A good use for OCP products

From a priest reader… finally a good use for something sent out by OCP.

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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25 Responses to A good use for OCP products

  1. Iosephus says:

    Yes, but I hope that the box was sprinkled with holy water first!

  2. Jeff Pinyan says:

    Yeah, isn’t that profaning the altar? ;)

  3. David Andrew says:

    It’s also best, for many reasons, to just leave all the copies of “Bustin’ Bread” in the box when using the box for this purpose.

    Other non-liturgical uses for a full box of “Bustin’ Bread” from OCP include weighing down the back of your car for extra traction in the winter, taking the curl out of newly-purchased posters, and (for Fr. Z.) as weights for pressing large batches of foi gras.

  4. Andy says:

    I like to use my OCP boxes as kindling for firing up the stake.

  5. pelerin says:

    Not being American, can anyone enlighten me as to what OCP is please?

  6. Brian says:

    Too funny!

  7. Charivari Rob says:

    Pelerin – “Not being American, can anyone enlighten me as to what OCP is please?”

    Based on the carton shown in the photo, I think it’s a reference to Oregon Catholic Press, a large publisher of (among other things) the softcover seasonal missalettes and hymnals.

  8. Byzshawn says:

    Ah, yes. OCP I am a retired organist and choirmaster (notice that I didn’t say “Pastoral Musician”). I retired from service to the Church precisely because I was tired of being OCP’d on.

  9. Johnny Domer says:

    That is the most awesome thing ever!!!!!

  10. pelerin says:

    Thanks to the replies to my query. Having had a look at the site (all smiley faces) I am now enlightened! I notice that all hymns are referred to as songs, a change which has crept into usage in Britain in the modern liturgy too. Perhaps it is thought that people today are incapable of knowing what a ‘hymn’ is?

  11. MPod says:

    I’ve sometimes used the word “song” because so much of what we are asked to sing at Holy Mass isn’t worthy of the venerable title of hymn. But it’s still (minimally) music, and so I’ve got to call it something. Of course, what I would REALLY like to call it is…

  12. David Andrew says:

    I retired from service to the Church precisely because I was tired of being OCP’d on.

    Outstanding.

  13. Matt Q says:

    LOL. I think that’s funny. Heh-heh, when you don’t have tabernacle to lean it against, you use what you have at the moment. See, and all the anti-Tradition naysayers say we take ourselves too seriously. Then again, the first couple comments… 0_o

  14. Fr. Tony says:

    Just a couple days ago, I used one of their publications to swat a fly. OCP’s products are deadly in more than one way.

  15. Maureen says:

    Re: “song” vs. “hymn” —

    In my case, our music director worries about the usage of “hymn” in its extended sense as “religious song praising God”.

    “Song of praise” (of anyone or anything was indeed the original meaning, and was a statement of poetic genre. However, in music, apparently the technical sense is something to do with whether it has a refrain or not.

    I can’t be bothered to worry about whether a song has a refrain or not, because it’s a silly sort of distinction anyway and is called something entirely different in the technical jargon of poetry. (Which is of course much superior.) But I don’t like to distress our music director, so I try to do as directed and just say song, to avoid making any mistake.

    Probably some idiot had a workshop pointing out this “fact”, and the rest of us are to be chivied into it or coerced into saying “song” in self-defense. (I notice that really important distinctions, like the start of the millennium, were cruelly ignored by the world. I should start giving workshops. Guilt-inducing ones. Expensive ones.)

    Anyway, apparently the good St. Augustine opined that any sacred text not praising God counted as a “spiritual song” and not as a “hymn”. Perhaps we should start nitpicking people back, with this. :)

  16. Jayna says:

    That is simply priceless.

  17. AlanF says:

    MPod, I know what you mean, the final “hymn” at my parish church last Sunday for All Saints’ Day (It’s moved to Sunday in England) was “When The Saints Come Marching In”! Complete with guitars and tambourines!
    :0

  18. lol, the ocp products act as my fly swatter, and they’re great for collecting dust

  19. Marysann says:

    While it is not quite the same thing, this picture reminds me of how our former parochial vicar (he is now a pastor) used volumes of the New Catholic Encyclopedia: to hold up a short leg on the parish nativity set! As good stewards of the contributions of the faithful, we don’t want to let anything go to waste!

  20. ckdexterhaven says:

    Pelerin, OCP is the publisher of the hymnals that deem Charles Wesley (1707-1788) a poor lyricist on Hark the Herald Angels sing. Charles Wesley mistakenly wrote the words :”Pleased as man with men to dwell,” OCP changed it to “pleased as men with US to dwell”

    OCP kindly changed Julia Ward Howe’s lyrics to Battle Hymn of the Republic as well. Foolishly, in the last verse, Julia penned “Christ died to make MEN holy, let us die to make MEN free”. OCP fixed that grave error to “Christ died to make US holy….”

    I’m so glad OCP is there to fix the 200 year old errors of our forebears.

  21. WCR in Pittsburgh says:

    It appears that the center altar card has been modified in two places. What’s the story with that?

  22. Karen Russell says:

    ckdexterhaven–

    “Charles Wesley mistakenly wrote the words :”Pleased as man with men to dwell,” OCP changed it to “pleased as men with US to dwell”

    It could be worse. In the Catholic Book of Worship III, put out by the CCCB (Canadian conference of Catholic Bishops) the line is rendered:

    “Pleased as ONE with US to dwell.” (emphasis mine.)

    Yuck.

  23. Jeff Pinyan says:

    David Andrew — 6 November 2008 @ 8:10 am It’s also best, for many reasons, to just leave all the copies of “Bustin’ Bread” in the box when using the box for this purpose.

    I dunno… if those are in the box on the altar, isn\’t there a chance they could be misconstrued as an offering to God? I\’d hate to be standing at the altar when that lightning strikes. ;)

    (Time to go to confession………)

  24. Matt Q says:

    ckdexterhaven—
    “Charles Wesley mistakenly wrote the words :”Pleased as man with men to dwell,” OCP changed it to “pleased as men with US to dwell”

    It could be worse. In the Catholic Book of Worship III, put out by the CCCB (Canadian conference of Catholic Bishops) the line is rendered:

    “Pleased as ONE with US to dwell.” (emphasis mine.)

    Yuck.
    Comment by Karen Russell

    )(

    This is a classic example of why Catholicism today is insipid and insidiously dangerous. Mental patients who carry this PC stuff to such extremes and those who allow it deserve it. It’s the poor rest of us who have to suffer the spoiling of our Religion.