EWTN: Sunday Mass in Extraordinary Forum

As I write, EWTN is broadcasting Sunday Mass in the Extraordinary Form.

It is a Missa cantata rather than a Missa solemnis.

Chant accompanied by organ isn’t my preference, but the sisters are singing the Gregorian chant very well.  Perhaps a bit less vibrato is needed from the cantrix.

Notice that the altar is detached from the wall, as GIRM 299 requires.

The celebrant’s Latin reveals very obviously that German is his mother tongue. 

 

 

I am very pleased that there is no voice-over chatter!  But they did put up a  graphic to say which Gospel was being read.

 

 

His sermon is about priests (for Good Shepherd Sunday) and the need to support them.

Apparently tired, Father sits down after the sermon…*

 

 

WHAT?!?  No POTTERY?!  They must not care about the poor!

Father, otherwise a happy fellow, I am sure, is incensed during the offertory.

 

I could use a little less plastic watch.  That is something they can correct in the future.

Notice how the priest keeps his index finger and thumb together even when grasping the chalice.

And, of course, the Second Confiteor…

.. and the absolution…

What this is all about.

Immediately after the Mass there was a brief lesson about where the taberncle should be placed in a church.  Excellent!  High marks from WDTPRS on that!

*I wonder how many people will jump in to inform me what the priest is really doing during the Creed?  

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74 Responses to EWTN: Sunday Mass in Extraordinary Forum

  1. Henry Edwards says:

    It is a Missa cantata rather than a Missa solemnis.

    Splendid. Though the initial solemn Masses on EWTN — the most beautiful I’ve ever seen, either before or after Vatican II — were ideal for the historic and momentous occasion of “the return of the traditional Latin Mass” to the regular liturgy of the Church, it may have been difficult for folks to envision such liturgy coming to their local parish church. Now the huge world-wide Sunday Mass audience is seeing — “simply” and more realistically — the typical parish Sunday sung Mass, Vidi aquam (Asperges) and all, celebrated by possibly believable facsimile of your local pastor, with local altar boys rather than the polished FSSP crew. One brick at a time. Maybe we’ll know the TLM is really “back” when we see on EWTN a quiet daily low Mass celebrated not by a visiting priest but by one of the local friars.

  2. Kradcliffe says:

    Henry, that puts it very well. EWTN had a huge effect on me and many people I know as they converted or returned to the Catholic Church. I hope that such broadcasts become more frequent. (BTW, our little boy is named Henry:) )

  3. Peter says:

    Confiteor Deo …

  4. Njknutson says:

    I am so amazed as well that there are not any voiceovers! I hope EWTN continues on this much more realistic representation of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, whether it is EF or OF. Silence is so important within Mass, our prayer lives, and especially our world! Beautiful!

  5. ben says:

    Father Zulsdorf,

    Sadly, I still have not understood something which you made sure to point out: the Second Confiteor. Can you say definitively whether or not it is omitted or included in the 1962MR? I had understood that it was omitted, as is also indicated in the red hand missals distributed by the PCED.

    Second, I was unable to actually watch the Mass, could you explain what the priest was doing during the Credo?

    Pax tibi,
    ben

  6. ben: You will be able to watch the Mass later in the day during a re-broadcast.

    The PCED does not distribute hand missals. Only the PCED can give definitive answers to questions about the older form of Mass.

    Very often priests sit down while the Gloria or Credo are being completed by the choir or schola cantorum.

  7. Henry Edwards says:

    I am so amazed as well that there are not any voiceovers!

    EWTN telecasts Mass daily and Sunday from Irondale or Hanceville, 365 days a year. There never, ever is any voice over in these EWTN originated telecasts. These irritations appear only in Vatican Radio feeds from Rome (or elsewhere).

    Incidentally, the following two \”encore telecasts\” of this morning\’s Missa Cantata are scheduled on EWTN:

    5 pm Sunday, April 6 and 12 am (midnight) Monday, April 7
    (U.S. EDT)

  8. Henry: Splendid. One brick at a time. Maybe we’ll know the TLM is really “back” when we see on EWTN a quiet daily low Mass celebrated not by a visiting priest but by one of the local friars.

    Amen!  Moreover, I have always pressed that ordinary diocesan priests should be the very first choice when it comes to working in parishes.  This is no way is meant to lessen the impact the FSSP has had.  However, when diocesan priests get on board in larger numbers and when they become the first choice of bishops for, say, personal parishes, then the real work will pick up speed.

  9. JML says:

    I personally like the 2nd Confetior. However, my question, is what is the purpose of the 2nd (tiny) chalice? It was not shown, but I think it may have been given to Mother Superior?

    Our Missa Cantata takes about 1:15, this one took 1:45. The sermon was a bit longer and there were more people @ communion (sigh!), so maybe the time was OK. I will take the sermon to heart and offer a daily devotion to those in religous life.

    Was nice to see PRIESTS distribute communion. Was one of the priests FSSP? He looked familiar — didn’t he deliver the sermon at the 14 September EF Mass on EWTN?

  10. Legisperitus says:

    Was there any advance announcement that EWTN’s Sunday Mass was going to be extraordinary form? If not, then great! That’s what freedom within the treasury of the Church’s liturgy is all about, it seems to me. You needn’t make a big ado about the fact that you’re doing it… just do it.

  11. Michael says:

    The 1961 Liber says:

    “Whenever holy Communion is given during Mass, the celebrant,
    having consumed the Precious Blood, and with no Confiteor
    said, omitting the absolution, immediately says Ecce Agnus
    Dei and three times Domine, non sum dignus. He then distributes
    holy Communion.”

    It would seem that it’s been removed. But the Holy See has , to my knowledge, never once comdemned it, and it’s become an almost universal “custom.” It should have never been removed, and I’m glad the Holy See is showing due toleration in this regard. The more I learn about the liturgical movement, the more I’m convinced it’s the source of our current woes. They were the one’s who really pressed for a simplified liturgy where every gesture and word could be rationally explained. And when this is your ideal, you reach a point where its just easier to write your own liturgy than try and turn the old one into what you want. They had no tolerance for repetition or custom, no matter how traditional. They all thought they could improve on tradition, even on the rubrics and texts. Their insistence on free standing altars is a perfect example. They hadn’t been the norm for almost a thousand years, and yet they wanted them to be universal because of one rubric in the Missal that hadn’t been taken literally since the Middle Ages. They got their wish.

  12. magdalen says:

    I was able to see just a portion of the Holy Sacrifice on EWTN before I left
    for Mass. But Mass today made me wish to cry. Oh, terrible songs! We congratulated
    ourselves in our round church with a new song about how we are God’s work
    of art. Then we ‘sang to the mountains’ and my most disliked song came up–
    “WE come to share our story, WE come to break the bread, WE come to know our
    rising from the dead” It seems most of our songs start with the word ‘we’. But
    I did not ‘share my story’ nor did I break any bread nor have I yet risen from
    the dead. In his homily father explained about the open table. Yes, the open
    tomb, the open scriptures and the open table. No mention of the Eucharist of course,
    there never ever is. Father just asked what is it in ourselves that keeps us from
    being open. Our Lord basically is never mentioned for it is all a gathering
    of the assmebly. I wanted to cry. Then at the end of Mass, father was ‘arrested’
    by a group raising money and told to take off his vestments and put on a
    striped inmate shirt. Lots of laughing and clapping–so Mass was just a big
    joke. And I wanted to run out of there and, in fact, at that point I left.

    Outwardly there is no similarity to the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass that was
    televised on EWTN today and the ‘gathering of the assembly’ that I experienced
    and that millions experienced today. We are busy about our self-affirmation and
    the worship of God is not something thought about much. It is like two
    different worlds.

    YES, I do know that Our Lord is present in our gathering and in our Mass
    that no one here would call a sacrifice–other than our time and money
    of course–and I have endured but I am near the end of my endurance. I must
    find a place to worship God as He deserves. One friend went to the Greek Orthodox and
    others have gone into schism. I do not see those as possibilities for me. I
    hope to move, to leave my hometown and find another place where Our Lord is
    loved, revered, and worshiped. There are still such places, are there not?

  13. Dan O says:

    Fr. Z writes, “Father, otherwise a happy fellow, I am sure, is incensed during the offertory.”
    Great joke, Father. Some of us liberals, contrary to your opinion in other posts, do have a sense of humor.

    JML writes, “there were more people @ communion (sigh!)”
    I’m not sure if you are being sarcastic here or truly wish that fewer people were receiving communion. Maybe my ability to sense humor is not as good as I think it is. This is one area where the gravitational pull of the NO is pulling the EF and that is the way it should be, in my opinion.

  14. Thomas says:

    It was nice of Jesus to come and serve as “leader of song” for the Mass.

  15. Michael says:

    Dan O,

    Though it might be nice that everyone received communion, what percentage of the people who come to comfession on Christmans and Easter in the US do you think are in a state of grace. There’s no way to kow for sure, but I wouldn’t say it’s that high. People in their second marriage with only one kid who haven’t been to confession in ten years are most likely not properly disposed. It’s a painful sight to watch 400 biannual chuch goers who lead scandalous lives casually receive our lord in the palm of their hand and pop Him into their mouth like a Cheeto. And none of them would think of staying in the pews and praying because for their whole lives they’ve been taught that the point of Mass in communion. If you don’t receive, it’s like you haven’t gone.

    I visited the Brompton Oratory last year and heard a wonderful sermon on how we need to be properly disposed when we receive communion and what it means to be in a state of grace. I was shocked at how few people actually approached the altar rail once this was explained to them.

  16. MM says:

    Are those enclosed nuns Dominican?

    Where was this Mass said, anyway? It looks beautiful.

    Thanks for sharing this with us, Father!

  17. Beautiful, I can’t wait to serve at the EF Mass today. :)

  18. GJP says:

    The nuns are Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration. They are Mother Angelica’s sisters belonging to the Shine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, AL – where this Mass was taking place.

    http://www.olamshrine.com

  19. Theodore says:

    What a pleasure it is to see Fr. Wolfgang Seitz, Order of the Holy Cross, celebrating Holy Mass at EWTN. That is (Bavarian) Latin you hear.

    Fr. Wolfgang has graciously celebrated our indult Mass at All Saints in Flint, MI many times.

  20. TJM says:

    Dear Father Z,

    I liked your comment about the vibrato. As a Church soloist, choir member, and cantor over the last 40 years, vibrato is something a singer oftentimes slips into without even realize they are doing it. It takes a little doing, but with concentration, the vibrato can be turned off. By the way, I’ve noticed recently that the EWTN Novus Ordo altar arrangement is now “a la Benedictine.” It looks extremely nice.

    Tom

  21. I got to watch about one half hour of the Mass. The re-broadcast is at midnight, which i will watch. Truly it is a beautiful Mass even when celebrated in the Low Mass form. FRANKLY IT IS ONLY Televisivo Vaticano which employs some of the most tiresome commentators who frankly don’t have a clue as to what is going on. Once in a while EWTN has a problem with the Spanish translator over riding the English, but that gets resolved rather quickly.

  22. rpg3 says:

    JML

    In answer to your question, you are correct, that is Father Calvin Goodwin FSSP, he gave the sermon on the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, a really good preacher in my opinion.

  23. jacobus says:

    “Father, otherwise a happy fellow, I am sure, is incensed during the offertory.”
    Ah, Father, one of my favorite jokes!

    This church is a great example of an absolutely beautiful altar separate from the wall.

  24. The extra chalice was for the few nuns who cannot receive the hosts because of an allergy to wheat.

  25. Fr. McAfee: I saw him prepare an extra chalice and I see one in the screen capture I posted with a pall, but I didn’t opine about it.

  26. Fr. Wade says:

    I met Fr. Goodwin at the FSSP training workshop for the EF in November. A good priest! Anyone know where the Vestment is from?

  27. Diane says:

    Ben: “What a pleasure it is to see Fr. Wolfgang Seitz, Order of the Holy Cross, celebrating Holy Mass at EWTN. That is (Bavarian) Latin you hear.

    Fr. Wolfgang has graciously celebrated our indult Mass at All Saints in Flint, MI many times.”

    Fr. Wolfgang is primarily at Assumption Grotto in Detroit where he celebrates the Latin Novus Ordo, the vernacular ordinary form, and the extraordinary form in a rotation with my pastor and his associates.

    He also celebrates at St. Josaphat in Detroit and was one of the priests celebrating regularly there during the Indult days.

    He is a member of the ORC not the OSC – both called Canons Regular of the Holy Cross.

    His sermon was powerful. I’d like to hear more thoughts on what others thought about it. He is always a profound speaker, offering Days of Recollection with his brother priests who are also in Detroit. They live not far from Assumption Grotto, while the sisters associated with the order live on the grounds of Assumption Grotto in an old convent once used by Dominicans.

    I’m hoping the audio will be podcasted.

  28. Gregor says:

    “Notice that the altar is detached from the wall, as GIRM 299 requires.”

    “Quod expetit ubicumque possibile sit” is not really a requiremnt, but rather a recommendation, as the CDW has clarified.

  29. Eric says:

    Why is the altar required to be detached? It seems in older more traditional churches the altars are never detached and are against the wall or with a reredos behind them which seems much more attractive and beautiful. Just something I didn’t understand.

    Also, I saw the explanation of what the priest was doing when he sat down, but why is that? I have been to Masses with different priests and have seen them sit while the prayers are still being sung, but I have also seen priests remain standing at the altar, even if they are not perfectly in sync with the choir. Is this just personal style or is there some reasoning behind it? Personally, I always thought it was nicer when the priest remains at the altar. If there is some reason I am ignorant of or not understanding, then I apologize (this is certainly not meant as as criticism), but quite often I see the priest go to sit down and the congregation is left confused, half standing, half sitting. Just wondering…

  30. Patrick says:

    All praise The Eternal God for his gift of the mass. Yes I say gift. Too many people now see it as something they are owed! The mass in all its splendor is Christ’s Gift of himself to us.

    You know, a year ago, when the Mass was finally brought back, I was stubbourn about it. After all, a core of Vatican II was to go out into the world. However, a couple months ago, my eyes were finally open. I wasnt going to mass weekly. I have been going to a concert. Some masses I felt the need to even shower after.. and no one should ever ever ever feel that after being in the presence of God, Present in the Most Holy Eucharist.

    The latin mass, in its form, of a priest leading us in prayer, I think rightly reminds us of the humility that we need to feel in the presence of God, for he is truly present in the Eucharist, whether its a Novus ordo mass, or the Extraordinary form.

    Today, I went to a Extraordinary form mass for the first time, went to an oratory at a local abbey/prep school. I have never felt more at home. I knew none of the people, I shook no hands, I didnt have coffee and donuts. But the mass, in its form, being in latin, and all of us, focused in prayer (which that form of the mass does EXTREMELY well) made me feel more united with my church, that I have grown up in then I have ever felt. Probably the only thing that was more was my wedding day, when I and my wife gave ourselves to each other before Christ and the church sacramentally. I probably stumbled on the latin, even though I am a church musician, and I am sure I said one or two things out of place (responding at the wrong time). But to experience the church, in all its regality and splendor, to experience the faith being taught and defended, rather then being tolerated (this priest was bold enough to teach honest to goodness catechism), and to see the Eucharist, being given its proper prominence and respect, made my heart overwhelm with a joy I have never felt. I was truly home, even though I am a “cradle catholic”. The mass had purpose. Everything had its place, just as all things have a time, a purpose a season under heaven.

    We should all pray for those who support this beautiful witness of our church. Those who are in doubt , I would challenge you with this question. We are Catholic, why do we call ourselves catholic? All things that are claimed to be different or better, need to have a concrete manifestation of why they are different or better. Any one can read scripture, sing songs, put on a show. The Mass , is something more. The mass is what people identify as being catholic, those that are on the outside. It is fitting and proper, that it should be truly unique. So many “interpretations” of the novus ordo, almost seem to make us protestant (and I mean no disrespect to our brothers in faith). But I make the comment, to point out that in an attempt to make everyone happy, we have in many cases as a people sold our selves out! So many people have no clue about how the mass is even properly celebrated. I am 28. I rang bells as a server. Someone 20 years my senior who I was talking to made the comment “They STILL rang bells ? That was supposed to go away with Vatican II” ..I polited took the time to educate my friend that many of the things we think went away, actually never went any where. This is what we are dealing with. How wonderful it is to claim a heritage of latin, of the beautiful rites that were (and should be ) still celebrated. Mass is something purely for God, and as such should have the utmost reverence associated with it.

    I think in many ways, God allowed this to happen, the past 40+ years. Look at all the atrocities that came in to existence before, during and after the council. 3 Wars, legalized abortion, schisms within the Catholic church itself. The world, and the cchurch itself, needed to be cleansed in many ways. I really think the metal is being tested, and forged into something more wondrous then before. As I explained to my wife today, in my meager attempt at be a teacher in my house, its almost like we have been in the desert literally for 40 years, and that God has a much bigger plan then any of us could ever understand. I think after all is said and done, when the new missle comes out, people will feel what I did today. In relationships, they say apartness makes the heart grow fonder. One could easily reason that the Extraordinary form, coming back now (well coming back into being s standard and not hidden in the closet), in many ways, is our hearts, well atleast mine, being made fonder of the Holy Church, and all the gifts of the Trinity that we have in it. I think God allowed us to feel the pain of being separated from it, so that we could truly learn as a Church, what it means to be with it.

    God Bless His Holiness Benedict XVI and the Bishops who have worked to bring what vatican II truly intended, to light for people.

    Tu Christe Rex Gloria!

  31. Patrick says:

    All praise The Eternal God for his gift of the mass. Yes I say gift. Too many people now see it as something they are owed! The mass in all its splendor is Christ’s Gift of himself to us.

    You know, a year ago, when the Mass was finally brought back, I was stubbourn about it. After all, a core of Vatican II was to go out into the world. However, a couple months ago, my eyes were finally open. I wasnt going to mass weekly instead I have been going to a concert. Some masses I felt the need to even shower after.. and no one should ever ever ever feel that after being in the presence of God, Present in the Most Holy Eucharist.

    The latin mass, in its form, of a priest leading us in prayer, I think rightly reminds us of the humility that we need to feel in the presence of God, for he is truly present in the Eucharist, whether its a Novus ordo mass, or the Extraordinary form.

    Today, I went to a Extraordinary form mass for the first time, went to an oratory at a local abbey/prep school. I have never felt more at home. I knew none of the people, I shook no hands, I didnt have coffee and donuts. But the mass, in its form, being in latin, and all of us, focused in prayer (which that form of the mass does EXTREMELY well) made me feel more united with my church, that I have grown up in then I have ever felt. Probably the only thing that was more was my wedding day, when I and my wife gave ourselves to each other before Christ and the church sacramentally. I probably stumbled on the latin, even though I am a church musician, and I am sure I said one or two things out of place (responding at the wrong time). But to experience the church, in all its regality and splendor, to experience the faith being taught and defended, rather then being tolerated (this priest was bold enough to teach honest to goodness catechism), and to see the Eucharist, being given its proper prominence and respect, made my heart overwhelm with a joy I have never felt. I was truly home, even though I am a “cradle catholic”. The mass had purpose. Everything had its place, just as all things have a time, a purpose a season under heaven.

    We should all pray for those who support this beautiful witness of our church. Those who are in doubt , I would challenge you with this question. We are Catholic, why do we call ourselves catholic? All things that are claimed to be different or better, need to have a concrete manifestation of why they are different or better. Any one can read scripture, sing songs, put on a show. The Mass , is something more. The mass is what people identify as being catholic, those that are on the outside. It is fitting and proper, that it should be truly unique. So many “interpretations” of the novus ordo, almost seem to make us protestant (and I mean no disrespect to our brothers in faith). But I make the comment, to point out that in an attempt to make everyone happy, we have in many cases as a people sold our selves out! So many people have no clue about how the mass is even properly celebrated. I am 28. I rang bells as a server. Someone 20 years my senior who I was talking to made the comment “They STILL rang bells ? That was supposed to go away with Vatican II” ..I polited took the time to educate my friend that many of the things we think went away, actually never went any where. This is what we are dealing with. How wonderful it is to claim a heritage of latin, of the beautiful rites that were (and should be ) still celebrated. Mass is something purely for God, and as such should have the utmost reverence associated with it.

    I think in many ways, God allowed this to happen, the past 40+ years. Look at all the atrocities that came in to existence before, during and after the council. 3 Wars, legalized abortion, schisms within the Catholic church itself. The world, and the cchurch itself, needed to be cleansed in many ways. I really think the metal is being tested, and forged into something more wondrous then before. As I explained to my wife today, in my meager attempt at be a teacher in my house, its almost like we have been in the desert literally for 40 years, and that God has a much bigger plan then any of us could ever understand. I think after all is said and done, when the new missle comes out, people will feel what I did today. In relationships, they say apartness makes the heart grow fonder. One could easily reason that the Extraordinary form, coming back now (well coming back into being s standard and not hidden in the closet), in many ways, is our hearts, well atleast mine, being made fonder of the Holy Church, and all the gifts of the Trinity that we have in it. I think God allowed us to feel the pain of being separated from it, so that we could truly learn as a Church, what it means to be with it.

    God Bless His Holiness Benedict XVI and the Bishops who have worked to bring what vatican II truly intended, to light for people.

    Tu Christe Rex Gloria!

  32. Gregor: In new construction it is indeed possible.

  33. Father M says:

    Yes, Father, yes…DIOCESAN priests are what will make the Benedictine reforms take hold. Those of us who do offer the older Mass, and who have found our priesthood anchored there, nevertheless recognize that we have a tremendous debt to the FSSP and others (St. John Cantius, ICK, and even, yes, the SSPX). They will have a tremendous role in the years to come, possibly a role few of the original FSSP fathers foresaw in 1988 or 1998. But traditional, apostolic liturgy (EF or OF) must be mainstreamed. This will be hard, because most of us who are diocesan priests have limited resources (people who can chant, proper vessels and vestments, etc.), and are leery of the reactions of fellow priests and their bishops. That being said, it is happening, even in outlying areas (I have a parish in an isolated town of 7000 souls and winter can make travel difficult). EWTN, however, is seen in my parish and elsewhere. Something beautiful is afoot.

  34. Gregor says:

    Fr Zuhlsdorf:

    Of course it is possible. But the IGMR just says “expedit”, i.e. “it is expdient”. It does not constitute an obligation, and the CDW has expressly said so, in a responsum ad dubium, IIRC.

  35. mbd says:

    Michael, re: your comment laying most of the blame for the liturgical misdirection of the past few decades at the foot of the liturgical movement, you might find Fr. Aiden Nichol’s book, Looking At The Liturgy, of interest. It is, as I recall, a somewhat more nuanced evaluation along those lines.

  36. †JMJ† says:

    The extra chalice was for the few nuns who cannot receive the hosts because of an allergy to wheat.

    Comment by fr.franklyn mcafee — 6 April 2008 @ 12:57 pm

    Your Reverence,

    Are they only consecrating unleavened bread? Or are they putting something else in the second chalice?

  37. Diane says:

    Eric: Also, I saw the explanation of what the priest was doing when he sat down, but why is that?

    Father Z can correct me if I am wrong, but by the time the priest has sat down, he has already fully prayed the Credo verbally while it was being sung. The priest may sit more commonly when the Credo, or even the Gloria, is really long. This happens frequently at Assumption Grotto where Fr. Wolfgang celebrates periodically because there is much sacred polyphony with some of the great masterpieces. Sometimes it would be impractical for a priest to stand during the entire Gloria.

    I have observed the typical gestures we would expect to see in the Gloria (head bows at the name of Jesus Christ) before the priest goes to sit down so I have always assumed that he has fully prayed it before he takes his seat. He may sing along with the rest of it afterwards because….he so desires.

    Fr. Z – can you clarify? Is this a correct observation. I’v not had a chance to ask Fr. Perrone or others celebrating.

  38. JML says:

    DanO

    My sigh was that I wish we had more people at our EF Mass in MD. We’re growing, but as Fr. Z says, one parishoner at a time….

  39. Gregor: I know you enjoy sniping. If memory serves there is a document out there that speaks of the position of the altar when there is new construction. Someone else can look for it.

  40. Diane: Yes, by the time the priest sits, he has said the Gloria or the Creed on his own. Then he sits and waits, essentially, for the choir to catch up. This is because at the next “stage” of the Mass, there is a Dominus vobiscum followed by a sung reply Et cum spiritu tuo.  

  41. Beautiful Mass! I hope it’ll be on later today so I can watch it. Thanks for the wonderful post and the awesome pics, as well as the jokes and the little Jesus figure!

  42. Dave DeCleene says:

    How heavenly! Two of the servers (brothers) pictured are my close friends, and this week we had an Institute of Christ the King priest here for probably the first sanctioned Traditional Latin (Extraordinary Form) Mass on the Big Island in 40 years. These are times of hope.

  43. Joseph says:

    Does anyone know the name of the priest who offered the Requiem Mass at the Shrine on April 2nd? I was there but I never caught his name…he was amazing though!

  44. GOR says:

    “…less of the plastic watch…”

    A small point, but in the “old days” it was advised that priests remove their watches before celebrating Mass.

  45. Diane says:

    I understand it will be rebroadcast at 11:00pm EST. I’m wondering if this isn’t truly central time which would be midnight EST.

    Thanks Father Z – for confirming what I thought I was observing with the Gloria and the Credo.

    I have also noticed that during the sermons, the priests will remove their biretta when the one delivering a sermon mentions the name of Jesus. I would imagine that priests have a pact amongst themselves to limit the number of times this sacred name is said and they have an idea when to expect it. Regardless, it is so very dignified to see.

  46. David2 says:

    JMJ, Latin-Rite Priests always use unleavened bread:

    Can. 926 According to the ancient tradition of the Latin Church, the priest is to use unleavened bread in the eucharistic celebration whenever he offers it

    The problem with those who have a wheat allergy is not leaven (yeast) but wheat itself (specifically gleutin therein).

    Canon 924 says:

    §2. The bread must be only wheat and recently made so that there is no danger of spoiling.

    Now, there has been a debate about so-called gleutin-free hosts, and whether they contravene Can 924. I have heard traditionalist priests say that it is better to apply Can 925, which says:

    Can. 925 Holy communion is to be given under the form of bread alone, or under both species according to the norm of the liturgical laws, or even under the form of wine alone in a case of necessity.

    The opinion of many Canonists is that a severe allergy to wheat constitutes a “necessity” such as to entitle the religious or lay faithful to receive under the form of wine alone – and that this is liturgically preferable to the practice of “gleutin-free hosts”, which have been crticicized by the holy see: see for example http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/08/19/1092889278988.html. The canons seem clear to me – in cases of “necessity” – receiving the Eucharist under the form of Precious blood alone is preferable to a non-wheaten host. That’s just my half-educated opinion, however. Take it or leave it.

  47. Dan O says:

    Diane writes, “I would imagine that priests have a pact amongst themselves to limit the number of times this sacred name…”

    I have read that the priest tips his biretta the first three times the name Jesus is said and on the fourth time simply removes his biretta for the rest of the sermon.

    Can anyone confirm or refute this?

  48. Terth says:

    Gregor – no sniping, now; but have you found the document Fr. Z. referenced? I looked up GIRM 299, and I’m interested.

    Fr. Z. – thank you so much for the screen shots of this Holy Mass broadcast on EWTN. Maybe when Congress further inserts itself into our lives by eliminating analog TV next February I’ll subscribe to cable…though unlikely.

  49. David2 says:

    Diane and Dan O, my local Diocesan TLM-saying priest doesn’t wear the biretta for the sermon at all, only for his processional and recessional. Mum thinks that he just hates wearing hats. Oh BTW, he won’t wear the biretta at a Low Mass. The FSSP chaplains in Sydney rarely wear the biretta, but some wear an alb with a hood. One OP who used to say the Mass in my state used a a hood (presumably on his habit); I assumed this was a Dominican practice, until I saw the FSSP do it.

    So go figure (as you Americans say) ;)

  50. Michael says:

    Re: the placement of the tabernacle

    According to the 1917 Code of Canon Law, the tabernacle in churches where the Divine Office is sung (ie. Mother Angelica’s Shrine, if the nuns sing their regular office there) is never supposed to be on the High Altar but on a seperate altar out of reverence for the Sacrament. This was he rule in the days when tabernacles were always on altars and never on pillars or a niche in the wall. Placing the tabernacle behind the altar in the sanctuary would seem to defeat the purpose of not having it on the the High Altar, so it would actually be very traditional to place the tabernacle off to the side in such a church.

  51. Jack007 says:

    Terth:
    Funny thing, I’m seriously considering finally writing off TV completely when the switch to digital comes. I have never had cable.
    BUT— I watch EWTN on the Internet. If you have a broadband connection you don’t need cable! Try it!
    Jack in KC

  52. †JMJ† says:

    David2 – I should have phrased my post differently. I actually was stating your first part. But thank you for the rest and the specific canon references as well.

  53. RP says:

    The priest may sit during the singing of the kyrie, gloria, and credo. He typically never sits for the kyrie, except in the cases of long polyphonic settings. The celebrant first says the gloria inaudibly, as well as the credo, and having completed them sits down.
    If it is a very short setting and he is older, he may wish to stay at the altar rather than go back to the sedilia.

  54. dcs says:

    Are there any rules against priests wearing wristwatches etc. while celebrating Mass? I personally find it pretty distracting, especially during the elevation as in the picture Fr. Z. shows here.

  55. According to clarifications issued by the Pontifical Commission “Ecclesia Dei”:

    1. The second Confiteor is omitted
    2. In a Missa Cantata the celebrant may pray the kyrie, gloria and credo with the choir/people so it is not necessary for him to recite them inaudibly first.

  56. Mike Morrow says:

    Joseph asked: Does anyone know the name of the priest who offered the Requiem Mass at the Shrine on April 2nd?

    The celebrant at Wednesday’s Solemn High Requiem Mass for John Paul II was Fr. James Fryar, FSSP, of the Diocese of Venice, FL. The excellent MC of that Mass also was MC at the truely exceptional September 14 Mass from OLAM Shrine, but I don’t know his name.

    The four TLMs that I’ve seen at OLAM Shrine are the most beautiful Masses I’ve ever seen, even before Vatcan II. I am disappointed that last week’s Requiem was not recorded and broadcast by EWTN.

    The September 14 Mass was perfection from start to finish, simply breathtaking and stunning. I only question the use for the exit hymn of the Anglican “Lift High the Cross” which, AFAIK, was never sung at pre-Vatican II Catholic services. Perhaps it was intended as a symbolic tie to the novus ordo.

    Today’s Mass was also impressive, and doubtless will soon be available on DVD. I too think that Fr. Seitz’s watch should have been in his pocket, but that’s a nit pick. I was surprised to see Fr. Calvin Goodwin present to deliver communion. He did likewise at Wednesday’s Requiem.

  57. T. Chan says:

    Does anyone know which Regina Coeli the nuns were singing at the end?

  58. Gregor says:

    Dear Father,

    I am not sure why you accuse me of sniping? I was merely pointing out that there is actually no obligation, but only a recommendation to build the altar detached from the wall (“a pariete sejunctum”). I have found the document: It is then responsum ad dubium Prot. 2036/00/L. This is the relevant part of what the the CDW says:

    “Before all else, it is to be borne in mind that the word expedit does not constitute an obligation, but a suggestion that refers to the construction of the altar a pariete sejunctum.”

  59. Volpius says:

    I have now has the chance to watch this Mass, outstanding is the best word I can think of to describe it, the sermon was a breath of fresh air to compared to what I’m used to locally.

  60. AlexB says:

    Fr. Wade:

    Fr. Wolfgang borrowed that vestment set from Detroit’s St. Josaphat Church. This set, like most of the other Roman sets at the parish, was custom made to pastor Fr. Mark Borkowski’s specifications by The Vestry, a vestment manufacturer from Ontario, Canada.

  61. Gregor: As I said before, if my memory serves, there is a statement out there somewhere about the altar when there is new construction (or significant reconstruction). I don’t have time to look for it right now. I am sure you can.

  62. Sharon Boyle says:

    Thank you for all the comments. I am a Catholic enquirer, sort of new to all of
    this. Even though I am new, I am enjoying it immensley! I am learning so much.
    I am married to a Catholic, who has taught me so much, also. I have been attending
    RCIA at St. Dominic’s in Kingsport, TN, and I Love it! I found the Catholic Digest
    there and will be subscribing to it very soon. I enjoy reading this website also.
    Again, Thank you so much!

    Sharon Boyle
    Kingsport, TN

  63. Bruce Barker says:

    In answer to the host question, low-gluten wheat hosts may validly be used for Holy Communion. The presence of some gluten preserves the character of wheat bread, while the absence of most of the gluten makes it tolerable to many people with celiac disease. If they cannot receive even these hosts, then they can have recourse to Communion from the Chalice.

    http://origin.ewtn.com/library/CURIA/CDFMUSTM.HTM

  64. vmc says:

    I saw the Mass on the encore performance at midnight. I think it was the most beautiful Mass that I have ever seen. The monastery is breathtaking. Fr. Wolfgang’s homily was humble, and spiritually encouraging. He sounded like angel. The sister’s chant was beautiful. It was like heaven! I hope EWTN makes the video available.

  65. Ken says:

    That sanctuary gives new meaning to the Prayers at the FOOT of the Altar. The poor priest and altar boys barely had twelve inches between the rail and the steps!

  66. Pope says:

    “Are there any rules against priests wearing wristwatches etc. while celebrating Mass? I personally find it pretty distracting, especially during the elevation as in the picture Fr. Z. shows here.

    Comment by dcs — 6 April 2008 @ 9:41 pm ”

    Anybody know an answer to this. . . I’ve been wondering about it for a while
    myself??

    Thanks!

  67. Lee says:

    Saw the encore @ midnight. Beauitful!! I have only attended one TLM here in West Virginia. No comparison, although the one here was nicely done. Was able to follow along with ’62 Missal & hope EWTN makes this available on DVD soon. The music is “otherworldly” and being new to this form, really draws you into a mode of prayer.

  68. Michael C. says:

    Ken,

    This is the unfortunate consequence of bringing the altar forward to be closer to the people. Sure, they can see everything, but it means the sacred ministers have to be spilling out into the sactuary. Almost all new Churches in traditional styles are being designed like this. The Our Lady of Guadalupe by Duncan Stroik does the same thing. The only exception I’ve come across is Thomas Gordon Smith’s Clear Creek Monastery church, which leaves plenty of room for as many ministers as the liturgical books require. There’s something very sacred about being distanced from the sacred actions on the altar. Dr. Leander Harding published this on his blog a while back:

    “The typical Gothic set up of so many of our buildings with a large Nave of pews and an high altar seperated by a Sanctuary with a choir from the Nave has as its Biblical point of reference the Book of Hebrews. The floor plan of the deep Sanctuary seperated from the Nave, sometimes with a rood screen, speaks of the transcendance and awesomeness of God and of the gulf that seperates us who are not holy from all holiness and of the gulf that seperates the creature from the creator.”

    I think this is very true, and it’s a concept that the average person never has to put into words to appreciate. There’s something very moving about watching a priest pray silently at the Canon off in the distance. We look at the host at the elevation like a distant star, and then the priest comes to us laymen in the nave bearing the body of Christ Himself. That same host that was unreachable only a few moments ago is in front of us, there to consume.

  69. RBrown says:

    Are there any rules against priests wearing wristwatches etc. while celebrating Mass? I personally find it pretty distracting, especially during the elevation as in the picture Fr. Z. shows here.
    Comment by dcs

    I am stunned by such a reaction. I could understand it if the celebrant had on an unusual watch like a Rolex, but wristwatches are commonly worn. Do you usually check out someone’s watch?

  70. Maureen says:

    Speaking as someone who watched the EWTN Mass under the influence of medication, I thought the choir/schola was very soothing, though not as soothing as the homily.

    I woke up after Mass was over. :)

  71. SMP & JM says:

    I am very grateful for Fr. Z’s posting of these photos.

    We watched the Mass live on Sunday and it was truly beautifully celebrated and inspiring.

    I am only surprised that most of the comments focused on the exterior. The Mass was not just celebrated by a priest going through the motions and following rules and regulations… he truly seemed to be there before God offering the Sacrifice. The wrist watch was really beside the point, although better without.

    This was evident by the powerful and profound sermon on the preisthood and the need of praying for our priests. This phrase particularly struck me: “If your knees are not bent in prayer for us… we will fall.” It wasn’t just the words Father pronounced… he spoke from the heart. We really need to take these words (& the rest of his sermon) to heart as we hear of so many priests who have fallen away. Our responsibility is to support them with our prayers, and yes, sacrifices. How important this is!

    We do not only need the EF we need HOLY PRIESTS celebrating the Mass in its Extraordinary and Ordinary Forms.

  72. Diane says:

    Amen to the comment from SMP & JM. I have been rather surprised by the total lack of discussion surrounding that most powerful sermon.

    If you notice one thing about the EF it’s how deeply in prayer the priests are before Mass even begins. It is carried out throughout. People are no longer the focus as they are in some parishes celebrating the OF (our parish celebrates all Masses – EF and OF, with priests deeply in prayer, not greeting people as they go up the aisle). It sets the mood and clearly leads us to an understanding that the Mass is not about us, but about giving God due worship simply for His sake, not ours.

    I am hoping the podcast of the sermon will be available soon and will be discussed on the blogosphere.

    Incidentally, I have emailed EWTN and asked that they make the DVD available. If you are interested in purchasing a DVD of that Mass, please email them at viewer@ewtn.com and let them know.

  73. Val says:

    The podcast is available at the EWTN pod archives. I hope many people will really listen to what he is saying, it is so very important!