SALE alert! Benedict XVI’s vol 1 of Jesus of Nazareth

When I was writing a response to an email query, I looked up a link for Pope Benedict XVI’s book Jesus of Nazareth (Vol. 1)

I found that – at the time of this writing – it is on sale (at least for US buyers) through Amazon. Hardcover – $9.98.

If you don’t have the book, I suggest thinking about getting it at this price.  A good gift, perhaps.  Have an extra copy to mark up as you read.

His Holiness’ book has one of the best explanations of the uses of and limitations of the so-called historical-critical approach to Scripture, how divine inspiration worked, and very useful material for reflection on, for example, the Lord’s temptations in the desert.

FYI & FWIW

And don’t forget to refer to Benedict XVI as the "Pope of Christian Unity".

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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13 Responses to SALE alert! Benedict XVI’s vol 1 of Jesus of Nazareth

  1. AnAmericanMother says:

    This is an excellent book. I have enjoyed it, and it is worthwhile to re-read it to catch points you may have missed the first time through.

    It also is a great conversation starter. I was reading it for the first time while on jury duty, and it sparked some very interesting discussions in the jury assembly room. Cordial, I might add!

  2. wmeyer says:

    I have read it, and am due to read it again — excellent book, as are all those by Pope Benedict which have read so far. If you’re ordering this one, get his Spirit of the Liturgy, too.

    And by a different author, but in the spirit of one brick at a time, consider getting Ralph McInerny’s What Went Wrong with Vatican II.

  3. Bos Mutissimus says:

    ALERT! It is also on sale via B&N for $3.99 (hb) on clearance. PB version is about $12.00 by contrast. Again, at the time of this writing….

    My wife & I are reading it now; I concur that the outline of historical-critical scholarship in the beginning is very valuable to point out both its utility & its limitations.

  4. Midwest St. Michael says:

    For those of you who may be intimidated by Pope Benedict’s writings (before tackling “Jesus of Nazareth”), I suggest getting Scott Hahn’s “Covenant and Communion: The Biblical Theology of Pope Benedict XVI.”

    This is a tremendous book by Dr. Hahn – and he gives copious quotes from BXVI on the *overuse* (read – *eclusive* use) of certain exegetes/theologians/scholars of the so-called historical-critical method of biblical interpretation.

    Dr. Hahn gives the reader the prooftexts they need to defend our fatih from those who tend to want to deny certain biblical teachings of the faith (i.e. the Ressurection, Jesus’ Divinity, etc.).

    It is only about 180 pages and is well worth the price.

  5. AnAmericanMother says:

    Is Volume Two available yet?

    If it’s only available in German, where is it sold?

  6. Martial Artist says:

    I just bought it new from one of the several booksellers on Amazon Marketplace (the listing was “n copies from $5.33 new” at the book’s web page on Amazon). I saw those when I fathered the link that Fr. Z provided in the post. I have had quite good results using Amazon Marketplace merchants, but I do rely on the ratings of the sellers.

    Pax et bonum,
    Keith Töpfer

  7. robtbrown says:

    For those of you who may be intimidated by Pope Benedict’s writings (before tackling “Jesus of Nazareth”), I suggest getting Scott Hahn’s “Covenant and Communion: The Biblical Theology of Pope Benedict XVI.”

    This is a tremendous book by Dr. Hahn – and he gives copious quotes from BXVI on the overuse (read – eclusive use) of certain exegetes/theologians/scholars of the so-called historical-critical method of biblical interpretation.
    Comment by Midwest St. Michael

    He’s very good on the critique of the historial-critical method. His Eucharistic Theology, however, leaves a lot to be desired.

  8. wmeyer says:

    Hahn is by no means perfect, but as an alternative to Fr. McBrien, he’s pretty nearly perfect.

    I’d consider Hahn to be a good starting point.

    As to being intimidated by Pope Benedict’s writings, I see no reason to be. The worst that can happen is that you don’t appreciate the full import of his points. But that leaves room for future discoveries in successive readings.

  9. jesusthroughmary says:

    For Don’t forget “FTW” and “FCFS”.

  10. jesusthroughmary says:

    Please disregard the first word in the previous post, so that it becomes coherent.

  11. robtbrown says:

    Hahn is by no means perfect, but as an alternative to Fr. McBrien, he’s pretty nearly perfect.

    I don’t think theologians should be judged according to their relevance to the irrelevant Fr Richard McBrien,


    I’d consider Hahn to be a good starting point.
    Comment by wmeyer

    For what?

  12. Konichiwa says:

    Fr. Z, I had just purchased it days ago for that price. I also got his book Spirit of the Liturgy, along with Padre Pio Miracle Man. I appreciate bringing sales like this to our attention :D