Card. Castrillon Hoyos ordains priests for the FSSP in Lincoln, NE – Extraordinary Rite

[uc]

I’ll begin putting up some images.  Comments to follow.

Let it be said that I am grateful grateful grateful that they simply broadcast the live feed, without commentary over it!

Thank you EWTN.  Thank you!

First, I don’t think Father should have his biretta on, though they are outside.


 


 

 


 

Very properly carrying their birettas.  This is what I call "birettiquette".

They have their stoles, for the imposition of hands and also for reception of Communion.


 

It looks like one of the deacons of honor is a Monsignor, probably a Domestic Prelate. 

 

 

Confiteor Deo Omnipotenti…


For Cardinals, the MC wears the paonazza colored cassock, even if he is not a Monsignor.


 

 The Cardinal is incensed.


 

Not the prettiest cathedral I have ever seen, architecturally, but today, at this moment, it is the most beautiful place in the world. 


Keep in mind who is doing this! 

At the Holy Name…

Great tableaux!
 

 

In choro.


The Epistle.


 
 
 

You can bet these fellows are focused.

Notice they carry the vestments which will be put on them and also lighted candles, as they or their godparents did at baptism.


The Cardinal preaches. 

 
 
 
 
 
 

It is determined if the candidates are worthy.

Then they are called by name.

This is, technically, the moment of vocation.

Until this moment, vocation is theoretical, perhaps felt and reasoned through, but not actualized.

They respond Adsum, "I am present", and come forward.
 
 

The rite begins.

 

The litany of saints is sung with many intercessions.

During the litany the ordinandi prostrate themselves on the floor before the altar.
 

 

The Holy Spirit is called down on the men as they are consecrated. 

The Cardinal lays hands on them, according to Scripture and our apostolic tradition.
 


 Then the priests who are present also impose hands on them.


 

 

 
The ordination prayer continues.


 

They bishop puts the chasuble on them, but the back is folded up until the end of the Mass.

Their stoles are shifted from the manner of a deacon, diagonally, to the manner of a priest.
 

 

You can see how the chasuble is gathered up in back.


 

 

A gremial, apron like cloth is put on the cardinal’s lap for the annointing of the new priest’s hands.

The prayer speaks of their ability to bless and consecrate, to handle holy things.

Their hands are bound with a tergimanium, with which they will clean their hands of the chrism.

Many priests keep theirs and are buried with them.

Our were taken away from us, alas.
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the traditio the priests receive a chalice with wine and the paten with a Host as the sign that they may consecrate the Eucharist.

 
 

Usually you get chrism off your hands with lemons and bread with water.

Time for the Gospel of the Mass.


My friend Fr. Bisig incenses the Evangelarium


 
His Eminence.


 

The schola cantorum.


 


 

A great shot.


 

The Offertory.  Note the bugia… the candle near the missal stand.

 


 
The Canon.


 


 


 


 

Pax tecum.  the newly ordained receive the pax from the Cardinal.

First, the kiss the altar.  They place their hands on it to kiss it, they can do that now.  Both the altar and their hands are annointed, consecrated, with chrism.

In a sense, kissing the altar shows the unity of the priest and the sacrifice.  He, too, is priest and victim as well.


 

The newly ordained receive Communion from the Cardinal. 

Sometime you must pray and wait for the end of something… like…

… the second Confiteor.

Ecce Agnus Dei.

Holy Communion.  Priests wear their stoles when receiving.

Waiting for Holy Communion to be completed.

At the end, the new priests approach the bishop, who lays hands on them again in a sign that they have received the power to forgive sins.

I think this is a good shot, with that window in the background, Christ working through the priest who sanctifies the flock.

Their chasubles are let down in back.

The priests put their hands between those of the bishop and promise obedience.

This is a promise, not a "vow", as many people often say.

They give each other the sign of peace, in the Roman fashion.

Hats on… hats off… it happens often in this rite.

Kissing the altar before the final blessing.

The priests are admonished gravely to make sure they know how to celebrate Mass before they actually do so.

They are admonished to say three Mass for certain intentions.

They are asked to pray for the bishop who just ordained them.

This is still all in Latin, of course.

Finally, they all solemnly sing the Te Deum.

During the Te Deum they kneel at a certain point near the end.

The recessional.

And a final blessing from the bishop/Cardinal outside… rather than in the sacristy.

FacebookEmailPinterestGoogle GmailShare/Bookmark

About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
This entry was posted in SESSIUNCULA. Bookmark the permalink.

84 Responses to Card. Castrillon Hoyos ordains priests for the FSSP in Lincoln, NE – Extraordinary Rite

  1. Tom says:

    Nice to have something nice to say nice things about! Ecce Sacerdos Magnus!

  2. Mark M says:

    I’m watching this live streaming over the Internet. I didn’t get the beginning, though. I do hope some non-streaming will end up floating about… and maybe a DVD? :-D

  3. Cerimoniere says:

    I think the biretta may be worn by those not in sacred vestments when walking in procession outside the church. The exception, of course, would be in a Eucharistic procession.

  4. LCB says:

    I am a bit surprised by Lincoln’s Cathedral.

  5. I take it the FSSP has permission to use the 1962 Ordination Rite… since S.P. omitted that one from the list of sacraments permitted.

  6. Tom says:

    I’ve been following the live coverage with the text…

    http://members.aol.com/liturgialatina/pontificale/020.htm

  7. Geoffrey says:

    I can hear the Canon. Personally, I like that, but isn’t is supposed to be silent?

  8. What a beautiful Mass! What an ugly Cathedral!

  9. Jordanes says:

    Crossreference, in Summorum Pontificum it is stated that the 1962 Roman Missal was never abrogated. Since the rites now deemed an “extraordinary use” of the Roman Rite were never abrogated, it follows that all Latin Rite bishops have the authority to make use of the pre-Vatican II ordination rite.

    Regarding what Summorum Pontificum says of the various sacraments, yes, the ordination rite is not mentioned, because that is not something that the laity may request as their right. No one approaches the Church and asks for ordination — the Church calls men to Holy Orders.

  10. Mark M says:

    I was confused to hear Card. Castrillón-Hoyos saying the Canon out loud. Let’s not read too much into it, though.

    thecrossreference: Yes. FSSP always confers ordination in that form.

  11. Patrick says:

    Why are some of the priests vested in cassock surplice and dalmatic? Shouldn’t they be wearing an alb?

    Just curious…thanks

  12. Dan J says:

    I have a question why is the back of the chasuible pinned up in the rear?

  13. David says:

    Ordination Masses are the one occasion when the Canon is always said aloud in the Traditional Rite.

  14. Geoffrey says:

    I was surprised to hear the “3rd Confiteor” since the PCED confirmed the rubric that forbids it, and the Mass is being said by the president of the PCED himself. Does anyone happen to know where I could find a recording of the Confiteor? I’d like to learn it for when privately praying Compline.

  15. Richard says:

    What a genuine blessing – and on the Feast of the Sacred Heart. This is very clearly to me a pure act of God’s grace.

  16. johnr says:

    How beautiful! Thank you Fr. Z for posting these pictures for us poor-office bound workers. (grin). What a refreshing antidote to the CTA and other puppet “masses.”

    John

  17. Geoffrey says:

    “Ordination Masses are the one occasion when the Canon is always said aloud in the Traditional Rite.”

    Fascinating! :-)

  18. Scott Smith says:

    The Canon is said aloud for those who have just been ordained to the priesthood, perhaps a remnant of concelebration during an ordination Mass.

    Any takers on the chasuble being folded?

  19. Steve Girone says:

    Was this aired on EWTN? If so, does anyone know if it will be rebroadcast?

  20. Aric says:

    My understanding for the practical reason behind the out-loud canon is that the newly ordained concelebrate. (A rare occasion in the classical rite.) Having the canon out-loud keeps everyone on the same “page” — literally or figuratively.

  21. Geoffrey says:

    “Any takers on the chasuble being folded?”

    My GUESS is that it means something like they are’t “quite done yet” until a formal “unpinning.”

  22. Dan J says:

    It is being rebroadcasted at 5/31/08 12:00 AM ET & 9 PM PT. I do like the fact that the Cardinal decided to do the canon out-loud because it is easy to keep up and it throws in the face of the people that say that the “extraordinary rite” is not interactive. I can tell you that I have learned so much from this ordination that I am going to DVR the rebroadcast to help me get better acquainted with this beautiful form of the mass.

  23. I have a question why is the back of the chasuible pinned up in the rear?

    At this point the ordinands have \”only\” received the power to offer sacrifice. Their chasubles will be unpinned later, following the second imposition of hands when they have received the power to forgive sins.

  24. schoolman says:

    My understanding is that the confiteor before communion was retained in the 1962 rubrics for solemn High Mass (like this one) — but ommited only for the low Mass. Maybe someone here can validate that.

  25. MamaJen says:

    Fr. Z, could you explain to us (or point us to an appropriate resource) some of the symbolism we are seeing? The binding of the hands, the pinned vestments (which were just unpinned), that sort of thing? I am watching this with my four young sons, and we are fascinated. I would so like to be able to explain this more fully to them!

  26. Geoffrey,

    The “Third Confiteor” (also known as the “Second Confiteor” when the Priest\’s Confiteor and the common Confiteor from the Prayers at the foot of the Altar are grouped togather) was not present in the 1962 Missale Romanum, but remained in the Ceremoniale Episcoporum, which is used for Pontifical Masses.

  27. Tom S. says:

    I just finished watching the feed. I only get to see it on and off, as I am at work, but even having it in a tiny window on my screen (went full screen for certain parts), with the audio feed, was gorgeous.

    I also would like to add how much I loved actually hearing the canon! I know the tradition and the reasoning behind the silent canon – but it is amazing to actually hear those words be spoken!

  28. joshua says:

    1. The Pontificale Romanum, even in 1964, still had the chanted 2nd (3rd) Confiteor. The Ceremoniale of Bishops is used even for regular priests, for solemn Mass, vespers, etc. despite its name

    2. The folded chasuble, once more common in the old rite (deacons and subdeacons would wear the folded chasuble when black or violet was worn, in the Dominican rite they just went without dalmatic and tunicle), is still employed in the rite of Ordination since their participation in the Mass is 2nd to the Bishop, just as deacons and subdeacons wore it folded to show subordination to the priest. Or at least that is how it was explained to me.

    The catholic encyclopedia has a description in their article on Holy Orders

  29. Al Huntz says:

    I have just read on Angelqueen that the Cardinal said that the priests must concelebrate the chrism Mass in the diocese that they are assigned to. I did not hear that I only heard the Cardinal tell them to take part in the diocese they are assigned to and to accept the Novus Ordo Mass not to say it. Am I wrong?

  30. Gloria says:

    Our FSSP parish, St. Stephen the First Martyr, Sacramento, CA, of course uses the 1962 Missal. While the Confiteor before Communion is not in the Missal, we nevertheless say it at all Masses, Low, Cantata, Solemn. At Low Mass the altar boys recite it as Father receives from the Chalice. Then there is the absolution and Domine non sum dignus for the congregation. It was once explained in a class on the ancient liturgy, that this particular Confiteor is indeed especially for the faithful present to confess and prepare before receiving Holy Communion. Taking it away denies the people the opportunity to reflect on the unworthiness we feel, knowing we are about to receive Christ. While not reciting it aloud, we pray along silently and strike our breasts at the mea culpas. I love the chant of that Confiteor by the Deacon at High Masses. It’s so beautiful and yet simple. I can sing it from memory myself.

  31. “I also would like to add how much I loved actually hearing the canon! I know the tradition and the reasoning behind the silent canon – but it is amazing to actually hear those words be spoken!”

    Do you think you would love it so much if it was done in every single Mass, or is this practice made more beautiful by the fact that it is only done on such a rare and solemn occaision as this?

  32. Lacrimarum Valle says:

    Now, the gloves : the Cardinal is wearing then for the laying on of hands, but then appears to have removed them.
    Does anyone know the reason or tradition for this please?

  33. Al Huntz: During the sermon, the Cardinal said the priests should show respect for the Novus Ordo and also concelebrate at the chrism Mass and other appropriate times.

  34. RBrown says:

    Of the four ordinati, one (Fr McCambridge) is a grad of the Naval Academy (flew supply helicopters) and another (Fr Gordon) the Coast Guard Academy.

    There are three Gordon bros, all now FSSP priests. Of the other (older) two, one is a grad of the CG Academy, the other a grad of the Naval Academy and ex Marine.

  35. Kieran says:

    Wow!!,
    So I didn’t get a chance to see the entire ceremony but what I did see was great. I was lucky enough to be at Ordinations in Gricigliano last year. God Bless Cardinal Hoyos! And he is going to celebrate Mass in England soon. MC1 ‘wore’ the tonsure!

    I was wondering, does anyone know why there was no subdeacon cross bearer?

    Pax

  36. TJM says:

    Father Z, thankyou so much for sharing these absolutely splendid photos of a truly great event in the life of the American Church.Regards, Tom

  37. Tom S. says:

    Jonathan,
    I actually was wondering that to myself as I made that comment, and I decided in the negative. If it were an every day thing it would lose much of the impact. Perhaps once a year, on Easter, would be good. Or maybe, God willing, ordination masses such as this will become a part of every diocese! Wouldn’t THAT be nice!

  38. Mgr Gordon Read says:

    With regard to the Canon said aloud, you can see/hear the same on the DVD of the consecration of the four bishops for SSPX by Archbishop Lefebvre – where, as in priestly ordination, they concelebrate, joining in the words in a low voice and also making the signs of the cross etc.

  39. LCB says:

    Awesome thread. I hate to be a spoil sport, but this highlights the massive theological differences between the EF and the NO.

    In the NO, any john or jane (usually a jane) from the “audience” can come up and play slapstick with the Body and Blood of Christ.

    In the EF, one must be an ordained priest with consecrated hands.

    We have lost something profound.

  40. Was this aired on EWTN? If so, does anyone know if it will be rebroadcast?

    It was broadcast live on EWTN. The only scheduled encore telecast will be at midnight tonight (9 pm Pacific time):

    EWTN 12 am – 4 am (Eastern), Saturday, May 31

    At least, they have that 4-hr block scheduled, though the Mass itself was only 3 hr 20 min.

  41. Scott Smith says:

    perhaps the canon should be sung if it is going to be done aloud.

  42. Beautiful.

    Thank you, very much, for the commentary, Father.

  43. perhaps the canon should be sung if it is going to be done aloud.

    Perhaps we heard it pretty loudly — as we did many of the other “silent prayers” such as those in the Offertory — mainly because of the TV mike. But the celebrating bishop at an ordination Mass need say it only loud enough for the ordinands to hear it as they “concelebrate” (in some sense).

    Since they themselves will always be saying it silently, it would certainly be irrelevant to their “instruction” to hear it sung.

    Perhaps this is a good time for everyone to read

    The Glory of the Silent Canon
    http://www.latin-mass-society.org/canon.htm

    “In the midst of the plethora of beauty and piety that the traditional liturgy encompasses, I would like to single out one aspect that I believe we must always speak of with special emphasis, because it is, stricte dictum, at the very heart of the matter. I refer to the glory of the silent canon.”

  44. curious says:

    Can someone explain (I’m a convert) why the deacons and acolytes sit on the floor surrounding the Cardinal? I see this pretty often but can’t figure out why or what it means. Love the looks of it though!

    Many thanks for your help.

  45. wondering says:

    Can someone explain (I’m a convert) why the deacons and acolytes sit on the floor surrounding the Cardinal? I see this every now and then but can’t figure out why or what it means. Love the looks of it though!

    Many thanks for your help.

  46. LCB,

    No deacons may distribute Communion , and they do not have consecrated hands. Sometimes abbesses in monasteries may handle the Holy Sacrament. But your point is well taken!

  47. The prayer speaks of their ability to bless and consecrate, to handle holy things.

    It may be of interest to mention two separate prayers bestowing priestly powers (taken from the program for the ICK ordinations by Ab. Burke in St. Louis last June). Immediately after the anointing of the hands (before the Gospel) comes the

    Bestowal of the Power to Offer Holy Mass
    “Receive the power to offer sacrifice to God and to celebrate Mass for the living as well as for the dead. In the name of the Lord. Amen.”

    This is where the ordinand receives his folded chasuble.

    Later, in the continuation of the ordination following Holy Communion, comes the

    Bestowal of the Power to Forgive Sins
    “Receive the Holy Ghost; whose sins thou shalt forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins thou shalt retain, they are retained.”

    The new priest’s chasuble is now unfolded.

  48. A Philadelphian says:

    Nothing is a better antidote to liberal heresy than priestly ordinations celebrated with reverence and beauty.

  49. B. says:

    Their hands are bound with a tergimanium, with which they will clean their hands of the chrism.
    Many priests keep theirs and are buried with them.

    I read a description of the ceremonies of priestly ordination written by an FSSP priest and he said that it is given to the mother of the priest and buried with her as a sign that she was the mother of a priest.

    Perhaps that’s just a German custom, though, but I really liked it.

  50. Mark says:

    This is my Cathedral. Yes, its not the gothic or Roman style that was the old Cathedral, but this was consecrated in 1968 by Bishop James Casey, a very progressive bishop who liked modern things. The old Cathedral, downtown, was the traditional style(arches, beatiful stained glass windows, etc) and is now called the Old Cathedral, St. Mary’s.
    The one huge plus of this cathedral is their beautiful organ and the sound it produces. I always love attending a rite just to hear the organ. (and their choir isn’t bad either!)
    I do like the way the FSSP “dress up” this modern monstrosity to make it more spiritually conducive to prayer.

  51. Hoka2_99 says:

    Thank you for the stills! I happened to switch on just at the Special Presentation was beginning and that was it! I sat spellbound for about three and a half hours. I’ve never seen a Tridentine High Mass, not having become a Catholic until 1968. I’ve been to three Low Masses in a local parish, but they were rather disappointing – some of the Mass was gabbled and the Latin almost inaudible and the rest was silent. Today’s Mass with priestly ordinations was new to me and utterly beautiful.
    Only one thing would have been better: a colour film of Benedict XVI’s own priestly ordination in 1951 in that magnificent baroque cathedral in Freising. It would have been the same as the Mass we saw today, I assume. I wonder if such a film exists… or do I just have to dream it?

  52. I read a description of the ceremonies of priestly ordination written by an FSSP priest and he said that it is given to the mother of the priest and buried with her as a sign that she was the mother of a priest.

    I think that’s absolutely beautiful.

  53. Patrick says:

    I heard that the tergimanium is buried with the mother of the priest. When she meets St. Peter at the gates of Heaven, and he asks, “What good works have you done?” she just hands him the cloth and enters Heaven.

  54. I see my pastor right in the center of the picture above the words ECCE AGNUS DEI. He is Father Paul Weinberger. from the Diocese of Dallas

  55. Ken says:

    I learned several things as a result of this thread — good comments today, folks.

  56. Andreas says:

    Parts of this video can be watched over at http://www.gloria.tv

  57. JML says:

    This is from Fr. Trigilio\’s Black Biretta blog on this 20th anniversary:

    \”The Anointing with Chrism and Traditio Instrumentorum (handing of the chalice filled with wine and a paten with a host on it) come next. Pope Pius XII decreed in 1947 (Sacramentum Ordinis) that while an integral part of the ordination rite, the giving of the symbols of office (Book of Gospels for the Deacon; Chalice & Paten for the Priest; Miter & Crosier for Bishop) are not the constitutive elements (matter) of the sacrament. The imposition (laying on) of hands is valid matter. Nevertheless, having your hands anointed by the Bishop almost brought me to tears as you realized this is done to signify that these hands are CONSECRATED so they may be able to CONSECRATE bread & wine into the Precious Body & Blood, Soul & Divinity of Christ. Once a priest\’s hands are anointed, they can never be anointed again. It is permanent like his priesthood. That is why a priest gets the outside of his hands anointed when he receives Anointing of the Sick unlike the laity and religious who get their palms anointed. The priest\’s palms have already been anointed at his ordination. Hence, when a priest is in the hospital, the chaplain has to anoint the forehead and back of the hands. Everyone else gets anointed on the palms. When the priest gives his blessing for the first time to someone during his first year of priesthood, there is a pious custom of kissing the open hands (palms) by the person who was just blessed to show respect for that anointing which took place.

    In the Extraordinary Form (TLM), the priest had his hands tied together with a linen cloth called a maniturgium. This only exposed his thumbs and forefingers after his palms were anointed. Then the Bishop had the priest touch the chalice and paten with his four fingers. This symbolized the importance of what was called the \’canonical digits,\’ i.e., the two fingers on each hand a priest needed to celebrate Mass. In the Ordinary Form (Novus Ordo), the fingers are not tied and the priest is handed the entire chalice and paten. However, many of us still used the maniturgium in that we wiped off the sacred chrism onto this linen and later presented it to our mother\’s at the First Mass the day after Ordination. Pious tradition was that when the mother of a priest died, she was to be buried with the maniturgium used at her son\’s ordination. Then, when she met St. Peter at the pearly gates, he would see the maniturgium and recognize she is the mother of a priest, and then got a first class escort to her heavenly reward. Poor dear old dad got nothing, except the bill for the reception after the First Mass. Today, many priests don\’t want their fathers left out, so when mom gets her maniturgium, dad often gets a small purple stole his son the priest used to hear his first confession.\”

  58. The prayer speaks of their ability to bless and consecrate, to handle holy things.

    It may be of interest to mention two separate prayers bestowing priestly powers (English translations taken from the program for the ICK ordinations by Ab. Burke in St. Louis last June). Immediately after the anointing of the hands (before the Gospel) comes the

    Bestowal of the Power to Offer Holy Mass
    “Receive the power to offer sacrifice to God and to celebrate Mass for the living as well as for the dead. In the name of the Lord. Amen.”

    This is where the ordinand receives his folded chasuble.

    Later, in the continuation of the ordination following Holy Communion, comes the

    Bestowal of the Power to Forgive Sins
    “Receive the Holy Ghost; whose sins thou shalt forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins thou shalt retain, they are retained.”

    The new priest’s chasuble is then unfolded.

  59. Rachel says:

    This is absolutely beautiful! What a blessing and proof of God’s love.
    I imagine these newly ordained priests must be exhausted at the days end! Pray for more priests!!!
    I just adore the part where their hands are bound and when they are prostrate before the altar, it is overwhelmingly beautiful.

  60. PreVatII says:

    RBrown:
    No such thing as an “ex” Marine or “former” Marine. Only those of us on active duty or off active duty. A Marine until you die!
    Semper Fidelis.

  61. Papabile says:

    One thing about the manatergium that people have often forgotten is that it would be made from the baptismal garment of the one who was being ordained. It used to be standard for baptismal garments to be linen, and that is what the manatergium was made of.

    The manatergium was suppressed as an element of ordination when De Ordinatione Episcopi, Presbyterorum, et Diaconorum was published in 1989…. Get that…. only 1989.

    Furthermore… with reference to folded chasubles. It is my understanding that the folding of ordinands chasubles was suppressed prior to 1962, and it can be found in Decrees from the SCR somewhere between 1958 and 1960.

    Therefore, I found it interesting that the head of the PCED would have that custom at kthis ordination.

  62. Kristen says:

    As I looked at the pictures, I was thinking of the ordination scene in “No Business Like Show Business”. That was one of my favorite movies because of the ordination scene.

  63. Franzjosf says:

    A few clarifications:

    1. An ordination in the Old Rite is the only time that the rubrics require concelebration; therefore, the Canon is said a little louder so that all stay together.

    2. The ordinands are not wearing ‘folded chasubles’ in the normal use of that word. Their chasubles are pinned IN THE BACK until a certain moment in the Rite. Folded chasubles were folded up IN THE FRONT and were used in place of violet Dalmatics and Tunicles for most penitential observances and in black for Good Friday until the late 50′s, not sure of the exact date of their suppression. (However, about a month ago they were used at the Pantheon under the protection of ‘immemorial custom’)

    In any case, O how glorious! The fact that the Cardinal came all this way for the Ordinations and the fact that it is being televised more than once ought to worth several bricks!

  64. Papabile says:

    Franzjosf is right about the Mass at the Pantheon.

    Here are a couple of links to youtube videos that show the planeta plicata. (I did note that the Deacon and Subdeacon maintained the oscula while the MC did not…. interesting)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7N0nKzvqrV0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_-kPEIsLeE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvjmkBZFWO0

  65. Vicky says:

    I took the day off from work so that I could attend this Mass today. It was beautiful. It was my first TLM, and I am already wanting to go again.

    This is my Cathedral as well. It is quite “modern” in style, however I don’t think that it is nearly as unattractive as it appears on TV. The stained glass windows are quite lovely, even if they are not traditional in style or shape. The most beautiful of the stained glass is at the back of the church where The Risen Christ is pictured in etched and cut glass against the stained glass on the outside where the Bishops doors are. When the sun shines through it all, it is really very beautiful.

    I think very little has changed at the cathedral since it was opened, other than the change from the original bronze of The Risen Christ to the one that is there currently. I’m not a big fan of the new one.

  66. Ioannes says:

    I was there today, and had the chance to introduce myself to the Cardinal after the ordinations. I am also from Medellin, Colombia, so it was nice to see him so far from our hometown and Rome. I was also confirmed by the late Cardinal Alfonso Lopez Trujillo who passed away earlier this year.

    The Cathedral was standing-room only. I have attended the ordinations for the FSSP for the past 6 years or so, and this was by far the most attended since the seminary opened in Lincoln, NE. The air conditioner quit working overnight, so the heat was extremely uncomfortable, but nobody left their places. A small sacrifice for such a memorable event in these young men’s lives.

    The first Mass for Fr. Dennis Gordon will be a solemn High Mass this Sunday at Immaculate Conception Church in Omaha, NE, with both his brothers (also priests) serving as deacon and subdeacon.

    I hope the live coverage will send a clear message throughout the Catholic world, that Summorum Pontificum is here to stay!

    God Bless all the new ordinandi.

  67. Malta says:

    This is it! This is what we have been waiting for; this IS the legacy of Lefebvre, whether he was a Saint or a disobedient sinner (I believe he will be declared the former, someday).

  68. starchild says:

    Now that’s what I’m talkin about!!!

    Put a glide in your stride and a dip in your hip and come on up to the Mothership.

  69. PAX
    below is some video of the Ordinations. available streaming online for the next month
    http://vocation-station.blogspot.com/2008/02/fssppriesthood.html
    -
    In Jesus Christ our Priest
    HWP

  70. mom of 5 says:

    I am just returning home from all the celebration here today in Lincoln. The Ordination was even more beautiful in person. Yes, our Cathedral isn’t the most awe inspiring, to say the least. But today it truly was a place of great beauty, grace and joy. It was filled to more than capacity. We have celebrated all day and into the evening. We are truly blessed. Thank you for posting. A lot of the symbolism and reasons for certain things.. e.g.. the Canon being “out loud” and such, were explained to those of us there in the program. Please pray for these newly ordained as the offer their first Masses here tomorrow and begin yet another day of celebration and parties. One of them will be having a first Holy Communion at his First Mass and another is performing a baptism as well. Thanks be to God for the gift of the priesthood.

  71. Clayton says:

    It should be mentioned that, according to the tradition of Conciliar Canons going back to the early days of the church, when a prayer is said “secreto” it should be loud enough for the ministers to hear it being spoken. Hence, a mike would be sufficient to amplify the prayers where all could hear. Of course, the Canon in an elevated voice is a tradition for ordination masses as has been stated above. I have heard the symbolism explained this way: the bishop is teaching the ordinati how to say mass, just as Jesus taught his apostles to say mass in the upper room. Finally, in televised and radio masses, Vatican instructions have always encouraged the priest’s prayers to be said more clearly so that those watching could derive greater benefit (although it would take me a bit of time to find the reference).

    I do wish that the Cardinal had at least mentioned that both the Second Vatican Council and the Code of Canon Law state that concelebration is entirely in the discretion of the priest and no priest can be made to concelebrate. My FSSP chaplain reminded me of this this evening. However, provided that the Mass is celebrated with appropriate dignity and without abuse, I could definitely understand the gesture of Fraternity priests concelebrating when invited by their bishop.

  72. Christopher says:

    for anyone that is interested I have some video that I took from the Ordinations of the ICRSS in Saint Louis Last year.

    Im not a choir member , or a professional cameraman but I have it up on my blog anyway.

    http://www.lostlambs.net

    as as Side note, I also know 2 of the Gordon brothers as well, and keep them in my prayers

    Pax Tecum

  73. LCB says:

    Mom of 5′s comment is interesting:

    Isn’t it interesting how a reverent liturgy, conducted respectfully according to the rubrics, transforms even an unaesthetic location?

    Some of the best masses I’ve been to were in, frankly, ugly locations. However, the liturgy was conducted with great reverence, and steps were taken to emphasize the sacred character of what was taking place (despite the ugly location).

  74. Matt T. says:

    Thank you Fr. Z. for this awesome post. I find it fitting that on your blog this ordination should be posted above the info on the women’s ordination in Canada. I don’t know if it’s coincidence or you planned it that way. But the FSSP ordination shows the real power and glory of the Church!

  75. thetimman says:

    The second confiteor, the immemorial custom that, thankfully, just keeps going…

  76. Habemus Papam says:

    Malta; My thoughts exactly.

  77. From Lincoln says:

    Deo gratias!

    Thank you so much, Fr. Z, for sharing these pictures! I am from Lincoln but am currently out of town and therefore unable to attend the ordinations and the pictures allowed me to partake in the festivities at least a bit!

    Concerning the Monsignor in attendance, he is indeed a diocesan priest…in fact he is the Vicar General of the diocese. Your readers may be interested to know that he is the chaplain at a Carmelite monastery near Lincoln (Agnew, NE) that celebrates only the TLM. Their recently built chapel is quite exquisite and the presence of these beautiful nuns in our diocese is a real blessing. In addition to Msgr. Thorburn, I spotted at least one other diocesan priest celebrating in choir.

    The presence of the FSSP in the Diocese of Lincoln is a real blessing and the source of great joy for me personally. What an occasion of joy!

  78. Franzjosf says:

    In the above post I mentioned a ‘few’ clarification, then only wrote two.

    3. More than six candles may be used. Most often on festal occasions I’ve seen ten.

    4. A separate issue is a seventh candle which is used by an ordinary in his canonical territory. I was under the impression the Cardinals could use the seventh candle anywhere, but I may be mistaken on that point.

  79. Antiquarian says:

    Nice to see the Knight of the Holy Sepulchre there in one of the Communion pictures. They are a pretty frequent presence at such events here in DC, and I wasn’t sure if that was so elsewhere.

  80. ThomasB says:

    We drove 1000 miles round trip because a friend was being ordained. It was worth every tiring mile, and many came from much further away. Thanks, Fr. Z, for posting this, as I arrived right at 10am, and had to stand and kneel behind the last row of pews, so I could not see (or, at times, even hear) much of the detail. Father (!) McCambridge gave my daughter and me his “first blessing”! A wonderful day. I could not help but tear up a little at times (especially at the Te Deum, realizing the significance of this. Choir and schola were magnificent, too.

    As an aside, we had stayed the night in Kearney, NB, arriving just after a monster tornado had struck parts of the town. The damage was pretty widespread, but the front had passed by the time we arrived.

  81. John says:

    Patrick,

    The honorary deacons and the assistant priest wear surplice (or rochet),
    amice and either dalmatic or cope. This is prescribed by the Caeremoniale
    Episcoporum. They are not officers of the Mass (they are really attendants
    to the bishop), so they do not wear alb,
    stole or maniple. In Rome, the honorary deacons were always Cardinal
    Deacons at a papal Mass

    John P

  82. Archbishop Ranjith’s bookbearer et al. did not wear copes (see http://thenewliturgicalmovement.blogspot.com/2008/05/mgr-ranjith-pontifical-mass-blue.html). Is there some rule as to doing it one way or the other?

  83. Zach says:

    Fr. Z,

    Why would you pray for the end of the second (third) confetior? Shouldn’t we be praying for its restoration?