” … now in force…”

Folks, remember that with 14 September not only the provisions of Summorum Pontificum are in force.

The Rules are now in force too.

Fr. Z’s 5 Rules of Engagement now that the Motu Proprio is in force:

1) Rejoice because our liturgical life has been enriched, not because "we win".  Everyone wins when the Church’s life is enriched.  This is not a "zero sum game".

2) Do not strut.  Let us be gracious to those who have in the past not been gracious in regard to our "legitimate aspirations".

3) Show genuine Christian joy.  If you want to attract people to what gives you so much consolation and happiness, be inviting and be joyful.  Avoid the sourness some of the more traditional stamp have sadly worn for so long.

4) Be engaged in the whole life of your parishes, especially in works of mercy organized by the same.  If you want the whole Church to benefit from the use of the older liturgy, then you who are shaped by the older form of Mass should be of benefit to the whole Church in concrete terms.

5) If the document doesn’t say everything we might hope for, don’t bitch about it like a whiner.  Speak less of our rights and what we deserve, or what it ought to have been, as if we were our own little popes, and more about our gratitude, gratitude, gratitude for what God gives us.

 

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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15 Responses to ” … now in force…”

  1. Malta says:

    Good points. I do think we need to avoid sourness and an unjoyful attitude. On the other hand, Summorum Pontificum is a band-aid on a gaping wound now afflicting the Church: modernism. I do think, however, that it is better than no band-aid, and there is the possibility–perhaps not a great possibility–that it will be a catalyst to a true renewal of holiness and a sense of the sacred in the Church.

  2. Michael says:

    I must say, as one who really has no interest in the “Extraordinary Rite” I have to admire your “rules”.

    I say, let those of us who prefer, want, desire, demand the “Novus Ordo” live in peace with people like yourselves. We are ALL CATHOLICS.

    Thanks!

  3. danphunter1 says:

    Michael,
    Have you ever assisted,at more than one Classical Rite?
    And if so, why do you have no interest in it?
    Christ sure as heck does.
    God bless you.

  4. Peter says:

    Thanks for the rules Father. Like Michael, I have no interest in the Extraordinary Rite. Too bad you did not post these rules a month ago – some of your posts and some of the associated comments could have used them!

  5. Peter says:

    Thanks for the rules Father. Like Michael, I have no interest in the Extraordinary Rite. Too bad you did not post these rules a month ago – some of your posts and some of the associated comments could have used them.

  6. Andrew says:

    Michael:

    … as one who really has no interest in the “Extraordinary Rite”

    I understand what you’re saying and I accept it respectfully: but still, don’t you think it is an odd way of putting it? Would you say that about any other legitimate liturgical rite of the Church (Chaldean, Byzantine, Melkite, etc)?
    I’ve never attended any liturgies in any rite other than Roman, but I would never say that “I have no interest” in other rites, since each rite is a celebration of the same mystery. In fact, I have great interest in every rite and I would love to experience every one of them.

    Isn’t it demeaning to say “I have no interest.”?

  7. mwa says:

    Dear Peter,
    Perhaps you do not read here often. Fr. Z posted these rules on June 28 of this year, and has reminded his readers of them often since the publishing of “Sum. Pont.” They also have their own link in the pages section on the left sidebar, to be sure that everyone has a chance to absorb them.

  8. Jordan Potter says:

    Peter said: Too bad you did not post these rules a month ago – some of your posts and some of the associated comments could have used them.

    In fact he posted them prior to 7 July, and has reposted them several times since.

    Which posts of Fr. Zuhlsdorf’s did you have in mind? I recall some comments posted here that ran up against The Rules of Engagement, but I don’t recall anything like that from Fr. Z.

  9. Tom says:

    For the sake of folks like Michael and Peter (who so clearly prefer the Ordinary Rite), perhaps Fr. Z could post 5 similar rules of engagement.

    The rules could read something like this:

    1) Rejoice because our liturgical life has been enriched.

    2) Be gracious to those who have in the past been denied access to this rite by their local ordinaries in spite of their “legitimate aspirations”.

    3) Show genuine Christian joy. Avoid the sourness some of the more liberal stamp have sadly worn for so long.

    4) Be engaged in the whole life of your parishes, especially if your pastor decides to celebrate a Mass using the 1962 Missal. You who are shaped by the newer form of Mass should be not simply tolerant of, but accepting and embracing toward those of more traditional leanings.

    5) If the document says more than you had hoped for, don’t bitch about it like a whiner. Speak less of your rights and what you deserve, or what it ought to have been, as if you were your own little pope, and more about your gratitude, gratitude, gratitude for what God gives us.

  10. Xavier says:

    Which posts of Fr. Zuhlsdorf’s did you have in mind?

    I nominate the thread “I don’t think the Palantir had barcodes” (started on Our Lady’s birthday no less). I found this uncharitable critique of the Holy Father’s charitable choice of vestments very disrespectful.

    And here I am critiquing a priest! Isn’t there something wrong with this whole blog? Who gives those under authority the authority to judge the actions of those above them in authority?

  11. Jordan Potter says:

    The “Palantir” thread and the ghastly papal vestments thread have nothing to do with Summorum Pontificum, so they don’t qualify as a violation of the Rules of Engagement pertaining to the motu proprio.

  12. Xavier: You are welcome to read and comment elsewhere if you are uncomfortable with any aspect of this blog. Ciao.

  13. Peter says:

    MWA wrote…

    “Perhaps you do not read here often. Fr. Z posted these rules on June 28 of this year…”

    Oh, I read this blog often and I do not care if he wrote it a year ago. Here is a link to a glaring example that got my dander up (sorry for the lack of html skills)…

    http://wdtprs.com/blog/2007/08/all-liturgies-in-the-diocese-of-gaylord-are-to-be-celebrated-entirely-in-english/

    … some of these posters should be ashamed of themselves. You will not find much charity on that thread.

    Oddly appropriate; the Anti Spam Word here was “Pray for our Bishops”

  14. Peter says:

    … and to Tom:

    My, do you call that comment charitable and joyous? I have question for you:

    Is the “Novo Ordo” (Ordinary) Rite less of a sacrament?

  15. Jordan Potter says:

    Sorry, Peter, I don’t see how Fr. Z’s comments about the Bishop of Gaylord’s abuse of his authority violate his five rules of engagement (though some of the commenters probably crossed the line). I don’t see any lack of charity or joy in Tom’s post above either. What did Tom say that would make you question whether or not he believes the New Mass is any less a sacrament?