder if they found Mr. Tumnus on the other side of the wardrobe…

    Oo, the possibilities for parody are just too rich.

  4. Al says:

    Your descrition of the Urbi et Orbi sounds like a commercial for a credit card. So here is my take:

    Precious miter of John Paul I,
    cope of John XXIII,
    throne of Leo XIII.

    Beauty that gives glory to God, Priceless!!!!!!!!!!

    There are some things money can’t buy,

    For Liturgies done right, there’s Papa Benedetto!

  5. Gustavo Ráez-Patiño says:

    And the dalmatics worn by the assistant deacons at the Mass, and by the cardinal deacons at the Urbi et Orbi blessing! Magnificent! Now at last they are using those vestments that were once so characteristic of Papal liturgies.

    Just one question: WHY this time there were no cardinal deacons at the Mass, as in the Mass for the feast of Christ the King? My guess is that the Pope wanted all of the cardinals present in Rome to concelebrate this Christmas Mass. I truly hope to see them again. Maybe at the Masses of January 1 or January 6. They will both be at St. Peter’s also.

  6. Marcos says:

    Hello Father
    One question: How far do you think Papa will go? How much of the tradition and of the traditional paraments do you think he is goin to bring back? Will it possible to we see the Papal Tiara and the saedia gestatoria in a recent future?

    You have a wonderful site, God bless you!

    Your blessing father,
    Marcos
    Brazil

  7. Raphaela says:

    Father, did you notice that, as the camera panned around during the distribution of Communion, everybody in the Holy Father’s line seemed to be receiving on the tongue? Granted the camera wasn’t on the Holy Father all the time, it still seems too coincidental that I didn’t spot a single communicant in his line receiving in the hand, considering that that was what most of the communicants in all the other lines were doing…

  8. Fr Renzo di Lorenzo says:

    Yes, Gustavo Ráez-Patiño. But just so you know, I heard a Cardinal Deacon (years ago) complain loudly that they are bishops, not deacons, and that, therefore, there shouldn’t be such a thing as a Cardinal Deacon. Go figure! How many non-sequiturs can you find?

  9. elizabeth mckernan says:

    An interesting comment regarding the reception of Communion on the tongue. In my own parish this is not done – or if it is I have not seen it. However, for various reasons I attend Mass in another parish from time to time and here reception on the tongue is an accepted practice and I was looking forward to being able to receive Holy Communion in this way once more. However, I have felt so nervous I have only received in this way a couple of times and have reluctantly gone back to receiving in the hand in order to concentrate fully.
    Before the change was introduced I never had a problem and wonder whether others are experiencing this dilemma and if so what they have been advised. I feel I cannot ask my own parish priest as I am sure he would advise carrying on receiving in the hand which I do not wish to do.

  10. Geoffrey says:

    I doubt we’ll see the papal tiara or the sedia gestatoria, but at this point who knows?! I have this question: would the tiara make an appearance when the pope wasn’t actually crowned with it? With no ceremony? It just all of a sudden appears one day? Hmmm…

  11. Dashing through the dust,
    with a big ol’ ring of keys,
    cleaning off the rust,
    brushing off our knees.
    Cupboards opened wide,
    Wardrobes all unlocked,
    those who closed these things inside
    really ought to be defrocked.

    [EVERYBODY SING!]

    Ohhhhh!

    Jingle keys, jingle keys,
    jingle all the way
    Oh! what joy to bring our things
    back into the light of day.
    Jingle keys, jingle keys,
    jingle all the way
    Oh! what joy to bring our things
    back into the light of day.

  12. BR says:

    Photos of the Pope at the Christmas celebrations are now posted at catholicpressphoto.com.

  13. Lorenzo says:

    Archbishop Boccardo is a friend of the Institut Bon Pasteur and preached the homily at a Solemn High Mass celebrated by one of the new IBP priests a few Sundays ago at Trinita dei Monti. It’s news to me that he’s a ‘radical liberal’.

  14. Vincenzo says:

    Al wrote:

    “Your description of the Urbi et Orbi sounds like a commercial for a credit card. So here is my take:

    Precious miter of John Paul I,
    cope of John XXIII,
    throne of Leo XIII.

    Beauty that gives glory to God, Priceless!”


  15. Fr Renzo di Lorenzo says:

    And, of course, Lorenzo is NOT Fr Renzo di Lorenzo.

  16. Former Altar Boy says:

    Elizabeth,
    Receiving Holy Communion on the tongue is the “normal” way to receive the Eucharist and no one can deny or prevent you from receiving that way (although I have heard of it happening in some super lib parishes). Back when I still attended the Novus Ordo Mass, I was one of the only ones in the parish that consistently received on the tongue. Far from being nervous, it gave me a kind of perverse pleasure (forgive me, Lord) to watch some of those liberal “Extraordinary” Eucharist ministers squirm when I received.

  17. Phil says:

    Father (and any fellow readers who may know the answer),

    I have wondered for some time about the significance of the six candles on the high altar. It seems they are always there wherever there is a high (or even just “back”) altar, whether or not it is the altar actually used at Mass. Now that you make particular note of the seventh candle, I wonder if you might be able to educate me (and others?) about the significance of the six candles.

    As an aside (and in the “just a thought” category), it would be interesting (to me at least) to have a short rundown of what all is on a proper “1962” altar: the candles, those cards (that have…the Canon? The Last Gospel?) My Internet searching has proved unproductive and my mother’s copy of THIS IS THE MASS doesn’t get in to much detail.

    Many thanks and best wishes for a blessed Christmas season!

  18. Will says:

    Former Altar Boy’s experience is similar to mine. At my parish it’s at least 95% in the hand, with only a few (myself included) receiving it on the tongue. I’m generally in the line that receives the host from the priest, and I’ve never gotten the impression that he has had an issue with it.

  19. Frederick says:

    I long to see the Holy Father Crowned as was the case for centuries

  20. Michael says:

    Frederick,

    Although the cope used on the first Sunday of Advent had the tiara above Benedict\’s shield embroidered on the side, the mitre showed up again on the mitre he used at midnight mass. I\’d say the tiara is gone for good.

  21. Melody says:

    Elizabeth- Just keep your hands reverently folded, say “amen” and open your mouth wide. The priest may hesitate, but he will figure it out. When I started receiving by mouth, the priest did take me aside to let me know I wasn’t opening my mouth enough. However, he treated my very kindly for wanting to receive so.

    Do any of the younger priests feel wierd when someone indicates they want to receive by mouth?

  22. Woody Jones says:

    Watching the Midnight Mass I saw a number of very fit looking young clerics looking remarkably similar and so I naturally wondered: Are some of them Legionaries? Sure enough, in his commentary Cardinal Foley noted that three Legionaries were amongst those serving, and I caught the name of at least one who had just been ordained to the priesthood on the previous Saturday, along with 47 brother Legionaries. It must have been quite an experience for Fr. Justin Kielhorn, LC and his two confreres.

    All the best of the season to everyone.

  23. Matt Q says:

    Woody Jones wrote:

    “Watching the Midnight Mass I saw a number of very fit looking young clerics looking remarkably similar and so I naturally wondered: Are some of them Legionaries? Sure enough, in his commentary Cardinal Foley noted that three Legionaries were amongst those serving, and I caught the name of at least one who had just been ordained to the priesthood on the previous Saturday, along with 47 brother Legionaries. It must have been quite an experience for Fr. Justin Kielhorn, LC and his two confreres.

    All the best of the season to everyone.”

    Thank you, Woody, for your best wishes. Also to you.

    Further adding to your comments, I have always noticed over the past couple of years when I’ve decided to stay up to watch the Pope’s Midnight Mass, that all of the young priests and seminarians all do look quite similar ( fit, as you put it ), as though they were… the Stepford priests? At times they are from the Legionaries, other times from the North American College. I used to think only the “collegiate-looking” get to go to that school or get to participate in the Papal Masses. For the sake of balance, I was glad to see the fat deacon chanting the Calens, etc. Also odd, for such an international event, why are there always only Americans assisting at Mass?

  24. Fr Renzo di Lorenzo says:

    WITH ALL THE JINGLE KEYS GOING ON… what I want to know is if anything has changed in the sacristy of Saint Peter’s.

    I mean, before, they would just about spit on you if you wanted to celebrate the 1962 missal. That’s from personal experience. My last attempt there was pre-7.7.7 (a couple years back, in fact). What an aggravation. But now, has it changed? I mean, can you choose any altar, such as that of Pius X, or must one go the Hungarian chapel, bring one’s own missal, candles, vestments[sic], etc., and be locked behind the gate of a side-side corridor?

    More specifically, I want to offer a requiem for one of the greatest promoters of tradition in the southern hemisphere, who suffered so much for the restoration of the usage of the 1962 Missal. Do you know if they have black vestments available?

  25. Gregorius Minor says:

    The nasty proessional cross has got to go. And be carried by someone else.

  26. Flabellum says:

    It is not a processional cross, it is a pastoral staff.
    Do you think the falda is still in the Vatican Laundry? And as for the fanon…. And would the subcinctorium be visible?

  27. Habemus Papam says:

    I read on The New Liturgical Movement website that the Throne used for Midnight Mass this year is actually part of the Sedia Gestatoria. So it would’nt be a huge leap if Pope Benedict were picked up and carried in it.

  28. Fr. Aidan Logan, OCso says:

    The seven candles at the Papal Mass and at the Mass of an Ordinary in his diocese were never abolished. They, aong with the pontfical dalmatic worn under the chasuble and many other things are specifically provided for in the Post Vatican II (1984) Careemonial Episcoporum. Most bishops, together with the late papal master of ceremonies, have gone out of their way to ignore this important book which, along with specific directions for a bishop’s Mass and other ceremonies conducted by a bishop, provides an offical commentary on the liturgy. It give instructions on how to use incense, how to fold one’s hands, how to form up a procession, etc. So far Msgr G. Marini is simply implimenting the actuial rubrics of the Ordinary Form. What a novel approach!

    I have tried many time to get bishops to follow these instructions but have usually met with a remark to the effect that no one does these things. I did, however, get an archbishop to take off his shoes one Good Friday — though he claimed never to have done it before and never to have seen it done.

    The seven candles are clearly an evocation of the heavenly liturgy depicted in the Book of Revelation (Rev. 4:5). They also harken back to the seven brached caldleabrum of the Tebernacle (Exodus 25:37). The Carermoniale also calls for seven candles to be carried in the processions at the beginning and end of a Pontifical Mass. Was this done at the Holy Father’s Midnight Mass? Prior to the reform of Paul VI they were also carred in the Gospel Procession at the Papal Liturgy.

  29. Fr Renzo di Lorenzo says:

    So, does this mean that no one knows anything about whether anything has changed in the sacristy of Saint Peter’s to make the offering of the Mass (1962) more possible? See my comment above, from yesterday.

  30. Chad says:

    The throne the Holy Father used for midnight Mass was not part of the sedia. The throne for the sedia has curved arms and is high and rounded.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:GestatorialChair1.jpg

  31. Louis E. says:

    What of Dr. Wright’s suggestion that the Pope be presented with a camelaucum (which preceded the mitre AND tiara as papal headgear and is perhaps contemporary with the form of pallium now made part of the papal regalia?)

  32. Two areas I would like to see fixed next year.
    Ceremonial of Bishops, n. 31: “But in celebrations presided over by the bishop it is fitting that readers formally instituted proclaim the readings …”. Only men can be instituted as lectors, so the second reading should not be by a woman. The instituted lectors should wear vestments (Introduction to the Lectionary, n. 54).
    After the second reading, instead of the deacon bowing to the Pope for his blessing while holding the Book of the Gospels, the following should be observed from the 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal:
    “175. If incense is used, the deacon assists the priest when he puts incense in the thurible during the singing of the Alleluia or other chant. Then he makes a profound bow before the priest and asks for the blessing, saying in a low voice, Iube, domine, benedicere (Father, give me your blessing). The priest blesses him, saying, Dominus sit in corde tuo (The Lord be in your heart). The deacon signs himself with the Sign of the Cross and responds, Amen. Having bowed to the altar, he then takes up the Book of the Gospels which was placed upon it.”

  33. SMJ says:

    Chad,

    Yes, it is a dedia gestatoria.
    Look at the last photo of this post from Hallowedground:

    http://hallowedground.wordpress.com/2007/11/05/1946-consistory/

  34. Habemus Papam says:

    Clarification, NLM website: it was A sedia gestatoria (rather than THE sedia) Apparently theres more than one.