REVIEW: Baronius Press 1962 hand missal

The kind folks at Baronius Press sent me a few of their publications: the small blue volume of the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, a Bible with the Douay-Reims version, and their highly touted daily hand missal for Holy Mass with the 1962 Missale Romanum.

CLICK HERE TO BUY the MISSAL.

Let’s look at the hand missal.

First, it was a real pleasure to see this book again.  I had seen one once before during a trip to the UK.  This time I had a chance to give it a good examination.

The leather binding should prove to be very durable and there is a good number of ribbons.  The book lies open fairly well enven though it is not broken in.  The pages are gilded and the paper is extremely thin but strong.  This keeps the book thin and comfortable in the hand, which is very important to me.

There are good features, including an appendix with propers for regions, as in the UK and the USA.

There is a section with the little office which would be good for lay people in their devotional prayer.

Also, in the appendix, there is a section with the normal chants for Mass in good Gregorian notation:

The section you would use the most is well laid out:

I am impressed by this hand missal which, so far, is probably the best I have seen.  If you are looking for something for yourself or as a gift, this would be a great choice.

Also, I think it would be good to support Baronius at the moment.  They are going to be preparing an altar missal and no doubt need the cash flow to keep it going.  If their altar missal is as nice as the hand missal, it will be a wonderful tool.  They are also working on other titles, such as an English-Latin Breviary.

If you have more questions, contact them here and tell them Fr. Z sent you.

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58 Responses to REVIEW: Baronius Press 1962 hand missal

  1. danphunter1 says:

    Father,
    Angelus Press publishes an absolutely beautiful 1962 hand missal.
    I have both the Baronius and Angelus missals and the Angelus is decidedly better in construction and side bar notes.
    Do you own an Angelus Press missal, Father, and if not would you like one?
    God bless you.

  2. Luke P. says:

    Fr. Z,

    I used that very same Missal for two years when I lived in Ohio for my undergrad. It’s a wonderful missal and served me well. I now attend a Novus Ordo in PA and have switched back to my other one. But I can attest to it’s wonderful design. As my Latin improves, I sometimes wish I could find a Missal for either form that was only in Latin but that’s just me being picky. :)

    Lmp

  3. dan: If the Angelus Press wants to send me one, I will gladly look at it and review it.

  4. FloridaJohn says:

    Thanks for the info, I just ordered the Daily Hand Missal and the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary. I got free shipping too! That was a surprise! Thanks again! My Daily Missal of the Mystical Body from P.J. Kenedy & Sons is just about worn out after many years of use. Unfortunately, there still is NO old Latin Mass near me except an unauthorized one in a tiny chapel.

  5. paul says:

    I can’t wait to get my hands on the English-Latin Roman Breviary. I’m going to buy that as soon as it’s ready. Currently I use a Monastic Diurnal (1963) from St. Michael’s Abbey Shop, which is also excellent qaulity.

  6. danphunter1 says:

    Father,
    I have just contacted the editor of Angelus Press and he said that he would love to send you a copy of their hand missal.
    What address should he send it to?
    God bless you

  7. Philothea says:

    I have the Baronius Missal, and it is everything Fr. Z has indicated. My only problem with it is that the print is so small. My age is showing!

  8. dan: If Angelus Press drops me a line, I will give them the best address.

  9. Jon says:

    Father,

    I’ve owned the Baronius Missal since it came out three years ago. It’s my constant companion. I’m sure when Henry logs in he’ll wax eloquent about it in greater detail.

    An interesting aside, the FSSP calls this missal “our missal.” As you can see, Bishop Bruskewitz granted the imprimatur. It’s the only 1962 Missal to have the honor of an imprimatur in over 40 years. The FSSP petitioned him for it, and he gave it, I’ve been told by good FSSP authority, on condition that the Divine Mercy devotion and the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary be included. These to His Excellency’s eyes apparently makes the Missal a living thing, and not an artifact. I found it interesting. Of course the edition you received, I’m sure, is even more “living,” as it contains a copy of Summorum Pontificum, unlike mine.

    Two weeks ago I had occasion to be in Scranton, and stopped by Fraternity Publications, where they’re located. I picked up my own copy of the Little Office of the BVM. It’s beautiful, well-bound, and durable. It also carries an imprimatur by Bishop Bruskewitz along with a forward by Father John Berg, Superior General of the FSSP. I also like the fact the title page carries a note “In conformity with the 1961 Edition Typica of the Roman Breviary being that permitted by Summorum Pontificum.”

    I highly recommend it for anyone interested in praying the traditional Office. It’s perfect for traveling. And given the proper promotion through use, advertising, and word of mouth, I can see it in no time at all overtaking Shorter Christian Prayer.

  10. jack burton says:

    I love my Angelus Press Missal and I’m dying to get the Baronius Press Roman Breviary when it finally comes out.

    You’re a good salesman father! I’m tempted to scoop up a redundant Baronius Missal after reading your post. Maybe I’m just a sucker. hehe

  11. Wm. Christopher Hoag says:

    I have had all variety of hand missals over the past 25 years: St. Andrew Daily and Sunday, St. Joseph Sunday, New Marian, Fulton J Sheen Sunday, St. Pius X Daily, Maryknoll…and the list goes on.

    Although my Missale Romanum Editio II Juxta Typicam Vaticanam Amplificata I (Benzinger Bros. 1942) is my prized handmissal, my Baronius Press First Edition is my all-time favourite Latin-English handmissal. I like much better than the Angelus Press edition, and the matching Douay-Rheims bible is a nice complement.

  12. danphunter1 says:

    Father,
    Angelus Press is calling your number, in the US, as I write this.
    A Mr Vogel, the executive at Angelus Press, who by the way met you in Kansas City this past week, told me that he loves your website and is eager to get you a copy of their hand missal.
    I am glad to help your holy cause, anytime.
    Ut Prosim,
    Dan

  13. Fr Arsenius says:

    The Baronius Press missal is a good resource. An older couple who come frequently for the TLM bought a copy, but gave it away when they reluctantly realized that the print was so tiny that they would have great difficulty reading the text. One could wish that Baronius would have foregone the non-essentials in lieu of a larger font that would have made this great resource usable by a wider audience. I can read it now, but in about ten years…?

  14. RichR says:

    I recently bought Baronius Press’s Little Office of the BVM, and it is very well-done. In fact, I am considering having my schola record the chants found in the appendix of the book so others can learn how to chant the office.

    I have seen the Angelus Press and Baronius Press 1962 hand missals. I think the Morrocan leather binding with the BP missal makes it a better buy. JMHO.

  15. gengulphus says:

    Fr Arsenius – “foregone the non-essentials in lieu of a larger font”.
    I so agree, and eagerly await the publication of a Latin-only hand missal.

  16. gengulphus says:

    Fr Arsenius – “foregone the non-essentials in lieu of a larger font”.
    I so agree, and eagerly await the publication of a Latin-only hand missal.

  17. James says:

    I have both the Baronius missal and the Baronius pocket Douay-Rheims Bible. Both are wonderful companions. I went to England and Ireland over Christmastide, and each fit into the side pockets of my backpack.

    The text is somewhat small (though the ordinary of the Mass is a good size), but if you are older, a magnifying glass would come in handy. I am personally glad for all the prayers and devotions included. I bring it everywhere, even to the Novus Ordo and to Confession.

    Both are very handsome editions, though I think the ribbons could be sturdier (they are starting to fray after only a year and a half).

    I also have an abridged Latin-English Divine Office published by Angelus. It’s very sturdy with very high-quality paper and has Prime, Sext and Compline for Mon-Sat and Lauds, Prime, Sext, Vespers and Compline for Sunday.

  18. Rouxfus says:

    I have had the Baronius 1962 Missal for the last year, and I take it with me to the Ordinary English daily and Sunday Sunday masses – it is a wonderful resource for what they include in a section called “The most necessary Prayers”, “An Abridgement of Christian Doctrine”, “Devotions for Confession” (which includes an Examination of Conscience) and especially “Devotions for Communion”. I like to read a couple of the Prayers Before Communion to prepare myself for receiving the Eucharist, and the “Prayers After Communion” after receiving them. I especially like the prayers from St. Thomas and St. Ambrose in those sections.

    This volume is not only a wonderful guide to the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, but it is a wonderfully complete resource for our Faith. That and the extraordinary quality (ahem) put into the publication of the book make it a great value – the price is more than justified.

    I notice some interesting differences in my edition from the one pictured – the corners of the pages in Fr. Z’s review copy are beveled to a round instead of a sharp right angle. I imagine this will make the book wear longer.

    The six ribbons in my version (MMIV, printed in India) are distributed less evenly across the binding – they are more bunched towards the beginning of the book. (Here is how I’m using them right now, in order of their arrangement along the binding: red – prayers before/after communion; green & purple – variable parts of the mass for the day; gold – preface; white – beginning of the mass for the catechumens; black: the last gospel.

    One other thing worth mentioning is the beautiful woodcut illustrations littering the book. Here’s a link to an example.

  19. Mark says:

    I love this Missal! The only way I would fault it is that it does not contain the older form of Penance. Apart from that, I love it!

    Father, review the Little Office for us all!

    I can’t wait for the English-Latin Breviary either. I have the “FSSP” reprint of the 1962 Dessain edition, but am finding I am missing the “intelligibility” of the prayer due to my poor (non-existant) Latin.

  20. Henry Edwards says:

    I’m sure when Henry logs in he’ll wax eloquent about it in greater detail.

    Actually, Jon, let me sidestep that lofty expectation, and simply quote the following paragraph that concludes Bishop Bruskewitz’s foreword to the Baronius missal.

    “It is my hope that this finely produced hand missal will also serve to introduce those unfamiliar with the traditional Roman Rite to its particular beauty. May it likewise contribute to the understanding that the older rites need not be disdained in order to appreciate the new, nor must the new rites be disparaged in order to love the old. In the Diocese of Lincoln, both the traditional and the new Roman rites are available to the faithful, and are celebrated with dignity. Those who participate in one or both of these forms of the Roman rite do so in a spirit of mutual appreciation and peace. It is my humble prayer that this publication will promote the same spirit of mutual respect among Catholics everywhere, regardless of the form of the Roman Rite they use to give honor and glory to God.”

    This beautiful statement, written in 2004, describes the wholesome way in which the old and new Masses can complement each other and enrich the worship of all faithful Catholics. How could it possibly capture better the spirit in which we might hope and pray that all of Bishop Bruskewitz’s fellow prelates would receive our Supreme Pontiff’s motu proprio of 2007?

  21. Henry Edwards says:

    Father Z: There is a section with the little office which would be good for lay people in their devotional prayer.

    This statement might be open to misinterpretation. The illustrative page shown beneath this comment is from an 80-page section entitled “The Offices of Tenebrae in Holy Week”. This section consists of the full morning offices (Matins and Lauds) for the 3 days of the Sacred Triduum, and is a wonderful contribution to personal devotion during Holy Week for those in locales where the traditional Holy Week liturgy is not celebrated publicly in its full glory.

    However, this missal does not include a “little office” in the usual sense of this phrase. What it does contain is the complete traditional (5 psalm) Vespers for every Sunday and first class feast of the Church calendar.

    So with this missal (or the equivalent one from Angelus Press) in hand, together with the Angelus Press “Divine Office” mentioned by James above, a beginning layman can sample a pretty good slice of the seven traditional day hours by praying Prime, Sext, and Compline every day of the week, and Lauds and Vespers on Sundays, plus Vespers on all first class feast days as well.

    The point perhaps being that these full-service daily hand missals are comprehensive daily private prayer books as well.

  22. Emilio says:

    Rouxfus,

    I pre-ordered the SP edition when it was announced, but grew impatient and found a copy of the earlier 2004 version via amazon.com, so now I can compare them side by side. The first difference I saw was that the new version is noticeably thinner. Possibly only 1/4″ or so, but it really makes it easier to hold. The rounded page edges and more even gilding are also improvements. Having SP printed in it is nice, but they should have asked Fr Z for his translation, avoiding “stable groups”. :-)

    The leather used for the binding is a bit shinier and with less noticeable grain in the new version. I like the older binding better, but the new one matches the binding of their bible and it’s more like the binding of a couple of older Missals I have, and there’s nothing wrong with that…

  23. Impatient for Tradition says:

    I have a copy of the “Little Office” pictured above, and while I am generally pleased (especially the look and feel of the binding), I have come across several errors (spelling, misplaced text and prayers, inconsistent words at the end of the prayers, etc.). I have written to Baronius Press about the errors, and hopefully they’ll be corrected for the 2nd printing. Also, the ribbon markers are shredding pretty quickly (after a couple of months’ use). Definitely will have to be replaced long before the binding wears out… I have resorted to using a couple of on-line versions of the Little Office as a cross-check, even though they are not exactly the same as the 1962 version. If anyone is interested in those, here are the links: http://officiumparvum.blogspot.com/ and http://medievalist.net/hourstxt/home.htm . I find the on-line versions very useful when I’m at the computer.

  24. K.M. says:

    The Angelus edition carries elements from the beautiful Marian Missal cir. 1956-58.

    Many in the FSSP, I know, use the Angelus edition, as do I, and I can’t recommend
    it highly enough.

  25. Allan says:

    Does anyone know where a high quality DVD of the TLM may be obtained? TUIA.

  26. Henry Edwards says:

    There are now a number of high quality DVD’s of the TLM. On the whole, the most beautiful probably are the two DVD’s of the Sept. 14 and Dec. 15 Solemn High Masses telecast from Mother Angelica’s Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament. Go to

    http://www.ewtnreligiouscatalogue.com

    and search on “High Mass”. For just one, I’d get the historic Sept. 14 DVD with not only the whole 2-hour Mass but including the historic sermon by Fr. Calvin Goodwin FSSP marking the occasion of the implementation of Summorum Pontificum.

    Both these are simply copies of 2-hour TV broadcasts, but with very carefully planned camera angles and professional editing. A different sort of classic is the DVD package for the first Solemn High Mass of Fr. James Fryar FSSP:

    http://www.thefirstmass.com/

    In addition to the Mass itself on one disk, there is a 2nd disk that shows the Mass but with the sound being Fr. Fryar’s beautiful and moving personal reflections on it.

  27. Josh says:

    I love the Baronius Missal, though I would prefer the English and Latin in the same size type.

    I think the Little Office is well laid out and is nicely bound, but the number of typos is very distracting. I purchased two copies so that my wife and I can pray at least one hour a day together (I myself pray the Breviarium Romanum, but she does not read Latin). But I cannot pray it because I find the errors too frequent and distracting. I am currently working on a \”Corrigenda\” for the Little Office which may be of interest to some.

    Hopefully their reprint of the Breviarium Romanum will follow their excellent Missal and not be plagued with errors like the Little Office – I would be a very unhappy customer if I spend what I think it will cost and it contains that many errors.

  28. Father Bartoloma says:

    I pre-ordered the Altar Missal for my bi-monthly TLM. It put quite a dent in my wallet :( ($410!) but yes, it does look like it will be the best available. I look forward to it arriving asap.

  29. Jonathan Bennett says:

    As a clarification in regards to some of the posts above, while Baronius Press has worked with the FSSP in the past the actual “FSSP Missal” is from Fraternity Publications, not Baronius which publishes it’s own Missal (which, in my opinion, is the better of the two).

    Having owned the Missals published by both Baronius Press and Angelus Press I can say that in physical quality, layout and structure, and material contained within the Anglus Press Daily Roman Missal is superior.

  30. Henry Edwards says:

    Jonathan: while Baronius Press has worked with the FSSP in the past the actual “FSSP Missal” is from Fraternity Publications, not Baronius which publishes it’s own Missal

    (1) Perhaps this statement itself could stand some clarification. I’m unaware that the FSSP (Fraternity Publications) has never published a hand missal. So far as I know, Fraternity Publications sells only the Baronius Press missal which, which Baronius says is “published by Baronius Press in association with the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter.” The first edition in 2004, the recent 2nd edition being the one Fr. Z has in hand.

    (2) Comparing the Angelus and Baronius missals is a separate issue. I have both the Angelus and the Baronius missal, use both constantly, and have noticed no significant difference in their contents, especially knowing that both are derived from the same well-known Sylvester Jurgens family of missals from 1962 and earlier, each with slightly different insertions in the original missal, constituting a minuscule percentage of each derivative missal.

    However, as you mention there are differences in format, layout, form factor, and typography. In general, I find the Angelus missal propers more easily used (with the Latin text set larger), but the Baronius ordinary more easily used (more readable type using the whole page rather than leaving much of it in blank margins). However, I know from discussion with others that reactions to these factors can reverse from one person to the next.

    The English translations of the ordinary differ. I slightly prefer the Baronius translation, but the Angelus missal uses its wide margins to insert some of the most beautiful notes on the Mass that I’ve ever seen. An example of the fact that, however I look at the two missals, the decision is not clear cut.

    Another difference is that the binding of the Angelus missal looks like it would take scuffs better, while the Baronius binding feels more sumptuous. Maybe I should reserve the Angelus for the wear and tear of daily low Mass, the Baronius for grand solemn high Masses. However, I have access to neither on a regular basis, just a Sunday missa cantata.

  31. Bill Haley says:

    Rich R,
    I was given the Little Office for Christmas and would be quite interested if you have the chants recorded.

    Fr. Z,
    If Rich R. or anyone comes up with recordings of the chants, can we have a “What does the Office prayers sound like?”

    Impatient for tradition,
    If you tie a knot at the bottom of the ribbons, which are thin enough to do so, they will last much longer.

  32. Matt says:

    I don’t understand why some of you are saying the Angelus Press version is better. I recently had the opportunity to see it in a bookstore and honestly it wasn’t anything special compared to the Baronius version.

    Truth be told I’m glad I purchased the Baronius one last year over the Angelus. It seemed more complete to me and all things being equal I would rather support Baronius over Angelus.

    Before I ordered it I actually asked a priest if getting the Angelus would be “bad”. He said it didn’t matter but I couldn’t square my conscience with supporting them. However I make no moral judgments on anyone who prefers the Angelus.

  33. mike says:

    I bought the Baronius when it first came out tho I already had some other older missals. I guess I bought it for the novelty. It is a good study guide but it seems silly to page thru it during Mass trying to follow EVERYTHING verbatim.

    BTW, while I haven’t seen an Angelus Press missal, it would seem that from what I’ve read it is about the equal of a Baronius.

    m

  34. Diane says:

    If Baronius Press is reading:

    Please, do add the kind of commentaries found in the Angelus Missal throughout the Ordinary of the Mass. Those commentaries have helped me tremendously in understanding what is happening and why.

    I was going to purchase the motu proprio edition by Baronius, but can’t let go of the Angelus, which I bought before I knew it was affiliated with the SSPX.

  35. KK says:

    My Missal and Little Office are on the way. Thanks for the tip and the review. I left a message that “Fr. Z Sent me.” I’m sure their shipping dept. is wondering what hit them.

  36. schoolman says:

    “If Baronius Press is reading:

    Please, do add the kind of commentaries found in the Angelus Missal throughout the Ordinary of the Mass. Those commentaries have helped me tremendously in understanding what is happening and why.

    I was going to purchase the motu proprio edition by Baronius, but can’t let go of the Angelus, which I bought before I knew it was affiliated with the SSPX.”
    ==============================

    Diane, I share the same sentiments. Part of me would like to buy the new edition of the Baronius missal, however, the commentaries in the margin of the Angelus missal are priceless! It was a stroke of genius to include those in the missal. Of course we do not know the exact source of these commentaries, however, they seem solid and beautiful in every detail. Now Barronius, if they were smart, would do something similar — and even taking it up a notch. I would advise them to comb through the writings of Cardinal Ratzinger and Pope Benedict for short quotes/extracts that correspond to the theology of each aspect of the ordinary. Then, perhaps I would ask the Holy Father to endorse it by providing a short preface to the edition…

  37. Jon says:

    Impatient,

    “I have a copy of the “Little Office” pictured above…I have come across several errors”

    Alas, too true. There aren’t many, but they’re there. Baronius may have heard your cry, though. My copy came with errata cards for pages 67 and 114.

  38. David2 says:

    I love the Baronius Press hand Missal.

    I have used the Angelus version in the past, and I disagree that it is “decidedly better in construction and side bar notes”. It feels rather “cheap and nasty” in comparison to the Baronius version. Baronius’ construction standards are decidedly better; and unlike Angelus, they don’t kill that elusive 1970′s mammal, the Vinyl, to cover their books ;)

  39. dcs says:

    I have a copy of the “Little Office” pictured above, and while I am generally pleased (especially the look and feel of the binding), I have come across several errors (spelling, misplaced text and prayers, inconsistent words at the end of the prayers, etc.).

    It is possible that the errors are in the original. I have the St. Bonaventure Publications version of the “Little Office,” which is simply a reprint of a 1911 Benziger Bros. version, and there are several errors in it.

  40. Malta says:

    Matt; “He said it didn’t matter but I couldn’t square my conscience with supporting them. However I make no moral judgments on anyone who prefers the Angelus.”

    That’s funny! Many Catholic consciences square themselves with reading secular, even anti-catholic, material from non-Catholic publishers; but when it comes to Angelus, “Shhhh, don’t support them!” Give me a break!

  41. Josh says:

    Many of the errors in the Baronius Little Office look like OCR-related mistakes that weren’t caught. They probably scanned an older Breviary that had imperfect type, and the OCR didn’t correctly analyze some of the letters.

  42. Matt says:

    Malta; “That’s funny! Many Catholic consciences square themselves with reading secular, even anti-catholic, material from non-Catholic publishers; but when it comes to Angelus, “Shhhh, don’t support them!” Give me a break!”

    What is your point? Mine is that I won’t support the SSPX. I am a convert and authority was a big issue for my joining the Catholic Church. Its pretty simple.

    I’m sorry if you agree with them, but I choose not to support them. With regards to their Missal, it is fine but not better than Baronius Missal.

    If anyone else has the Monastic Diurnal from St. Michael’s Press btw, I’m pretty sure they were printed in the same place. The binding is identical and they both say “Printed in India.” So the quality is great.

  43. Geoffrey says:

    I purchased both the Baronius and the Angelus Missal as soon as they came out… being a publisher, it is best to keep an eye on the competition!

    I prefer the Baronius Missal. It is updated with the Luminous Mysteries, etc., and it fits nicely in the hand. The layout and content of the Angelus Missal is nice, as it includes the sacraments, but the cover is weak and it is associated with the SSPX (big negative for me).

    I will use the Baronius Missal for now… until I make something better!

  44. David2 says:

    Matt – exactly. Speaking as a convert myself, why should I support the SSPX when Baronius produces a perfectly adequate product that has the added benefit of being, in my opinion, a more handsome volume?

    Malta writes “Many Catholic consciences square themselves with reading secular, even anti-catholic, material from non-Catholic publishers..” That is (to put it politely) an inapposite comment. It’s not like I’m taking a newspaper or the Book of Common Prayer or a Jack Chick Tract into Mass with me. I’m taking a 1962 Missal. Produced by folks who’ve had the cajones to stick it out inside the barque of Peter, when it might have been easier to thumb the nose at the Holy See and go one’s own way, like little Cranmers.

  45. Ottaviani says:

    The Baronius Missal had several mistakes in it as well, such as the references to the pages for Tenebrae.

    I hope these have been corrected.

    With regards to the Luminous Mysteries insertion: while I do not doubt for a second that Bishop Bruskewitz had good intentions, it was a little bit pastorally insenstive to include them considering that they are not mandatory at all and considering who the Missal is directed at. Most people who will buy the Baronius Missal will not use them at all. This is a fact.

  46. Mark says:

    Ottaviani: don’t be so sure; some of us might! After all, there is nothing wrong with them, per se.

  47. Father Z,

    I noticed your picture of the supplements for the Dioceses of the United States was opn to the page for the “Diocese of Steubenville”! ;-)

    Let us hope it gets used there!

    In ICXC,

    Gordo

  48. K.M. says:

    “Produced by folks who’ve had the cajones to stick it out inside the barque of Peter, when it might have been easier to thumb the nose at the Holy See and go one’s own way, like little Cranmers.”

    You have the “little Cranmers” (a ridiculous analogy) to thank for Summorum Pontificum
    and the preservation of any semblance of tradition in the Church)

  49. Pat says:

    I have both the Baronius and Angelus Missals as well as two older (1959 and 1961) St. Joseph Missals. For the propers of some Masses, the Baronius Missal has “Lesson” in place of “Epistle.” Is there a reason for this? It’s not consistent. For some Masses it’s “Lesson,” and for others it’s “Epistle.”

    Both Baronius and Angelus are nice books.

    Thanks.

  50. Henry Edwards says:

    Pat,
    Perhaps you will notice the pattern that the first reading of a Mass is called an “Epistle” if it’s from a letter (of St. Paul), a “Lesson” if it’s an Old Testament reading.

  51. Sylvia says:

    My boyfriend has the Angelus Press missal while I have the Baronius motu proprio edition (Christmas gift from my wonderful mother). We looked at the two side-by-side and it seems that apart from the larger size and “helpful commentaries” the Angelus one had, they are largely the same. I used to envy my boyfriend his missal, but I think I am quite happy with my Baronius Press missal, as are several other people I know. :)

  52. Joe. B. says:

    “You have the “little Cranmers” (a ridiculous analogy) to thank for Summorum Pontificum and the preservation of any semblance of tradition in the Church)”

    AND you have them also to thank for altar girls, communion in the hand, etc., etc.

    And frankly, the idea that the Holy Father’s primary motivation for the M.P. was to make the schismatics happy rather than begin a reconsideration of the current state of worship that might also reconcile some Lefevrites strikes me as fantasy land.

  53. Erick Haas says:

    Hi;

    I would love to see if perhaps one of our traditional women’s orders, or a traditional
    society of the laity, would take it upon themselves to proofread every single page of
    these texts, especially the Holy Bible. I own quite a few of the traditional Missals
    and Holy Bibles, and on my own have found a nearly unbelievable number of errors.
    This is simply due to modern printing technologies, such as optical character
    recognition and text-alignment processes; and should not be taken as a slight against
    anyone’s reputation or trade.

    So, while I have found a number of textual errors on my own, it will be almost
    impossible for me to do this all by myself. Therefore, I am very much looking for
    a traditional order to take this up on their own. Anyone who is seriously interested
    may contact me at erickhaas@yahoo.com.

    Thanks!

    Erick

  54. Pat says:

    Henry Edwards: “Perhaps you will notice the pattern that the first reading of a Mass is called an ‘Epistle’ if it’s from a letter (of St. Paul), a ‘Lesson’ if it’s an Old Testament reading.”

    That makes a bit of sense now. I see that, for example, in the Baronius Missal for Thursday after Ash Wednesday, the “Lesson” is from the Prophet Isaias, and bracketed comments say “[The Epistle of today...]“. The Angelus Missal is virtually identical (including the Baronius bracketed comments) except that it does not call it “Lesson” but rather “Epistle.” There are, however, some places to be found in both the Angelus Missal and in my older St. Joseph Missals where “Lesson” does replace “Epistle” and it appears that the difference is in which books of the Old Testament are classified as “Lesson.”

    Thank you for the information!

  55. Don Juan says:

    “It’s not like I’m taking … the Book of Common Prayer
    … into Mass with me.”

    That’s funny. I do. In fact, they pass them out at my parish, because, unlike
    some groups that claim to be Catholic, we are in union with the Holy See
    under the Pastoral Provision of Pope John Paul II.

    And the “little Cranmer” bit is ridiculous.

  56. jack burton says:

    David2: Are you serious? This “little Cranmer” stuff is asinine you popish, papist clown Masser. I am totally teasing btw. But seriously, what is up with that? – For the first time I’m embarrassed to be associated with a thread on this site, and yet I can’t stop myself from typing at this moment… Umm… Speechless.

  57. jack burton says:

    David2:
    I’ve had posts of mine mysteriously disappear (deleted by Father?) so I’m probably a hypocrite for busting your chops on this. :-D
    I shouldn’t post at 4 or 5 am because my inhibitions are too low. haha

  58. pizanoe says:

    I bought the Roman Missal intending to use it for daily mass, but I couldn’t find the readings for last Sunday’s mass. I’m very dissapointed. Otherwise it is a beautiful Missal which has some useful stuff in it.