PRAYERCAzT 01: 20th Sunday after Pentecost – 1962 Missale Romanum

Welcome to the inaugural installment of What Does the (Latin) Prayer Really Sound Like? 

In this new audio project I will simply read, or maybe sometimes sing, the Latin prayers of the upcoming Sunday or feast from the 1962 Missale Romanum

This is a service for priests who want to use the 1962 Missale Romanum.

But it is also a service for lay people who attend the other form of Mass. If people hear these prayers ahead of time, and get them in their ears and hearts, their active participation at Mass is made that much more profound.  Active participation, as the Church desires, is first and foremost active receptivity.

Since Pope Benedict’s Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum is now in force, there is some consideration being given to what qualifications a priest must have to be able to celebrate the older form of Mass. 

Aside from knowledge of the rubrics, he must at least, according to commonsense, be able to pronounce the Latin prayers properly. 

In my experience, however, not all priests who know how to celebrate the older form of Mass always have the best pronunciation. 

Here’s where I can help a little.  If you priests out there can get the prayers into your ears before you have to sing or say them, you might be a little more comfortable and confident as you are celebrating Holy Mass and the people will be all the more edified.

My pronunciation of Latin is going to betray something of my nationality, of course. Men who have as their mother tongue something other than English will sound a little different.  However, we are told that the standard for the pronunciation of Latin in church is the way it is spoken in Rome.  Since I have spent a lot of time in Rome, you can be pretty sure my accent will not be too far off the mark.

I will simply read the prayers as they are on the page.

I read them more slowly than we would ordinarily read them during Mass.  But hopefully the pace helped you hear the words a little more clearly.  

If this was useful to you, let your priest friends know this resource is available.  And feel free to make a little donation using the donation button on the left side bar of the blog or or by clicking here.  This is a labor of love, but those donations really help.

Until next week, pray for me and practice practice practice.


20th Sunday after Pentecost

Missa "Omnia, quae fecisti nobis"

INTROIT:  
Omnia, quae fecisti nobis, Dómine, in vero iudício fecístì, quia peccávimus tibi, et mandátis tuis non obedívimus: sed da glóriam nómini tuo, et fac nobíscum secúndum multitúdinem misericórdiae tuae. Beáti immaculáti in via: qui ámbulant in lege Dómini. v. Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto. Sicut erat in principio et nunc et semper et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
 Omnia, quae fecisti nobis…

COLLECT:
Largíre, quaesumus Dómine, fidélibus tuis indulgéntiam placátus, et pacem: ut páriter ab ómnibus mundéntur offénsis, et secúra tibi mente desérviant. Per Dóminum nostrum Iesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.

EPISTLE:   
Léctio Epístolae beáti Pauli Apóstoli ad Ephesios. Fratres, Vidéte quomodo caute ambulétis: non quasi insipiéntes, sed ut sapiéntes: rediméntes tempus, quoniam dies mali sunt. Proptérea nolíte fieri imprudéntes, sed intellegéntes quae sit volúntas Dei. Et nolíte inebriári vino, in quo est luxúria, sed implémini Spíritu Sancto, loquéntes vobismetípsis in psalmis, et hymnis, et cánticis spirituálibus, cantántes, et psalléntes in córdibus vestris Dómino, grátias agéntes semper pro ómnibus, in nómine Dómini nostri Iesu Christi Deo et Patri. Subiécti ínvicem in timóre Christi.

GRADUAL:
Oculi ómnium in te sperant, Dómine: et tu das illis escam in témpore opportúno. Aperis tu manum tuam, et imples omni ánimal benedictióne. Allelúia, allelúia. Parátum cor meum, Deus, parátum cor meum, cantábo, et psallam tibi, glória mea. Allelúia.

GOSPEL:
In illo témpore: Erat quidam régulus, cuius fílius infirmabátur Caphárnaum. Hic cum audísset, quia Iesus adveníret a iudaea in Galilaeam, ábiit ad eum: et rogábat eum ut descénderet et sanáret fílium eius: incipiébat enim mori. Dixit ergo Iesus ad eum: Nisi signa, et prodígia vidéritis, non créditis. Dicit ad eum régulus: Dómine, descénde priúsquam moriétur fílius meus. Dicit ei Iesus: "Vade fílius tuus vivit." Crédidit homo sermóni, quem dixit ei Iesus, et ibat. iam autem eo descendénte, servi occurrérunt eí, et nuntiavérunt dicéntes, quìa fílius eius víveret. Interrogábat ergo horam ab eis, in qua mélius habúerit. Et dixérunt ei: Quia heri hora séptima reliquit eum febris. Cognóvit ergo pater, quia illa hora erat, in qua dixit ei Iesus: Fílius tuus vivit: et crédidit ipse, et domus eius tota.

OFFERTORY:  
Super flumina Babylónis illic sédimus, et flevimus, dum recordémur tui, Sion.

SECRET
Caeléstem nobis praebeant haec mysteria, quaesumus Dómine, medicínam: et vitia nostri cordis expúrgent. Per Dóminum nostrum Iesum Christum, Filium Tuum, Qui Tecum vivit et regnat in unitate Spiritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.

COMMUNION:
Meménto verbi tui servo tuo, Dómíne, in quo mihí spem dedísti: haec me consoláta est in humilitáte mea.

POSTCOMMUNION
Ut sacris, Dómine, reddámur digni munéribus: fac nos, quaesumus, tuis semper obedíre mandátis. Per Dóminum nostrum Iesum Christum Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus,
Per omnia saecula saeculorum.


And don’t forget to check out the PODCAzTs!

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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62 Responses to PRAYERCAzT 01: 20th Sunday after Pentecost – 1962 Missale Romanum

  1. William says:

    My wife just walked in and exclaimed. “This is great! Tell him to do it every Sunday!”

  2. CarpeNoctem says:

    May I suggest, “Say the black” is all in black and “do the red” is all in red? Curious how in four or more years of seminary formation one can forget that one simple rule!

  3. Fr. John says:

    Fr. Z , This is an incredible and much needed service that you are doing for us priests. Thank you every so much!!! Yesterday I was listening to the CD given me by the FSSP with all of the spoken mass parts for Trinity Sunday and I was wishing and hoping that some one would do this very thing. God Bless you

  4. Carlos says:

    If you – or any of your readers – want, I have made a few years ago a PDF file to make a bumper sticker with the same basic idea. You can get it at
    http://www.hsjonline.com/rednblck.pdf

    There is also a JPEG version at http://www.hsjonline.com/imagens/redandblack.jpg

    Your brother in Christ,

    Carlos

  5. Fr. John: Thanks and spread the word!

  6. Vincenzo says:

    CarpeNoctem wrote: “May I suggest, “Say the black” is all in black and “do the red” is all in red? Curious how in four or more years of seminary formation one can forget that one simple rule!”

    http://i22.tinypic.com/1smbe0.png

  7. Jason says:

    May God bless Fr. Z and all the priests who are making an effort to broaden their understanding of the Mass in all its forms.

    Amen,

  8. Stu says:

    But Father, But Father…How about us altar boys (err..uhmm…men)? I would love to see you read the responses so that we can emulate the accent as well. :)

    Father John, good to see all is going well.

  9. Fr. John says:

    Stu, haha good one, nice to see your comments, my blessing to you and your family.

    Fr. John

  10. Stu: Would you… or anyone… like to hear an audio project to teach the ordinary prayers for Mass?

  11. Rafael says:

    Father, I offer myself to help in these. Being of a latin-language mother tongue, we can help pronouncing the language more correctly (yes, your accent still betrays you although you are better than the average American – just compare with the St. John Cantius’ video tutorial :-) – the Roman way.

  12. Geoffrey says:

    Wonderful! I am not a priest, but wish to greatly improve my Latin! Thank you, Father!

  13. Geoffrey says:

    Wonderful! I am not a priest, but wish to greatly improve my Latin skills! Thank you, Father!

  14. canon1753 says:

    Thank you for this service. Yes, I am going to donate to this project. (That is justice, not Catholic Guilt).

  15. Stu says:

    Father, absolutely!

  16. Resonare Christum says:

    Fr. Z said: Stu: Would you… or anyone… like to hear an audio project to teach the ordinary prayers for Mass?

    I vote yes!!!!

    Thank you, Fr. Z., for all that you do for the Church.

  17. Jonathan Bennett says:

    Thank you Father! Your podcasts are not only a good resource for priests, but also for Altar servers. Perhaps you can do a special podcast on the Ordinary of the Mass geared towards servers.

  18. Berolinensis says:

    This is certainly a valuable help, especially for those who never really studied Latin (although, and I hope this does not come off as arrogant, Latin pronunciation is really easy, as it is completely regular, there is a small number of rules, which always apply without exception).
    As to “Roman” pronunciation: I can really only speak for German speaking countries (although I believe in England at least a conscious choice was made in the 19th century to use Italian pronunciation to manifest unity with Rome and differentiate the true Church from the Anglicans). But in Germany, a “German” pronunciation exists (which, linguist say, is closer in some aspects to the Roman original than the Italian pronunciation) which has been used continuously for hundreds and hundreds of years, not only in Church, but remember that Latin was the language used at University, at practicing law, science etc. until the 18th century. It was the language used in seminaries until well into the 1960s. So, at least in Germany, I prefer the German pronunciation of Latin over the Italian, because it connects me to tradition, while the Italian feels artificial, as it is mostly used for concertant performances of classical Masses etc.
    I would be interested to know how this is seen in other countries.

  19. Andrew says:

    When it comes to Latin, folks are ready to have endless discussions about minute details of what is “proper” and suitable and authoritative. But give them actual live Latin and most of them fall asleep.

    What is needed instead, and Fr. Z. takes the bull by the horns here, is live Latin to start a process where folks are not afraid of it. Priests need to know that Latin is a language. And like any language, the main purpose of it is communication. It can be pronounced, like any language (English is a good example) in varied ways – none of them holding a definitive primacy. Fr. Z’s pronunciation is the one inherited and preserved in the Catholic Church from late antiquity. While there are other modes of pronunciation, entirely legit (Caesar, Sesar, Sisar, Tsesar, etc.) I would encourage anyone starting out to learn the Church’s way. Its our heritage.

    Yet, perhaps more important than pronunciation is the capacity to engage the listener, and that can ONLY be achieved by someone who understand what he’s saying. Otherwise, the words sound hollow and lifeless.

  20. Sid Cundiff says:

    Father Z and any of y’all:

    First thanks for this splendid addition. An aide for the eye and the ear!

    Pardon me for being a newster. I have just read that the server alone says the responses. When I attended the MEF at the FSSP church San Gregorio on a weekday in Rome, this is indeed what was done. Our local priest for the MEF is helping all present to say them. I’ve seen this elsewhere. Our bishop, or so is my guess, might like this too. I haven’t see a rule on this. What is to be preferred?

  21. Brilliant Father! Thank you! I hope that you will continue this each week.

    I might even go out and buy an I-Pod if this keeps up!

  22. Jonathan Bennett says:

    Excuse me if I do not know the technical terms, but would it be right to say that Latin is pronounced from further back in the mouth while English is pronounced from the front of the mouth?

  23. Henry Edwards says:

    Father Z: “But these projects are really intended for priests, who need to say the prayers out loud.”

    But don’t we all? How else can we prepare for active participation by “praying with the Priest the holy words said by him” (as urged by Pius X) at Sunday Mass than by studying the Latin propers and prayers in advance and absorbing their meaning so that it will be conscious as we hear them at Mass.

    And who can study these Latin propers and prayers without saying them aloud for first familiarity? And then seeing whether we can indeed comprehend their meaning as Father Z recites them in Latin so much better than our own meager efforts?

    So won’t these PRAYERCAzTs be just as valuable for us laymen as for priests? And so isn’t the Donate button meant as much for us as for them? (Or am I following this train of thought a bit too far?)

    Seriously, Father Z, I hope you can gravitate toward posting each Sunday’s PrayerCazt a bit earlier during the preceding week so we have plenty of time to use it profitably.

  24. John says:

    Fr. Z, this is a very good service. What would really be great is a sung version with the solemn tones that the SSPX and FSSP are known for using. The orations and readings are particularly beautiful in those tones, but unfortunately, very few priests seem to know them.

  25. Henry: But don’t we all? 

    You have a good point.  If people hear these prayers ahead of time, and get them in their ears and hearts, their active participation at Mass is made that much more profound.  Active participation, as the Church desires, is first and foremost active receptivity.

  26. Steve Girone says:

    Great, Great, Great….Great for Priests who will need to pray these prayers. Great
    for us laymen who will also benefit from praying the prayers of the Mass ahead of tim
    time. And, finally, great for the Church as we grow together in holiness. Can I put
    in a plug for “Do the Red, Read the Black” as a possible name or tagline
    for your blog…it speaks volumes to me.

  27. Little Gal says:

    This recording is very helpful. Perhaps this is too basic, but I am taking a liturgial Latin (1) course that focuses only on reading and translation. Note: we are using the Collin’s book. I would also appreciate an audio of the sounds of the individual letters in the alphabet. Just rooting these sounds in mein Kopf would be very helpful. Also, does anyone know of audio tapes for liturgical Latin with an Italianate pronunciation?

  28. Paul Murnane says:

    Stu: Would you… or anyone… like to hear an audio project to teach the ordinary prayers for Mass?

    Absolutely, Father. Thank you! May God bless you and all your work.

  29. Steve: I will take your request under advisement as I prepare a new WordPress theme for the blog.

  30. Rob F. says:

    Hi Father,

    Thanks for this very valuable service! Though I am not a priest, my family does pray the ordinary from Vespers in Latin, and its good to hear someone besides ourselves speak it.

  31. Thank you so much! Do you ever envision making some of your podcazts available on CD for those of us who are technically challenged? And one quick question relating to the SSPX. I’ve heard that their confessions, marriages and confirmations are not valid. Is this true? We have an SSPX retreat house nearby—the priests are some of the most helpful and pious priests I’ve met. Thank you for your good and holy work.

  32. Jim says:

    Hey, Fr. Z. Try out this new Latin verb: blovio, bloviare (1st conjugation) — To cause global warming through release of hot air, a la Al Gore.

  33. Sean says:

    I think there must be a difference between pronunciation (saying the -ce-, -gn-, -z-, etc correctly) and intonation. Though I have aways heard correct Roman pronunciation at mass (as opposed to the ‘pronounce it as if it were English’ tendency prevalent elsewhere) I have never heard the very Italian ‘mama mia’ intonation as used in the podcast. In my opinion it would sound like a very strange flourish coming from the mouth of an English priest.

  34. Sean: You are perfectly welcome to make your own recording and send it to me for review. If it is good maybe I’ll post it.

  35. Sean says:

    Fr Z Sean: You are perfectly welcome to make your own recording and send it to me for review. If it is good maybe I’ll post it

    I would not be happy recording a mass.

  36. Sean: Then I guess you’re stuck with what I record!

  37. ALL: So far, there are have two $2 donations!  Hurray!  However, with the bite PayPal takes (.36) I net $1.64.   Oh well.   Is that about what a cup of coffee costs these days? 

  38. Andrew says:

    Fr. Z:

    I net $1.64.

    That sounds about right for some recording of Latin. Put on Britney Spears if you wonna see some serious dough. This Latin stuff doesn’t pay.

    PS: If payPal takes that much (nearly half?) why don’t you provide a postal address so we can send a check that will be all yours, no fees withheld.

  39. Sid Cundiff says:

    By an official source I have been told that it is the local tradition as to whether the people or just the server say their parts. I’m sorry if I was off topic

  40. Brian Day says:

    Fr Z,

    Is that $0.36 per transaction, or is it 18%? If it is the latter, then maybe I need to send my donations by snail mail!

  41. Fr. Luke Winkelmann says:

    Fr. Z,
    Thanks very much for this. I have been practicing the Ancient Mass, and needed some verification and confidence building on my Latin. This solves all my problems.

  42. Brian: No… the larger donations don’t get so much taken out. This is above all secure and fast. It works well.

  43. Andrew says:

    Either I’m a total idiot or PayPal does not let you contribute more than the preset $2. I don’t think I’m computer challenged but I am not confortable searching (while some personal information is pending) for some little loophole where the preset $2 amount might be altered. Frustrating!

  44. Henry Edwards says:

    Father Z,
    Andrew is correct. With the Donate button that appears at bottom right of this post, the payer can change neither the quantity nor the unit price. So while set as is, you’ll never get any donation except $2 per transaction.

    One who wants to make a $100 donation, for instance, would have to hit this button and go through the whole personal data entry process 50 times — a good day’s work.

    HOWEVER, with the Make a Donation button that appears under your photo at upper left on this page, the payer can change the unit price, and hence make any size donation he or she wishes.

  45. RBrown says:

    Though I have aways heard correct Roman pronunciation at mass (as opposed to the ‘pronounce it as if it were English’ tendency prevalent elsewhere) I have never heard the very Italian ‘mama mia’ intonation as used in the podcast. In my opinion it would sound like a very strange flourish coming from the mouth of an English priest.
    Comment by Sean

    First, Fr Z is not English, he is American. Anglophone might be the word you’re after. Even so, he is an American Anglophone.

    Second, anyone who is not a native speaker of a Romantic language and has spent some serious time in a Latin milieu in France or Italy (for me, 11 years), has had to come to terms with how to pronounce the R’s and, more importantly, accurately pronouncing the vowels. For example, “IS”–the American tendency is toward an almost indistinguishable pronunciation of “animus” and “animis”.

    Third, there are often regional pronunciations, e.g., in Germany “caelum” is often pronounced “zaelum”.

  46. Everyone: I fixed the donation page and button. It no longer defaults to $2.

  47. Sean says:

    RBrown, I was addressing the case of an English priest. I have never heard an English priest speak with such an accent. Are you telling me that these priests are wrong?

  48. Berolinensis says:

    Sean,

    as Andrew, RBrown and myself have pointed out, there is a legitimate variety of local pronunciations.

    If you prefer the Roman way because you feel it links you more strongly to Rome, this is fine. But it is not a case of right or wrong.

    Father Z,

    both in the introit and in the postcommunio you spell obedivimus/obedire. Is there a reason for this? It should be obœdivimus/obœdire, no?

  49. Berolinensis: First, you are welcome to make your own audio project the way you think it should be done and send it to me. If it passes muster, I might use it or incorporate it in future projects as a "guest" appearance. In the meantime, I will do it my way.

    Second, what is my way? My way is the way Italianate ecclesiastical Latin is pronounced. For example, in the Liber Usualis, a pretty reliable source, there is a pronunciation guide for Latin as spoken and sung. AE and OE are both pronounced as one sound, like E. This would apply to words like caelum and oboedire. There are no umlaut-like sounds of oe in the Roman pronunciation of Church Latin.

    My audio projects are intended to be useful, not definitive. And not an opportunity to impose or pick.

  50. jrny says:

    Fr. Z,

    Speaking of the Liber Usualis pronunciation guide, here is a little detail that is often missed/unknown by many priests (and us laymen alike):

    The words “mihi” and nihil”. In these two words, and their various forms (e.g. nihilum), the “h” is pronounced as a “k” (i.e. mihi = meekee). Evidently, this is derived from eariler spells of these words (e.g. michi, nichil).

    So, my question is 1) Is this “widely” accepted as official Latin pronunciation, and 2? Ifso, how do we get the word out to those ignorant of this fact?

  51. jrny: So, my question is 1) Is this “widely” accepted as official Latin pronunciation, and 2? Ifso, how do we get the word out to those ignorant of this fact?

    1) I think we need some flexibility. 

    2) You make your own version if you think you have a good way of doing it and, if you send it to me and it passes muster, I might use it as a guest spot.

  52. jrny says:

    Fr. Z,

    Thank you. The first part of my question was meant to poll whether or not you wourself use the “h as k” pronunciation and those around you in Rome? I think if the Liber Usualis has made this as part of the official Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation then we should be using it. If not, then why was this tidbit included in the Liber at all? Maybe it sounds better to sing the “h” as a “k” ?

  53. Berolinensis says:

    Fr. Z,

    difficult to tell from writing, but you sound somewhat irritated. I think you misread me. I was not commentating on your pronunciation at all, which I think is very fine, even if I personally rather like (in Germany, that is) the German pronunciation, which is a legitimate option. I was only repeating the point that there are legitimate varieties of pronunciation, which a former commenter seemed not to take into account.

    Regarding the obœdire, I was referring to the spelling in the written propers in the post, where they are written as obedivimus/obedire.

  54. Berolinensis says:

    Fr. Z,

    difficult to tell from writing, but you sound somewhat irritated. Please don’t be. I think you misread me. I was not commentating on your pronunciation at all, which I think is very fine, even if I personally rather like (in Germany, that is) the German pronunciation, which is a legitimate option. I was only repeating the point that there are legitimate varieties of pronunciation, which a former commenter seemed not to take into account.

    Regarding the obœdire, I was referring to the spelling in the written propers in the post, where they are written as obedivimus/obedire.

  55. RBrown says:

    RBrown, I was addressing the case of an English priest. I have never heard an English priest speak with such an accent. Are you telling me that these priests are wrong?
    Comment by Sean

    No, I’m telling you that you are being overly precise with the “correct” pronunciation of Latin. As my Greek teacher in Rome used to say when we asked about a pronunciation, “Until they find the Dead Sea Cassettes, I cannot give you a definitive answer”.

    I think the English tend toward a more distinct pronunciation of vowels than Americans–and so would not be prone to the “animis-animus” sloppiness that is often found in the US. Most Americans in Rome simply cannot apply to Latin their habits of speaking English (see above: animus-animis). And so it is common to start from scratch in pronunciation.

    Having said that, I nevertheless think that if an English priest would have gone through formation with French or Italians, then his Latin pronunciation would reflect that.

    NB: Both Fr Z and I did studies in Rome while living in Italian speaking communities.

  56. RBrown says:

    both in the introit and in the postcommunio you spell obedivimus/obedire. Is there a reason for this? It should be obœdivimus/obœdire, no?
    Comment by Berolinensis/b

    My missal has “obedivimus”, which I think is a common Medieval spelling.

  57. Berolinensis says:

    RBrown, from when is your missal? If looked in my “real” missal from 1937 as well as my six hand missals for the laity from between 1920 and 1961, and they all have “oboedivimus”. Hm, strange. Yes, the “e” is the medieval spelling – they also used to spell “e” instead of “ae” (which can be seen in the word “medieval”, which really should be mediaeval). So, if a consequent medieval spelling were used, the propers should also spell “per omnia secula seculorum”.

  58. RBrown says:

    Saint Andrew Daily Missal*, Gaspar Lefebvre OSB, 1958. \

    Bought it soon after I converted in 1970, and took it with me when we went to Fontgombault in 1972.

    *Abbaye de Saint Andre, Bruges, Belgium

  59. Le Renard says:

    Thank-you, Fr. Z!

    I was actually afraid of this —

    For example, the priest at a parish had just started to celebrate a TLM there (ad experimentum basis though) , but it seemed he was very new at it.

    God bless him for doing so, but the way he pronounced the Latin Prayers sounded fairly elementary and did not have the same flow of pronunciation as a veteran priest who used to say the TLM at another parish until he retired (unfortunately).

    The new priest did not connect his endings well (that is, the flow of his words wasn’t connected — his Latin wasn’t fluid) — as evident with most Latin speakers — even in the restored/Classical Latin version.

    His fragmented pronunciation was especially noticeable when it came to the In principio erat Verbum.

    Again, God bless him though for trying but, hopefully, his Latin will improve eventually and the TLM will continue to be celebrated there.

  60. Fr. Z,

    Would you consider making this project available through a true Podcast so that it can be downloaded to an I-Pod?

  61. Rafael says:

    Father,

    Try using Google Checkout (checkout.google.com) and until december they are not charging a dime of comission for receiving payments. Also it looks like for non-profits (donations) they will keep this “free scheme” longer than december.

  62. Fr. Paul McDonald says:

    Reverend and dear Father moderator: Some guides to ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation say that the letter H is not pronounced. But old priests did pronounce the H in Hoc and Hic in the words of *consecration* (so they tell me). Well, what is the Roman way ?
    Thanks.