OLDIE PODCAzT 58: Ember Days; Chrysostom on St. Matthias; Prayer to the Holy Spirit

Here is an oldie PODCAzT from 2008 for Pentecost Ember Wednesday.

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Today is Wednesday in the Octave of Pentecost, or at least it ought to be in in the Novus Ordo as it is in the older, Traditional Roman Calendar.

This is the third PODCAzT for the Pentecost Octave.
http://www.wdtprs.com/podcazt/08_05_14.mp3
Today we learn about what Ember Days are, these beautiful days which helped Catholics for may centuries regulate the rhythm of their lives in the consecration of the seasons of the year, and learn to use God’s creation with moderation. 

Then we hear from St. John Chrysostom (+407) on the choice of St. Matthias to replace Judas who had fallen away.

I have comments about bishops.

Finally, we hear a marvelous old prayer invoking the help of the Holy Spirit, appropriate in this Octave of Pentecost.

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2 Responses to OLDIE PODCAzT 58: Ember Days; Chrysostom on St. Matthias; Prayer to the Holy Spirit

  1. Fr. Basil says:

    \\Today we learn about what Ember Days are, these beautiful days which helped Catholics for may centuries regulate the rhythm of their lives in the consecration of the seasons of the year, and learn to use God’s creation with moderation. \\

    Which helped LATIN Catholics.

    The week after Pentecost is fast free for Eastern Catholics and other Eastern Christians.

  2. q7swallows says:

    Fr. Basil,
    To quote a memorable sighing Lenten remark from Fr. Z (by a Roman Catholic existing in an Eastern Catholic Church right now): It always boils down to the food.

    Can we not find SOME way to join each other in respectfully marking God’s changing season even during an octave when there is “no fasting”?

    Fr. Z,
    Thank you for the last prayer in the PODCAzT; it was particularly beautiful. Was it also by Chrysostom?