From the Martyrologium Romanum

From the Martyrologium Romanum:

1. Romae, sanctorum martyrum Felicis et Philippi in coemeterio Priscillae, Vitalis, Martialis et Alexandri in Iordanorum, Silani in Maximi, et Ianuarii in Praetextati; quorum coniuncta memoria gaudet Ecclesia Romana, quae una die tot glorificatur triumphis, quia cum multiplici exemplo multiplicata intercessione munitur.

 

Honorable mention to

3. In Sabinis, sanctarum Anatoliae et Victoriae, martyrum.

 

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About Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Fr. Z is the guy who runs this blog. o{]:¬)
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4 Responses to From the Martyrologium Romanum

  1. All these other things going on today… and the post about holy martyrs, even though in Latin, … not a single comment.

  2. Rellis says:

    I prayed this today in my 1964 Liturgical Press breviary. Do I get brownie points?

  3. I attended a daily TLM for these martyrs and the priest gave a great homily on how these martyrs were from two separate families and martyred at two different times.

    Holy Mother Church puts them together along with the Gospel reading for the day (Matt. 12:46-50)to emphasize our duties to our natural family as well as the spiritual family (The Communion of Saints). This is like a dual citizenship, one temporal and the other in Heaven.

    We do appreciate your posts Fr. Z, they do not go un-noticed. Happy Year of the Priest, may all priests be true to the Holy Father and to their vocations as shepherds of souls.

    St. Felicitas and her seven sons along with Ss. Rufina and Secunda, Pray for us.

  4. Rob F. says:

    Father Z,

    Thanks for posting these. I am very interested in the Martyrology, but do not have easy access to one, so your few references to them are greatly appreciated by me.

    I have a question about the Latinitas, however. I see several instances of the preposition “in” followed by a genitive, “in Iordanorum”, “in Maximi”, “in Praetextati”. Am I to assume that these prepositions govern an implicit “coemeterio” in these phrases? If not, how should they be translated?