PRAYERCAzT 18: 3rd Sunday of Lent (1962 Missale Romanum)

Welcome to another installment of What Does the Prayer Really Sound Like? 

Today we will hear the prayers for the 3rd Sunday of Lent in the 1962 Missale Romanum.  I speak all the prayers and readings and sing the Preface for Lent in the solemn tone, and also sing the Collect and Post Communion in the solemn tone.  


http://www.wdtprs.com/prayercazt/080223_03_lent.mp3

If priests who are learning to say the older form of Holy Mass can get these prayers in their ears, they will be able to pray them with more confidence. So, priests are my very first concern. 

However, these audio projects can be of great help to lay people who attend Holy Mass in the Traditional, or extraordinary form: by listening to them ahead of time, and becoming familiar with the sound of the before attending Mass, they will be more receptive to the content of the prayers and be aided in their full, conscious and active participation.

My pronunciation of Latin is going to betray something of my nationality, of course. Men who have as their mother tongue something other than English will sound a little different.  However, we are told that the standard for the pronunciation of Latin in church is the way it is spoken in Rome.  Since I have spent a lot of time in Rome, you can be pretty sure my accent will not be too far off the mark.

  I deliver them at a slower pace than I would ordinarily during Mass.  But hopefully the pace will help you hear the words a little more clearly.

If this was useful to you, let your priest friends know this resource is available.  And kindly make a little donation using the donation button on the left side bar of the blog or or by clicking here.  This is a labor of love, but those donations really help.  And don’t forget to check out the PODCAzTs!

Pray for me, listen carefully, and practice practice practice.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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5 Responses to PRAYERCAzT 18: 3rd Sunday of Lent (1962 Missale Romanum)

  1. Rev. Walter F. Kedjierski says:

    Fr. Z – Thank you so much for this “prayer cast.” Tomorrow is my very first public Mass in the extraordinary form!! I have been reading aloud the propers for the past week but must admit I was a little bit unsure about a few of the words (a few words this week are new to me). I was so happy to hear that most (but cerainly not all!) of my pronunciation was on target and your “prayer cast” has given me the confidence to not just think, but know, that I am saying the prayers correctly! Please, if at all possible, keep this up as often as you can — it can really put a newcomer to this at greater ease. God bless you and please say a prayer that I do not make the Mass I celebrate tomorrow any less edifying or beautiful than God meant it to be.

  2. Andrew says:

    For members of clergy (and others) who are interested in listening to live Latin I also recommend:

    http://www.vocealta.info/ – go to \”lectiones\” for lots of useful material.

  3. Fr. Kedjierski: THANKS FOR THAT! I really appreciate this sort of feedback. I almost wish you had left voicemail for me, so I could include the feedback in a PODCAzT.

    The bottom line is, I make these things, put them out there and have little idea if they are making any difference at all.

  4. Serafino says:

    Reverend and dear Father,

    Just a short note to thank you for all the wonderful work in this “labor of love.” I have been celebrating the TLM since the first Sunday of Lent, and have found the “prayer cast” very helpful. You would be surprised, and very happy indeed, at the number of young seminarians who attend the Mass. Keep me in prayer, I will be celebrating my first High Mass on Holy Thursday.

  5. Serafino says:

    Father, will there be a “prayer cast” for Dominica Quarta In Quadragesima? (Laetare Sunday). I need to “practice, practice, practice!” Thanks for the help.