PRAYERCAzT 25: Preface of Easter – Missale Romanum 1962 & 2002

Welcome to another rapid installment of What Does the Prayer Really Sound Like? 

Today we will hear the Preface of Easter as it is in the 1962 Missale Romanum as well as the 2002 edition.  I speak the Preface and then sing it in the Solemn Tone.  I use the text as it is during Easter Season rather than as it is on Easter Sunday or the Octave.


http://www.wdtprs.com/prayercazt/090504_easter_preface.MP3

If priests who are learning to say the older form of Holy Mass can get these prayers in their ears, they will be able to pray them with more confidence. So, priests are my very first concern. 

However, these audio projects can be of great help to lay people who attend Holy Mass in the Traditional, or extraordinary form: by listening to them ahead of time, and becoming familiar with the sound of the before attending Mass, they will be more receptive to the content of the prayers and be aided in their full, conscious and active participation.

My pronunciation of Latin is going to betray something of my nationality, of course. Men who have as their mother tongue something other than English will sound a little different.  However, we are told that the standard for the pronunciation of Latin in church is the way it is spoken in Rome.  Since I have spent a lot of time in Rome, you can be pretty sure my accent will not be too far off the mark.

Let your priest friends know this resource is available. 

Pray for me, listen carefully, and practice practice practice.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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One Response to PRAYERCAzT 25: Preface of Easter – Missale Romanum 1962 & 2002

  1. Fr. Charles says:

    Thank you very much; this is very helpful for someone like me trying to learn the EF, especially with the very clear pronunciation. I have a lot of Latin experience (at least among my priest peers) but not a lot of experience speaking and singing it.

    It’s very true about getting it “in the ears.” But this isn’t just for priests; I remember having the preface dialogue in my ears as a catechumen, and having it come back to me as a short prayer in the course of those days. As one of our music teachers in the Order likes to say, “No one leaves Mass humming the homily.”