Status blogi quaestionis

I am pleased to report that there were some 60 comments on the entry to "name" the upcoming Motu Proprio to derestrict the older form of Mass.  Some of the proposals are pretty creative and very funny.  Others are rather sad, reflecting the pain of the many years of suffering from abuses and disrespect from pastors of souls who have lacked compassion and flexibility.

The server problem that was causing the blog to freeze and that pesky WordPress error page to pop up seems to have been resolved.  It was an SQL problem (and not my fault!).

A couple more of you have kindly sent donations through the button on the sidebar.  Thanks!  It all helps.

Since installing the word verification plugin (to thwart the slime peddlers) there has not been a single spam comment requiring my electronic portculis to slam shut.  Victory!   I added a few new terms today, which am sure you will eventually see.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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5 Responses to Status blogi quaestionis

  1. Tim says:

    Father, happy to hear you made it back safe and sound. I would have asked this in e-mail, as it’s a bit off-topic, but I couldn’t find your address. Why is it that many Diocesan Priests that love the TLM and pray for its freedom still often still pray the Novus Ordo versus Populum, on a table altar (instead of a high altar), and utilizing lay lectors? I imagine the circumstances could vary greatly, but do Bishops often require the Novus Ordo to be celebrated in the new manner, in so many ways opposed to the rubrics of the TLM (recognizing that it is not the TLM)? How is it that these things have become so seemingly mandatory? I understand how Diocesan Priests are between a proverbial rock and a hard place with their Bishops in being forced to celebrate the Novus Ordo, but why does it ever have to be celebrated in the manner described above? This has confounded me, but I am interested in hearing what you have to say about it.

    God Bless!

  2. Argent says:

    It was an SQL problem (and not my fault!)

    I SQL, you SQL, we all SQL for motu proprio. ;) (rhymes it not, but we await for the squealing with delight soon)

    Enjoy your “datagathering”.

  3. When asked about the motu proprio as he was walking into St. Peter’s on New Year’s Eve, Cardinal Castrillon Hoyos is reported to have given a one-word reply: “Subito.”

    In this context, would its sense be “immediately”? Or just “suddenly” (though perhaps still far in the future)?

  4. RBrown says:

    When asked about the motu proprio as he was walking into St. Peter’s on New Year’s Eve, Cardinal Castrillon Hoyos is reported to have given a one-word reply: “Subito.”

    In this context, would its sense be “immediately”? Or just “suddenly” (though perhaps still far in the future)?

    In Italian means “immediately”, in Latin “suddenly”.

    Having established that, my experience in Roman restaurants is when we asked for the check, the response often was subito.

    The check would arrive about 15 minutes later . . . suddenly.

  5. Henry: What RBrown writes is spot on. “Subito is a dangerous word in Italian. The restaurant example is perfect. When you hear subito you never know what is going to happen. However, this was not an Italian speaking. The tone of voice, body language, etc., in that occasion was everything. It might actually have been a pretty comical riposte!